Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) combines aspects of acceptance and mindfulness approaches with behavior-change strategies, in an effort to help clients develop psychological flexibility. Therapists and counselors who employ ACT seek to help clients identify the ways that their efforts to suppress or control emotional experiences can create barriers. When clients are able to identify these challenges, it can be easier to make positive and lasting changes. Think this approach may work for you? Contact one of TherapyDen’s ACT specialists today to try it out.

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Acceptance and Commitment therapy supports the client in accepting their current state and experiences while also working toward goals of growth and change. I help my clients to find acceptance of themselves and their lives while reaching their goals and dreams.

— Rebecca Haney, Counselor in Middletown, OH

I have gone through basic ACT training with the founder of the modality: Dr. Steven Hayes. I have completed a 4-day bootcamp, & am currently pursuing advanced training in the modality.

— Madalina Coman, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Gatos, CA
 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) encourages you to embrace your thoughts and feelings rather than fighting or feeling guilty for them. ACT develops psychological flexibility. It is a form of behavioral therapy that combines mindfulness skills with the practice of self-acceptance.

— Deena Patel, Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY

ACT can help you experience your thoughts, feelings and sensations while still doing the things you value in your life.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL
 

ACT is way of learning to tolerate and accept the truth of your present experiences, while taking intentional action toward creating change. When life is hard, it makes sense to have difficult thoughts and feelings; it makes sense to want things to be different. We'll work together, through compassionate conversation and mindfulness practice, to increase your capacity to accept these hard things. And we'll also identify action steps, no matter how small, that will create a pathway forward.

— Rachel Fernbach, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

It is not your emotions or your thoughts that are often the issue, but how we interact with our emotions and thoughts. I can help you to have a better relationship with your mind, and help you to explore thoughts and feelings in ways that are more conducive to your life goals and having a healthy and authentic life.

— Miranda Millican, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

As we were born into the human race, we were born with the right to be treated with dignity and respect. The humanistic and strengths based foundations of ACT is inclusive of my deeply held beliefs, personal and professional values that I incorporate in service to assist my clients to gain new personal perspectives and incites. I integrate multiple aspects of ACT to help you recognize your strengths, choices and to develop and grow your resiliency factors.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

By incorporating this model into therapy, I focus on a client's values. Sometimes the way we may be acting or thinking does not align with what we truly value. In using ACT skills, I try to help clients create a space for their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors to be acknowledged without judgment and to lean into identifying how helpful they may be in adding to or unhelpful they may in taking away from value-based living.

— Meagan Fischer, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Tyler, TX
 

Many studies have shown that cognitive flexibility is strongly linked with emotional well-being. ACT utilizes mindfulness-based strategies to increase flexibility and to reduce suffering.

— Jessica Magenheimer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

ACT focuses on accepting uncomfortable thoughts, feelings, and sensations and then taking committed actions that move us closer to our values. We can increase our ability to tolerate what makes us uncomfortable, create distance between ourselves and our thoughts, and live a life that is aligned with our values.

— Jamie Gordon, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

ACT is way of learning to tolerate and accept the truth of your present experiences, while taking intentional action toward creating change. When life is hard, it makes sense to have difficult thoughts and feelings; it makes sense to want things to be different. We'll work together, through compassionate conversation and mindfulness practice, to increase your capacity to accept these hard things. And we'll also identify action steps, no matter how small, that will create a pathway forward.

— Rachel Fernbach, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

ACT is about recognizing what you can and can't control, and choosing to act in a way that is consistent with who you are and what you want in life. With this type of therapy, you explore what really matters to you and then develop a commitment to those values. It's really powerful when you're dealing with things that are outside your control like chronic illness or difficult interpersonal relationships. Aspects of ACT can be integrated with other treatment approaches depending on your goals.

— Wade McDonald, Clinical Psychologist in Frisco, TX
 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is my primary treatment orientation. In ACT, my clients often work toward self-understanding and -acceptance through understanding their cognitive and emotional responses. I help clients slow their internal processes down so they can notice how, when, and why they react to the stressors in their lives the way they do. Further, from an ACT perspective, a lack of mental illness is not the only goal; instead, we work towards a life of meaning and fulfillment.

— Robert Ortega, Psychologist in Washington, DC

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA
 

In recognizing that it will take time to change systems in our world that oppress people, I find it important to find ways to find joy in day-to-day experiences in order to balance the suffering these systems cause. I will never ask a client to just accept their suffering therefore I practice ACT with cultural considerations and modifications, with the ultimate goal of helping my clients find joy in their life, despite the systems that are harmful.

— Luisa Bakhoum, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate