Family Caregiving Stress

Providing ongoing care to a family member with chronic or disabling conditions can be incredibly difficult. Family caregiver stress occurs when a caregiver becomes so focused on the needs of their loved one (in this case a family member) that they aren't aware of their own well-being. Symptoms of caregiver stress include irregular sleep patterns, fluctuations in weight, and feeling overwhelmed, tired, irritable or constantly worried. To manage family caregiving stress, it can help to seek support from others that are in a similar situation (e.g. a support group), or work with a professional to practice self-care, set realistic goals, set boundaries, and learn to accept help. If you are experiencing the stress of caring for a family member, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

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You try so hard to be there for your aging parent, as well as for your own family. No one seems to know the struggle it is to balance both of these parts of your life. It's just expected that you will be there when your parent falls and is rushed to the ER. It's just expected that you will attend a daughter's soccer game, when all you really want to do is slip into a bath then head to bed. You are exhausted. My name is Lisabeth Wotherspoon, and I help with Caregiver Burnout.

— Lisabeth Wotherspoon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Rochester, NH

Caregiving can be very draining. Without caring for oneself it is difficult to be effective in this demanding capacity.

— Caryn Warren, Addictions Counselor in Mesa, AZ
 

I specialize in working with parents of infants with special medical needs, beginning in pregnancy with fetal diagnosis and through delivery. This includes neonatal hospitalization (NICU, CICU) and managing the transition home after hospitalization. I also provide support to parents of older children whether facing a new diagnosis or managing their child's chronic medical needs.

— Kate Christman, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

I am a single mother of an adult child with a significant developmental disability and I have served on our Governor appointed WA State Developmental Disabilities Council. In addition, I have counseled family caregivers during my time in community mental health.

— Kelly Hill, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Alzheimer's and chronic illnesses affect everyone in the family. Caregiver mental health is just as important as the health of the person with the illness. I have extensive experience working with both types of family members.

— Julie Kenworth, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

Caregiving can be very draining. Without caring for oneself it is difficult to be effective in this demanding capacity.

— Caryn Warren, Addictions Counselor in Mesa, AZ
 

Often care giving for a loved one falls on one person. It is my hope to provide support to you as you manage and balance this. I have experience aiding those whose loves ones have chronic medical concerns, terminal illness, or mental health diagnoses.

— Monica Cagayat, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA

I am in a caregiver role in the world of developmental disabilities, I understand how isolating it can be and how exhausting it is to battle the system.

— Kelly Hill, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Caregiving can be very draining. Without caring for oneself it is difficult to be effective in this demanding capacity.

— Caryn Warren, Addictions Counselor in Mesa, AZ

I've worked with Family caregivers during my work experience as a social worker in an elder abuse program, at an Alzheimer's disease organization and at an organization for individuals with Multiples Sclerosis. I also ran support groups and lead presentations about the stress of Family caregiving.

— Christine M. ValentĂ­n, Clinical Social Worker in Middlesex, NJ
 

I specialize in working with parents of infants and children with special medical needs, including neonatal hospitalization (NICU, CICU) and managing the transition home after hospitalization. I also provide support to parents of older children, whether facing a new diagnosis or managing their child's chronic medical needs at home.

— Kate Christman, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

Taking care of all the necessities of a family can lead to stress and burnout. Caregivers often don't have time to process their own experiences, sort their thoughts, and make decisions that are in alignment with their values because their day-to-day is consumed with responsibilities. When caregivers have space for themselves, they are able to choose paths for themselves and their families that are more authentic and therefore sustainable. Caregivers' will-being is essential.

— Luisa Bakhoum, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate