Compassion Fatigue

Compassion fatigue, sometimes called "secondary traumatic stress disorder," is a combination of symptoms most commonly seen among those who work directly with victims of trauma, disaster, or illness, especially in the healthcare industry. When caregivers don't have the opportunity or energy to practice self-care in the midst of helping others, compassion fatigue can result. Symptoms of compassion fatigue can mimic those of chronic stress and often include feelings of apathy and isolation. Working with a mental health professional can help prevent the onset of compassion fatigue by helping caregivers develop mechanisms to manage and cope with stress, and build in time for self-care. If you are already feeling the stress of compassion fatigue, a qualified therapist can help you to recover. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s compassion fatigue experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

As a provider and leader within an urban level one trauma center and community mental health clinic, I know what it is like to experience high levels of compassion fatigue. I have provided trainings, supervision, and individual counseling to healthcare professionals over the last decade.

— Sheri Richardt, Clinical Social Worker in Murfreesboro, TN

If you work in a field where you are exposed to the pain and suffering of others on a regular basis and you are experiencing chronic physical or emotional exhaustion, intrusive thoughts, nightmares, irritability, sadness, feeling numb, detached, depressed or like you are not important you may be experiencing compassion fatigue or what is often referred to as secondary or vicarious trauma. This is common amongst caregivers and you deserve the same care you provide to others.

— Sabrina Basquez, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Greensboro, NC
 

It is common for animal care professionals (veterinarians, vet techs, wildlife rehabbers, zoo keepers, support staff, etc) to develop burnout, compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma, suicidal thoughts, and depression. As a fur-mom and animal lover, it is my honor to give you a space to process, build coping skills, and set boundaries to improve work/life balance, improve self-care, and carry on with the important work you do.

— Ashton Burdick, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Cleveland, NC

Caring for others is never an easy undertaking. It often feels unrewarding, overwhelming, and endless. My experience offers relief by way of re-evaluating your goals, boundaries, and priorities to provide Life-affirming care for yourself, in balance with others.

— Jon DeAngelis, Creative Art Therapist
 

I received formal training through a 2 year program in health and well-being. The strategies and interventions I learned focused on increasing health and vitality related to chronic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Additionally, my experiences for the past 20 + years have enabled me to apply theoretical knowledge with practical experiences in a variety of settings including healthcare, education, and administration.

— Regina Whittington, Therapist in Sunset Hills, MO

Employee burnout and mental health concerns are on the rise. Many are struggling to keep up morale and motivation with their employees to stay productive and focused. Therapy will help you learn new skills for coping with stress so you can focus on being present in your life and be able to cope with stressors around you.

— Jill Morris, Clinical Psychologist
 

You’re exhausted, both emotionally and physically. This is what happens when you use empathy day in and day out with people who are suffering. And now you’re suffering too. In 2013 I began helping helping professionals like you–caring people who’ve lost their creative spark for caring. Please visit www.meganvanmeter.com to learn how reigniting your creative spark can help you burn bright again. Isn’t it about time for YOU to shine? I’d love to help you create a better outcome for yourself.

— Megan VanMeter, Art Therapist

Are you experiencing burn out? Do you work in a career that demands a lot from you? Do you carry the weight of the world on your shoulders? I can support you in remembering the importance of putting on your own oxygen mask first. How do you nurture yourself in demanding relationships? How do you care for yourself when the world asks so much from you? Contact me and we can begin to explore how to better take care of you!

— Jenna Noah, Counselor in Denver, CO
 

It has been especially gratifying to me over the years to be a helper to fellow helpers. Whether you are a counselor, medical professional, firefighter/EMT or other first responder, a pastor or other person on the front lines of human suffering, if would be my honor to support you in relieving the burdens you carry and gaining some tools to prevent such fatigue in the future.

— Christine Bates, Licensed Professional Counselor in Oxford, MS

Are you involved in animal rescue? A Heath Care worker? Navigating the care for a sick or aging family member? Or, maybe you’re a veterinarian, a new parent, a social justice warrior, or a volunteer in your community. I am several of these things as well and if compassion is a demand placed on you every day, it can quickly drain our empathy reserves leaving us feeling worn out, numb, exhausted, distracted, drowning, inadequate, and dreading the next day.

— Colleen Ignatowski, Therapist in Rochester, NY
 

If you are exhausted, overwhelmed, or shaken by having witnessed more than you can hold all at once, you may be experiencing vicarious trauma. You, too, deserve respite and sanctuary. We can find, together, rootedness even in the midst of the storm. I offer supervision, consultation, and psychotherapy for helping professionals, including healers, mental health and medical professionals, spiritual leaders, caregivers, and community organizers.

— Aleisa Myles, Psychologist in Media, PA

If you are exhausted, overwhelmed, or shaken by having witnessed more than you can hold all at once, you may be experiencing vicarious trauma. You, too, deserve respite and sanctuary. We can find, together, rootedness even in the midst of the storm. I offer supervision, consultation, and psychotherapy for helping professionals, including healers, mental health and medical professionals, spiritual leaders, caregivers, and community organizers.

— Aleisa Myles, Psychologist in Media, PA
 

I am a certified compassion fatigue professional (CCFP) with training in helping clients experience through a short-term, solution focused lens. I provide this service to individuals who work in high compassion professions such as county settings, legal professions, medical field and veterinary field. Services are aimed toward identifying and implementing tools for immediate use in the field. Treatment is typically between 3-8 sessions.

— Kathryn Krug, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santee, CA

With experience, training, and certification as a Compassion Fatigue Professional and a yoga teacher, Katherina brings to mental health, teachers, and healthcare providers tools and knowledge to maximize staying power in the helping profession. These workshops offer an opportunity to begin or continue the conversation about the emotional and physical cost of helping others who are hurt. We learn compassion fatigue is normal; we can heal with support, knowledge, and a self-compassion plan.

— Katherina Alexandre, Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

Are you involved in animal rescue? A Heath Care worker? Navigating the care for a sick or aging family member? Or, maybe you’re a veterinarian, a new parent, a social justice warrior, or a volunteer in your community. I am several of these things as well and if compassion is a demand placed on you every day, it can quickly drain our empathy reserves leaving us feeling worn out, numb, exhausted, distracted, drowning, inadequate, and dreading the next day.

— Colleen Ignatowski, Therapist in Rochester, NY

Many healthcare workers and first responders experience compassion fatigue without realizing it. It manifests itself with work dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression, difficulty concentrating and many other symptoms that often go unnoticed. We can work together through insomnia, post traumatic stress and other symptoms associated with compassion fatigue to get you to a better emotional and mental space.

— Nataly Kuznetsov, PMHNP-BC, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in NAPA, CA
 

Are you involved in animal rescue? A Heath Care worker? Navigating the care for a sick or aging family member? Or, maybe you’re a veterinarian, a new parent, a social justice warrior, or a volunteer in your community. I am several of these things as well and if compassion is a demand placed on you every day, it can quickly drain your empathy reserves leaving you feeling worn out, numb, exhausted, distracted, drowning, inadequate, and dreading the next day.

— Colleen Ignatowski, Therapist in Rochester, NY