Stress

Stress is an important part of life. In fact, it can be critical to our survival. Stress triggers the “fight or flight” response that can let us know we are in danger. However, too much stress for too long can compromise our mental and physical health. Everyday stressors, such as work, finances, family issues or relationships can spiral out of control. If you are feeling overloaded or struggling to keep up with the demands of your life, you might be experiencing stress. Stress can be controlled, but recognizing stress symptoms can be elusive. Things like low energy, headaches, insomnia, low self-esteem, difficulty relaxing, constant worrying, feeling overwhelmed or changes in appetite can all be symptoms of stress (among many others). If you think you might be dealing with chronic stress, working with a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s stress experts today.

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Stress is a common contributor to depressed mood, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and changes in your sleep or eating routine. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking on your life, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in how to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI

The most important skill in coping with distress is to maintain the insight that we can always “click on a menu" with four types of skills. I can help you to learn and confidently practice skills to (1) soothe and relax intense emotion; (2) change behaviors and solve problems; (3) challenge disempowering thoughts with more accurate ways of thinking; and (4) let go of expectations, judgments, and demands rather than resisting the inevitable realities of life.

— Jon Frederick, PhD, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Whether you are in high school, college, or out on your own, you've probably experienced your fair share of stress. The question is, what do we do with it? How do we cope? We avoid, we withdraw, we engage in drug use, risky behavior, all sorts of ways to escape pain. That’s what life becomes, how can I escape the pain. We need someone to talk to, find a way to slow things down, break them into smaller pieces, learn to accept ourselves the way we are. I can help you get to a better place.

— Andrew Brucker, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

"Stress" is a broad term, but it also broadly affects our society today, in ways that are becoming increasingly pervasive and toxic. Our daily lives can be incredibly harried, distracted, overloaded, and often debilitating. This accumulation of stress can have an impact on self-esteem, relationships, health, daily functioning, and sleep, to name a few. I use approaches based in mindfulness, CBT, self-compassion, boundary-setting, and self-care to help clients address sources of stress.

— Allison Staiger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Metairie, LA
 

Reducing stress through exploring the root of the stress, as well as providing skills and tools to regulate stress levels.

— Dylan Johnson, Associate Professional Counselor

Have you been feeling stressed about your relationships? Feel like you have to solve your loved one's problems for them? Maybe your family member or friend is using drugs or alcohol excessively and you don't know how to help. Or maybe they have mental health issues or chronic illness that has been taking its toll on you. You don't have to do this alone. As an experienced Stress and Relationship therapist, I can assist you in sorting out your stuff and finding some relief that will stick.

— Jennifer Leupp, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA
 

The Epidemic of Modern Life in Our Society is STRESS Stress itself is not a disease, but it leads to a breakdown in psychological, body and brain functioning.  Stress is disease causing. If stress is not relieved damage occurs. As your body and brain experience your reactions to stress triggers, You have become the stressor itself. Three Inter-related Phases of Stress Damage: *Psychological and Neuronal (brain) Damage:  begins with A) feeling mentally tired, drained of energy which can mask as depression, anxiety, panic. B) Brain fatigue results in impaired focus, impaired attention/concentration, impaired learning of new information, and impaired memory recall of recent information. It can mask as attention deficit disorder (ADD).  It can also present as Mild Cognitive Impairment or incipient dementia. *Behavioral Damage: Negative changes in behavior most often show up in 2 major areas: relationships and work.  A) friction or arguments B) less productivity and creativity, C) distracting avoidant behavior (e.g. compulsions, addictions, substance abuse) . * Physical Damage: Physical fatigue, allergies, asthma, skin conditions, headaches, compromised immune system functioning, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, heart disease, heart attack, stroke and et cetera. We all react differently to stressful situations. What is stressful to one person may not be stressful to another. Almost anything can cause stress. For some people, just thinking about something or several small things can cause stress. How we react to a situation will affect how stress affects us and our health. A person who feels they do not have enough resources to cope will be more likely to have a stronger stress reaction, and also can trigger health problems. There are many techniques to deal with stress, the underlying issues that trigger stress, and the hazards of stress. If you feel stressed out, or overwhelmed, you should know that life doesn’t have to be this way. Together, you and Dr. Shawna, will look into your life to find the sources of your stress, stress triggers, and figure out what to change, or implement. These things may involve your work, your family, or all other areas of your personal life. You will also learn techniques and coping skills to help you relax. Dr. Shawna is an expert at stress management. She will help you sort through issues and find the best ways to cope in healthy ways and move forward.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

Stress is awful. It can make us feel anxious or even just make us shut down, but either way it makes everything else in our life so much harder to deal with. You can change how you see stress though. When we work together, you'll learn ways to cope with stress in a health way, so you can trust that you can handle stressful situations, even if they may feel overwhelming right now.

— Danielle Wayne, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID
 

Stress is a common contributor to depressed mood, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and unplanned changes in your sleep or eating routine. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in how to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI

Stress is like a workout - the right amount can help you grow to your full potential, but too much can leave you drained or injured. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in your ability to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

Would it be nice to be stress free? Let's think about that. When people think about stress, there is a negative connotation associated with that word...STRESS. However, there is good stress and bad stress. Good stress allows us to stay motivated and achieve our goals whereas bad stress can cause procrastination, burn out, and feelings of being overwhelmed. Overcoming bad stress creates resilience, "if I can get through this, I can get through anything".

— Heather Nemeth, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Western Springs, IL

Stress is like a workout - the right amount can help you rise to your full potential, but too much can leave you drained or injured. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in your ability to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

I love providing my clients with tools to decrease their stress and find a healthy life balance. If you are constantly frustrated, unhappy, and stressed....I can provide you with techniques that you can begin using right away to create the life you've always wanted. Peace and balance are right around the corner!

— Amy Braun, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

Stress is a regular part of life, but it’s how we respond to stress that will determine the impact on our physical and mental health. What do you do when things become chaotic and overwhelming? During stressful times, are your behaviors helping your situation or adding to your stress? At the SCIA, we know that stress is inevitable, and no one is exempt. Together, we’ll process the stressors in your life and determine coping strategies appropriate for your unique situation.

— Bianca Walker, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta,
 

Stress is a crucial part of everyday life. I am here to help you figure out how to better manage thoughts, feelings, and behaviors relating to stress.

— Danielle Graddick, Clinical Psychologist in Livingston, NJ

Before becoming a therapist, I was a driven professional in a high-pressure environment. No amount of work felt like enough, which led to burnout and self-doubt. I knew the way I was going about handling work just wasn’t working. Through my own therapy, I learned how to take responsibility for my part in my struggles, set and hold limits with work and eventually find a career that was more congruent with my values.

— Damon Dodge, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Hollywood, CA
 

Stress is a common occurrence in today's world. There are differences between 'normal' stress and chronic/prolonged stress. Chronic stress is harmful to one's health and can lead to significant health issues, both physical and psychological. It is important to identify stressors, explore factors that cause chronic stress, and develop strategies to reduce daily as well as chronic stress.

— Erica Zapata Gonzalez, Clinical Psychologist in Modesto, CA

Chronic Stress causes more damage to our bodies than we realize. Whether it is headaches, digestive issues, insomnia, moodiness, brain fog, sadness, fatigue, or low motivation that you experience, all can be a result of the body being in a constant state of fight or flight. A rush of stress hormones are released and the body has a difficult time returning to homeostasis. Through an integrative approach, the mind and body can start to move towards homeostasis/balance with a relief in symptoms

— Kelly Venuti, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Saint Petersburg, FL