Life transitions

Change is hard, even in the best of circumstances and adjusting to major life transitions, even when they are positive, can be difficult. Whether you are getting married, moving, changing jobs, having a child – or any of the other many transitions we can expect as part of life – coping and navigating the stress of a major change can cause depression and anxiety, among other issues. If you are having trouble with accepting or adjusting to life transition, a qualified mental health professional can help you find healthy ways of coping. Rach out to one of TherapyDen’s life transition experts today. 

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As a specialist in vocational rehabilitation, my experience is in empowering my clients to reach their full potential in work and health and in their life path. My education in rehabilitation counseling supports my expertise in helping people overcome barriers created by disability, mental or physical. I have worked with many gender diverse individuals as they have re-imagined and re-created their lives and utilized my skills in counseling and guidance.

— MAGGIE METCALFE, Counselor

I primarily work with women going through, preparing for, or recovering from life transitions. Feelings of anxiety, depression, overwhelm, uncertainty and trauma can be associated with grief/loss, career and education transitions, relationships, starting a family, infertility, to name a few. Also, if you have any experienced any trauma (regardless of how recent), life may feel like it is in transition everyday - trying to get to a place of peace and acceptance.

— Jennifer Reynolds, Counselor in Lakewood, CO
 

A life transition can take many forms. Changing a job, entering/leaving a relationship, a passing of a loved one, moving to a new country, graduating. The list can go on. The support that I would provide here is creating a space for deep emotional processing. Supporting my client in being able to experience and sit with their feelings, while actively responding to life events through structured systems.

— Raihaan Attawala, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Boston, MA

Life transitions are overwhelming and change is challenging. I have had the privilege of allowing clients to have the space in therapy to talk through the complex emotions of life transitions.

— Rachel Moses, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

As we progress through life, our priorities and interests change, our goals and wishes take new shapes, and we move in and out of relationships and roles. It can be hard to make sense of the ongoing transitions, and sometimes you may feel stuck and overwhelmed when your inner needs begin to bump uncomfortably against your outer environment. In therapy together, I will support you in identifying what is most important to you, and help you take action toward cultivating the future you envision.

— Rachel Fernbach, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

Are you going through life changes, a new job, an empty nest syndrome, death and grief, a divorce or a marriage, a new baby, a move to a new home or city, a career change, or starting school? I can help you get through these life transitions. We can do it together, you are not alone. I look forward to helping you as your therapist.

— Geneva Drane, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Louisville, KY
 

Depending on your needs, we might do EMDR or CBT approaches and I am flexible about providing tangible assignments or not according to your preferences.

— Karla Rennhofer, Clinical Psychologist

Though the phrase, "the only thing constant is change" is one familiar to many of us, this often feels like little comfort during the turmoil of a significant transition. Changes in life circumstances can impact us on every level of our being and external life. Seeking therapy during these times can be both anchor and guide light. I will support you to process the loss of how things have been. When you are ready, we will set consciously developed goals for the phase of life that you are in.

— Stephanie Smith, Psychologist in Sacramento, CA
 

Life is full of transitions and I have supported clients in navigating transitions through different stages of life, former athlete transitions, break-ups, various types of grief, new beginnings and everything in between. While doing this work, I like to draw from the enneagram, attachment theories, understanding the ego, drawing from one's values, narrative therapy and person-centered therapy just to name a few. I also use Prepare and Enrich to support couples with premarital therapy.

— Ashley Gray, Social Worker in Arvada, CO

Many people find their grief and loss is related to other non death experiences, such as retirement, empty nest, moving, change of jobs, personal identity (sexuality, faith). I can help you explore current stressors and help make a plan for the future.

— Monica Cagayat, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA
 

We all have them. Life transitions. Change. It sucks. However, reaching out for support is helpful to many whether it be a move out or a move in, a career change (by choice or not by choice) or adjusting to a marriage or divorce and so many others. My work with you would be to see how to the expected or unexpected life transition might be bringing up past traumas or past experiences.

— Alicia Walker, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Montclair, NJ

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered integrative approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Life is a series of transitions. We are always learning and failing is sometimes our best teacher. If we don't learn, we tend to repeat our same mistakes. Then we go either backwards or sideways. But if we pay close attention, we have the wonderful opportunity to actually ascend. That is why we are here, in this life. We can actually learn how to be a better person. Instead of living with a wounded closed heart, we can learn how to open our heart and be happy again. A therapist can be the key.

— Robert Teister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Ballard, WA

With every choice we make and every change we experience (even the good and positive ones!), there's an element of grief. In other words, we are grieving, in ways big and small, all throughout our lives. But, somehow, perversely, that doesn't mean that we're actually any good at this grieving business. We often struggle to make sense of it, and we can't figure out what to do now. But you know you're ready to figure out a better way forward.

— Rebecca Mercurio, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Louis, MO
 

Over the past ten years I have helped Single Mothers and Adult individuals deal with a variety of life transitions (i.e. divorce, career changes, relationship issues, occupational stressors, etc.).

— Dr. Dierdra Oretade-Branch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Life is a series of transitions. We are always learning and failing is sometimes our best teacher. If we don't learn, we tend to repeat our same mistakes. Then we go either backwards or sideways. But if we pay close attention, we have the wonderful opportunity to actually ascend. That is why we are here, in this life. We can actually learn how to be a better person. Instead of living with a wounded closed heart, we can learn how to open our heart and be happy again. A therapist can be the key.

— Robert Teister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Ballard, WA
 

Has something impacted your life in a way that has you feeling out of control, maybe in a way you have not experienced before; a profound loss, a betrayal, the realization of a mental health or addiction issue, an identity crisis? When this happens life can feel tenuous and uncertain. We begin to question whether we have what it takes to get through. The self-doubt can take root and the inner critic can seem more powerful than ever. Recovery and healing are available through life transitions.

— Cherie Mills, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

Much of life is spent in states of transition. We transition in our friendships, situationships and relationships. We transition between schools, out of schools and into the "real" world. We transition when we move for jobs, for people or away from people. We transition within our family dynamics with our siblings, parents and they with us. We transition into and through this process of "adulting."

— Lynette Cisneros, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Raleigh, NC