Therapists Who Treat Other Therapists

Therapists need therapy too! While therapists are trained to provide counseling services to their clients they unfortunately can't provide the same service to themselves. Therapists experience burn out, compassion fatigue, counter transference and more while working with clients. A good therapist that want's to stay in tip top shape will receive their own counseling from a practitioner that is trained to treat their fellow colleague. Reach out to one of the qualified specialist below.

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Meet the specialists

 

Those of us on the front lines need someone to talk to too....and our own space to process the unique difficulties surrounding us in this time. The void we scream into is full, so I recommend that we each have our own helping professional to debrief with.

— Hannah Zimmerman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Missoula, MT

I enjoy seeing therapists as clients because they are motivated and insightful.

— SALLY RUMSEY, Licensed Professional Counselor in Hartland, VT
 

Burnout. Compassion fatigue. Vicarious trauma. The experiences that we have as therapists often go unacknowledged, unidentified, and untreated. I'd like to change that narrative. In my work as a therapist in high-risk, high-turnover facilities, I found that I had a passion for offering empathetic, supportive counseling to therapists and other helping professionals. I offer a safe, non-judgmental space for you to be honored and supported in your experience as both a therapist and human.

— Briana Driver, Clinical Social Worker in Philadelphia, PA

I have extensive experience with clinical supervision and emotional support of social workers and psychiatrists. I've worked in mental health agencies and hospitals with a diversity of high-risk patients and I aim to support anyone who is experiencing burn-out or compassion fatigue.

— Liz Silverman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

Are you experiencing countertransference, feeling overwhelmed with your workload, or experiencing vicarious trauma? Maybe a colleague has seen you struggling and suggested you seek personal therapy. Maybe you are new to the field and wondering what the heck you got yourself into. (Been there!) You might be judging yourself for not being able to “figure it out.” Come! Be radically human, and let someone who intimately gets it attune to your needs.

— Serena Forward-Rodriguez, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

Being a therapist is hard at times. We are human and struggle at times. Being a therapist can trigger our own issues; and those need to be addressed to be the most effective therapist you can be. And to be the healthiest version of you. For you, your family, friends, and clients. I have had the privilege to work with other therapist's and help guide them through difficult times. I have been the therapist client and know what it is like. Now is the time to give yourself the care you deserve.

— Eric Strom, Clinical Social Worker in Minnetonka, MN
 

Truthfully, therapists need safe spaces too. Grappling with issues like clarity/alignment within the counselor identity, secondary trauma, and burnout, I enjoy supporting therapists!

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

Our jobs are hard - we provide support to those going through stressful, difficult times, learn more about our clients than their friends and family, help them with the heavy lifting of healing, and then we go back to our own lives. Without some support, therapists become over-burdened, dull, burnt out and even emotionally and physically unwell. The best therapists are those who practice what we preach - getting help and support in our own lives. After 30 years in the field, I get it.

— Pamela Suraci, Marriage & Family Therapist in CA & UT, CA
 

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. You feeling seen & heard is crucial. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about breaking through this barrier.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

I am a seasoned therapist with 40 years in the field. I am a former agency clinical director who consulted regularly with the clinical staff. I am a long term clinical supervisor for CSWA's as well. I know intricately the challenges we therapists face in providing services in our clinical practices.... Burnout and Compassion Fatigue are at an all time high in our field. Self care is Key and having your own therapist to process with can help stem the tide of becoming overwhelmed.

— Joseph Doherty, Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to our clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about deconstructing this stigma.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

I have a passion and desire to assist others. Therapist experience burnout from being care givers to their clients, patients & to their own family members. Also, the expectations put on them or they put on themselves. They often wonder where do I fit in & who takes care of me? How do I continue to keep giving, when my reserves are being depleted or empty. I assist therapist/providers with finding that balance amongst their family, career, relationships and most importantly for themselves.

— Cheryl Carr, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Hamburg, NY
 

Brene Brown said and I believe that "Every good social worker needs a social worker". As a board-approved clinical social work supervisor, I have mentored, educated, and counseled dozens of social workers, counselors, and therapists. It has been the honor of my life being a Grand Therapist.

— Renita Davis, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Gulf Breeze, FL

Therapists need their own therapists more than ever right now. You are showing up every day, witnessing for others, and giving your all; it is crucial to have your own space to share and process your own experiences. It is also an incredible process to ensure your own healing and development. I will always begin with a strength based approach and incorporate a variety of strategies to address stress management, compassion fatigue, trauma, anxiety, and other related experiences.

— Regina Whittington, Therapist in Clayton, MO
 

I have worked with many therapists who needed treatment themselves. Therapists are human, too and just because we know what resources, tools, and practices can be helpful does not mean they are easily integrated into our lives. I thoroughly enjoy working with other therapists and helping them to deepen their relationship with all of the parts of themselves that need love and care.

— Thaeda Franz, Licensed Professional Counselor