Abuse

Abuse can take many forms – it could be verbal, emotional or physical. Even after the abuse has ended, survivors are often left with intense negative feelings. But the good news is, you don’t have to figure it out on your own. If you or someone you know is suffering from abuse of any kind, contact one of our specialists today to get help.

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Narcissistic, controlling, or manipulative behaviors in others is not acceptable. Finding safety, security, and a place to fully express your feelings is invaluable. I conduct ongoing support groups for like-minded people in toxic relationships with unpredictable partners. I utilize EMDR therapy to treat trauma.

— Barbara Beck, Marriage & Family Therapist in Leawood, KS

Abuse can come in many different forms. This can be more extreme things such as psychical violence, mental abuse, or emotional abuse. Or this can be in other forms of abuse such as neglect. No matter how that may have looked, it is still very important to process through what took place and how that has altered the course of events in your life. This could be how we connect to others or how we allow others to interact in our lives.

— Nicole Bieri, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Colorado Springs, CO
 

It's important for me to know what my client means by "abuse". Abuse can be traumatic & it's equally important to understand what about the abuse may be traumatic for my client. From there we can work on resolving the abuse (trauma). This work may involve: decreasing the uncomfortable to distressing symptoms you're experiencing; increasing the ability to stay in your comfort zone (regulated) when "triggered"; helping your body process the experience (experience lives in the body) to resolve it.

— Brian La Roy Jones, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA

It's important for me to know what my client means by "abuse". Abuse can be traumatic & it's equally important to understand what about the abuse may be traumatic for my client. From there we can work on resolving the abuse (trauma). This work may involve: decreasing the uncomfortable to distressing symptoms you're experiencing; increasing the ability to stay in your comfort zone (regulated) when "triggered"; helping your body process the experience (experience lives in the body) to resolve it.

— Brian La Roy Jones, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

I completed a concentration in trauma and abuse along with my degree. I am attuned to the way that sexual abuse, trauma, emotional & physical abuse impact our capacity to relate to others and trust ourselves. I am passionate about narrative-focused trauma care.

— Katie Vigneulle, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA

When the relationship with a caregiver represents trauma, lack of empathy and even cruelty, the implications last long past childhood. As an adult you may have dedicated yourself into work and/or your family in order to soothe that pain inside, yet something is still amiss. You struggle with self-worth and insecurity. In therapy, we can collaboratively work through that place of pain and loneliness towards a place of wholeness and connection. 

— Anny Papatheodorou, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

Abuse messes with our brains and can even re-wire them. Trauma is your body doing its best to cope with abnormal, stressful, or long-lasting negative events, like abuse. Symptoms may include hyper-vigilance, nightmares, guilt, self-blame, becoming easily startled, isolation, decreased interests in activities, difficulty sleeping, flashbacks, forgetfulness, and panic. Although the trauma symptoms can be overwhelming, there is hope for healing.

— Morgan Ticum, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Overland Park, KS

Physical, emotional, and sexual abuse has been at pandemic proportions long before global events made the word commonplace. Untreated interpersonal trauma can wreck havoc on a person's sense of self and ability to live an authentic and fulfilling life. I have worked with countless women and men who have abuse histories and helped them find a path through the pain.

— Jeanine Moreland, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL
 

Too many people are dealing with the effects of abuse, either as a child , as an adult in romantic relationships, or both. I can help you heal from the trauma of abuse, and teach you coping strategies and how create healthy boundaries, so that you can stop the cycle of abuse moving forward.

— Jodie Solberg, Hypnotherapist in Lynnwood, WA

Abuse of any kind leaves lasting, and often invisible, wounds. When untreated, these wounds get passed through generations and spread through relationships despite our best attempts to stop the cycle on our own. If you are taking steps to actively heal your own wounds, you are not only healing yourself, but honoring the generations both before and after you, and protecting the relationships surrounding you now.

— Stacey Hannigan, Licensed Mental Health Counselor
 

Recovering from domestic violence and/or sexual violence, whether it happened to you as a child or an adult; religious abuse, leaving high demand groups; religious trauma; narcissistic abuse

— Katy Perkins Coveney, Clinical Social Worker in Fayetteville, NC

Emotional abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, domestic, financial, and spiritual abuse all wreak havoc on your identity. You are not what the offender told you, you were. We can work to untangle those belief patterns with a deeper understanding of story-work.

— Kimberly Dudley, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) is a unique approach to psychotherapy. ART is unique because the ART Therapist guides the client to replace the negative images in the mind that cause the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress with positive images of the client’s choosing. And this is done quickly, most often within one session! Once the negative images have been replaced by positive ones, the triggers will be gone.

— Alexis Miller, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wichita, KS

My approach to therapy is trauma-informed and ensures that you will not feel re-traumatized while working on yourself in therapy sessions.

— Neeka Wittern, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Las Vegas, NV, NV
 

I specialize in those who have experienced religious and or spiritual abuse or have left a high control group or cult.

— Greta MacMillan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Madison, CT

Narcissist dick or controlling, manipulative behaviors in others is not acceptable. Finding safety, security oh, and a place to fully express your feelings invaluable. I conduct ongoing support groups for like-minded people in toxic relationships with unpredictable partners.

— Barbara Beck, Marriage & Family Therapist in Leawood, KS
 

I worked at a non-profit for domestic and sexual violence survivors for the first several years of my career, wat which time I was trained in crisis counseling and safety planning. I now utilize these skills along with EMDR and other approaches to process various types of abuse.

— Elisa Colera, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

Many women haven’t told anyone about their assault before coming to our office. They have had no safe place to process their range of emotions and have needed to push down their memories and feelings over the years in order to survive and function at school, work and life. At Thrive, we give you the space and the tools to take back your life story, turn shame into self-love and confidence, and to heal your relationship with yourself and others. Your assault doesn’t have define you or limit you.

— Carol Ciancutti, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in , NY