Adjustment Disorder

Adjustment disorder, also sometimes known as “situational depression,” is a short-term condition that occurs when a person is experiencing more stress or strain than would typically be expected in response to a change or event. It is commonly triggered by a specific stressor, like changing or losing a job, the death or illness of a loved one, undergoing a major life change (such as having a baby), or experiencing trauma in the form of a crime or disaster. The onset of adjustment disorder usually comes within three months of the triggering event and symptoms include feelings of worry, hopelessness, sadness, or anxiety. Sufferers of adjustment disorder may also experience insomnia, headaches, crying and a number of other mental or physical symptoms. The good news is that adjustment disorder is temporary and a qualified mental health practitioner can help you get through it. Contact one of TherapyDen’s adjustment disorder specialists today. 

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Meet the specialists

 

I have supported clients adjust to a variety of challenges. I enjoy supporting clients in understanding the stressors and identifying preferred ways to manage stressors in their lives.

— Miriam Collada, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

Change can be challenging for anyone. Using narrative, cognitive, and mindful approaches can help clients to manage even the most distressing changes in their life and increase their overall well-being.

— Stephanie C. Doran, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Toledo, OH
 

Especially with COVID and all of the changes that are happening as a result, adjustment disorders are on the rise.

— Dr. Denise Renye, Sex Therapist

I try to combine a use of DBT skills with loss theory and narrative therapy to help clients remember accept, and respect their past or place of adjustment as part of their life story and who they are today. Present thinking and mindfulness is encouraged to feel their experience and process it. Relaxation tools and self care introduced to reduce help anticipatory stress of change.

— Jodi Merlino, Clinical Social Worker in Islandia, NY
 

Anxiety, depression, irritability - these are all things that affect the quality of our daily lives. We work to help you cope with stressors and life events causing distress while helping you heal and find relief from symptoms you experience.

— Laura Jennings, Clinical Social Worker in CANTON, MI

There’s no denying that life often presents us with our fair share of challenges, usually in the form of sudden change. These life transitions, even the positive ones, can throw us into a tailspin and leave us feeling stressed, confused and vulnerable. But with the right tools and mindset, you have the power to not only overcome any adversity but also transform into a more authentic and confident version of yourself.

— Jessica Clark, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in El Dorado Hills, CA
 

We treat adjustment disorders young adults may be experiencing.

— U ARE HEARD, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Avon, CT

Adjustment Disorder is a common and oftentimes underdiagnosed disorder. In my work I encounter many clients suffering from rapid and overwhelming transitions in their life which can cause stress, anxiety or depressive symptoms. This disorder can oftentimes influence and changed ones self-esteem and perception of self. My clients and I work through adjustment disorder by processing feelings associated with these transitions and see them as change rather than a disruption.

— Artur Lebiedzinski, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

It's often in transitions that we find the parts of us who need more attention or support. Internal Family Systems (IFS) therapy helps us address the parts of us experiencing concerns, which may arise in the form of panic, depression, anxiety, confusion, dissociation, anger, numbness, or resistance. These reactions are "trailheads" that will lead us to find lost, vulnerable parts of ourselves. Reclaiming these parts and their energy moves us successfully through to the other side.

— Prudence Tippins, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Viroqua, WI

Life is uncertain, and we may thrive in some changes in life like an epic hero, but some changes might leave us disrupted and feeling shipwrecked and lost. If a stressful event has derailed you from your life, I will work with you so you can experience healing and restored energy. Common events that result in adjustment disorder are issues of identity, moving, birth, death, graduation, termination, marriage, breakup, sobriety, sexual activity, and any other of life's endless stressors.

— Marc Heuser, Counselor in Golden, CO
 

What's an adjustment disorder? It's a way to capture those times when an identifiable stressor is causing symptoms that aren't truly diagnosable as a long-term"disorder". If your family is going through a time of transition (i.e. separation/divorce, moving) and your child/teen is suddenly clingy, anxious and having nightmares - they probably haven't suddenly developed "Generalized Anxiety Disorder" but an Adjustment Disorder with Anxiety. This is a short-term (and treatable!) diagnosis.

— Laura Morlok, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in ,

Every single one of us, can at some point be diagnosed with an adjustment disorder. What is it? Well, it basically describes a time when an individual is having a tough time dealing with an identifable stressor. That sounds almost....normal. Right. Not everything needs to be pathologized (I've now hit my "big word" quota for the day). But if it's something that is causing you stress or difficulty in your life, then it matters regardless of now "normal" it may be.

— Adriana Scott-Wolf, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Rockville Centre, NY
 

Have you found that life in all its splendid, scary, overwhelming ways has you struggling to deal with adjustment to things in your life? Well, that is where I come in. I help you find a way to deal with them when you are becoming overwhelmed.

— Bonnie Wright-Robinson, Counselor

Changes are inevitable. The structure of our careers, families, and lives are in continual flux. For the most part, we roll with it and adapt over time. But sometimes, we get stuck. Dealing with adjustment, and what that means for our lives, even when the changes are celebratory ones, sometimes can be tougher than you expect. Professional support through these challenging times can be invaluable when you're feeling overwhelmed through the transitions of life.

— Alena Gerst, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

I try to combine a use of DBT skills with loss theory and narrative therapy to help clients remember accept, and respect their past or place of adjustment as part of their life story and who they are today. Present thinking and mindfulness is encouraged to feel their experience and process it. Relaxation tools and self care introduced to reduce help anticipatory stress of change.

— Jodi Merlino, Clinical Social Worker in Islandia, NY