Adjustment Disorder

Adjustment disorder, also sometimes known as “situational depression,” is a short-term condition that occurs when a person is experiencing more stress or strain than would typically be expected in response to a change or event. It is commonly triggered by a specific stressor, like changing or losing a job, the death or illness of a loved one, undergoing a major life change (such as having a baby), or experiencing trauma in the form of a crime or disaster. The onset of adjustment disorder usually comes within three months of the triggering event and symptoms include feelings of worry, hopelessness, sadness, or anxiety. Sufferers of adjustment disorder may also experience insomnia, headaches, crying and a number of other mental or physical symptoms. The good news is that adjustment disorder is temporary and a qualified mental health practitioner can help you get through it. Contact one of TherapyDen’s adjustment disorder specialists today. 

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

situations cause depression, anxiety, anger, frustration and i can help you navigate these areas.

— Mitchel Eisenstein, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in East Setauket, NY

Life will surprise you all the time, and when it does, you must prepare to make adjustments for it. Those adjustments are designed to help you swim through those surprises so you can reach the other side. It is the other side that bares those gifts that have been created just for you. One way to receive those gifts is through therapy sessions. Try it! Give yourself a chance.

— MORANT CLINICAL SERVICES GROUP PRACTICE, Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA
 

I am delighted to have been able to assist many people who are struggling with challenges that are quite upsetting, often with both mood and anxiety components. Treatment includes practice with cognitive behavioral strategies designed to improve response to stressors and also use Eye Movement Desensitization (EMDR) therapy to desensitize upsetting stimuli. I would love to have opportunity to help you work through your adjustment issues.

— David Brooks, Clinical Psychologist in Bismarck, ND

Every single one of us, can at some point be diagnosed with an adjustment disorder. What is it? Well, it basically describes a time when an individual is having a tough time dealing with an identifable stressor. That sounds almost....normal. Right. Not everything needs to be pathologized (I've now hit my "big word" quota for the day). But if it's something that is causing you stress or difficulty in your life, then it matters regardless of now "normal" it may be.

— Adriana Scott-Wolf, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Rockville Centre, NY
 

Transitions, life-changes, stressors, and loss all contribute to your need to adjust to a new normal for your life. Most of my professional work these 30 years has been helping clients to design their new normal and at times accept their current life experiences. Much of this includes understanding the changes, accepting them, and building a newer system of attitudes, beliefs and skills. Finding your inner strengths, past solutions, and current resilient behaviors will ease the adjustment.

— Debra Ainbinder, Licensed Professional Counselor

There’s no denying that life often presents us with our fair share of challenges, usually in the form of sudden change. These life transitions, even the positive ones, can throw us into a tailspin and leave us feeling stressed, confused and vulnerable. But with the right tools and mindset, you have the power to not only overcome any adversity but also transform into a more authentic and confident version of yourself.

— Jessica Clark, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in El Dorado Hills, CA
 

Adaptation is a primary focus of my practice. So whatever life stresses and challenges you face, how you adjust to them will define whether you will successfully emerge from these experiences or not. I can help you find and strengthen your adaptive skills.

— Foad Afshar, Psychotherapist in Manchester, NH

When unexpected changes occur in our lives, sometimes we need support understanding, accepting, and making space for the impacts. Some symptoms might include: nightmares, panic attacks, intense crying, confusion, and feeling lost. Please reach out for support.

— Constance Thorsnes, Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I assist my client's in adjusting to life changes and challenges associated with those changes.

— Patricia Unger, Licensed Professional Counselor in Murrells Inlet, SC

I work with children, teens, and adults who deal with adjustments on a daily basis.

— Ashley Schrad, Counselor in Omaha, NE
 

Emotional Support Communication Skills Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

— Martin Keller, Psychologist in Phoenix, AZ

I provide Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to assist clients in learning better ways to cope and accept change.

— Taylor Larsen, Counselor in Gilbert, AZ
 

It's often in transitions that we find the parts of us who need more attention or support. Internal Family Systems (IFS) therapy helps us address the parts of us experiencing concerns, which may arise in the form of panic, depression, anxiety, confusion, dissociation, anger, numbness, or resistance. These reactions are "trailheads" that will lead us to find lost, vulnerable parts of ourselves. Reclaiming these parts and their energy moves us successfully through to the other side.

— Prudence Tippins, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Viroqua, WI

It's often in transitions that we find the parts of us who need more attention or support. Internal Family Systems (IFS) therapy helps us address the parts of us experiencing concerns, which may arise in the form of panic, depression, anxiety, confusion, dissociation, anger, numbness, or resistance. These reactions are "trailheads" that will lead us to find lost, vulnerable parts of ourselves. Reclaiming these parts and their energy moves us successfully through to the other side.

— Prudence Tippins, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Viroqua, WI
 

Does it feel like you can't quite get it together after an event or change? Even good changes, but definitely harder ones, can leave us feeling like we are in over our heads. When your usual methods of coping with stress are not quite doing the job, it's time to get some help. Even short-term therapy can provide you with lasting tools to make transitions and adjustments smoother, so you can face changes with courage and skill.

— Pamela Suraci, Marriage & Family Therapist in CA & UT, CA

Our world is changing and how we interact with others, keep connections and create new relationships. Adjustment Disorder consist of stress, difficultly managing change, sadness, anxiety due to life changes and events. You may find that your normal coping skills are not as effective or not available at all due to the situations out of your control.

— Sara Lowery, Psychotherapist in Marion, NC
 

Transition, change, and other reasons we may be experiencing an adjustment disorder can feel discouraging and tough but can also create rewarding experiences in our life. Let me support you through this difficult time and create a safe space to process what is going on for you.

— Annie Buxbaum, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA

Parenting is a big responsibility full of many moments of joy, doubt, love, fear, and more. Many questions about who we want to be as a parent, who we will become in the process, and how our child will ultimately perceive their relationship with us swirl in an expecting parent's mind. I offer a space for expecting parents to share and process all the feelings both positive and negative that come up as they adjust to this impactful transition.

— Luisa Bakhoum, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate