Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP)

AEDP was developed by Dr. Diana Fosha and borrows from many common therapeutic methods, including body-focused therapy, attachment theory, and neuroscience. The aim of AEDP is to help clients replace negative coping mechanisms by teaching them the positive skills they need to handle painful emotional traumas. Dr. Fosha’s approach is grounded in a creating a secure attachment relationship between the client and the therapist and the belief that the desire to heal and grow is wired-in to us as human beings. Think this approach may work for you? Contact one of TherapyDen’s AEDP specialists today to try it out.

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AEDP seeks to create change through the undoing of aloneness that can occur from the consequences of the limitations of human relationships. AEDP has roots in interpersonal neurobiology, attachment theory, emotion theory, and body-focused approaches. The focus is to foster new and healing experiences and with these experiences, gain resources, resilience, and a renewed zest for life.

— Lia Schaefer, Therapist in Seattle, WA

AEDP seeks to create change through the undoing of aloneness that can occur from the consequences of the limitations of human relationships. AEDP has roots in interpersonal neurobiology, attachment theory, emotion theory, and body-focused approaches. The focus is to foster new and healing experiences and with these experiences, gain resources, resilience, and a renewed zest for life.

— Lia Schaefer, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

We can't change the past, but we can change how we feel about the past. This form of treatment "makes neuroplasticity happen", meaning that we can actually use your brain to change your brain. AEDP safely works with emotional experiences in the here-and-now of the present moment from the understanding that we can heal and transform our life by leaning into our emotions instead of avoiding them.

— Matthew Braman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

A good add-on to CBT, AEDP helps to anchor one's thoughts and beliefs in the here and now and to help make room for new beliefs and thoughts as they arise.

— Noa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

- Have completed post-graduate training in AEDP

— Laura Morrison, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Durham, NC
 

We need, as humans, to connect; our survival craves this at the level of food, water, and shelter. Yet we live in a world where people are profoundly lonely, separated from each other, unable to make more than unsatisfying superficial contact. My attachment-oriented work is based on Fosha's brilliant model, and I'm a member of the Denver Chapter and have presented to the group on somatic work.

— Inga Larson, Counselor in Denver, CO

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— hebano adeata, Addictions Counselor
 

The main mantra for AEDP is undoing aloneness. I seek to do this in everything I do, especially in the therapy room. I want to be a support to you as you are deepening in your awareness of self and others. I want to be beside you, experiencing with you as you ask hard questions and challenge yourself. Having an AEDP approach helps with that.

— Victoria Adams-Erickson, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate