Aging Concerns

It is not uncommon to have complex emotions related to getting older. While many older people are happy and content with their lives, others may feel sad, lonely, or worried about death or illness. Older adults (or adults of any age) with concerns related to aging, like most populations, can benefit from the care of an experienced mental health professional. If you have aging concerns, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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When you find yourself or someone that you love at this stage in the journey, it can feel overwhelming. We spend so much of our lives thinking about how we want to live, but we don’t spend time preparing for death and dying. Even though it is a natural life change that we will all experience, it can be frightening to think about death or what life will be like after the loss of a loved one – there can be strong emotions, fears, and maybe even some regrets.

— Crystal Bettenhausen-Bubulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Coronado, CA

As a former medical social worker in hospice care, I possess extensive experience with aging concerns, having worked intimately with elderly patients and their families during one of the most critical phases of life. My role involved providing psychosocial support, counseling, and resources to address the complex emotional, social, and practical needs that arise at the end of life.

— Natalie Khan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Parker, CO
 

I would imagine almost everyone experiences challenges at some point in their life related to transitions. From teenagers figuring out who they are and what they believe to those in mid-life wondering if they are on the best path to retirees asking, "What now?" as they face an empty nest, I work with people as they navigate life stages and reimagine their personal identities.

— Kristi Cash White, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I assist people as they negotiate the 2nd half of life. I drawing on experience including +Multiple practica, internships and post-docs serving elders +Retirement plan administrator, retirement counselor, career counselor +Geropsychology provider in outpatient and inpatient settings

— Seth Williams, Psychologist in Corvallis, OR
 

Our needs can vary greatly as we age, and folks over 60 years old have unique needs that have to be addressed in very individual ways. This is often a reflective time of life, as one perhaps transitions to retirement, having children launch into their own lives, losing loved ones, and managing family expectations with your own health and capabilities. Through therapy, we can explore these areas to ensure you are getting the most out of this new life stage.

— Debra Nelson, Clinical Psychologist in Durham, CT

Aging gay men face unique challenges that often go unacknowledged by the wider LGBTQ community. For many aging gay men, there is a sense of invisibility, as younger community members can be dismissive of their experiences. In addition, aging gay men may find it difficult to access support networks and health care resources. This can be due to a lack of understanding from service providers, or a lack of available resources specifically designed for aging gay men.

— Bob Basque, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Palm Springs, CA
 

I have worked extensively with older adults (60+) experiencing loss, declining health, and general adjustment to aging and it's many implications for patients and older adults, such as memory issues, loss of strength, decreased mobility, etc.

— Bobby Rosenthal, Psychotherapist

When you find yourself or someone that you love at this stage in the journey, it can feel overwhelming. We spend so much of our lives thinking about how we want to live, but we don’t spend time preparing for death and dying. Even though it is a natural life change that we will all experience, it can be frightening to think about death or what life will be like after the loss of a loved one – there can be strong emotions, fears, and maybe even some regrets.

— Crystal Bettenhausen-Bubulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Coronado, CA
 

As we age, we tend to feel like no one can understand what we're going through because struggling as you age just isn't discussed enough. I am here to normalize your experience and help you discover meaning as you age.

— Janay Bailey, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

As a 61 year old woman, I have my personal experience of ageing. I have also worked with people experiencing Alzheimer's and dementia and their caregivers. I facilitated a group therapy for adult children caregiver's. I created and facilitate a therapy and support group Ageism and the Creative Professional for people experiencing ageism, burn out and loss and identity.

— Tracy Sondern, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

For the past 18 years, my education, experience and focus of practice is working with concerns related to aging and planning for the last phase of your life. Particular to aging is loss of independence, physical abilities, cognitive impairment, coping with pain, chronic health conditions, feeling overwhelmed and paralyzed by so many life changing, urgent decisions, dealing with the challenges of caregiving and facing the fears, uncertainty and stress from any life transition and the unknown.

— Tanya Carreon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO

I believe that we're never too old to change. Whether you are feeling unsatisfied in life, have relationships you'd like to improve, or are experiencing physical illness or pain, therapy can help you achieve your goals. Prioritize self-care, gain alternative perspectives, learn how to optimize communication, and rediscover joy.

— Felicia Greenfield, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Philadelphia, PA
 

My graduate degree is specialized in Aging. I have experience working on a Geriatric rehab team and Alzheimer's and Dementia clinic. I have years of experience working with clients and families to place older adults in long term care, assisted living and senior housing. I understand the strong emotions for the client and family members during this transition. Feelings of stress, family disagreements, loneliness, depression are all common during this stage of life.

— Lindsey Blades, Clinical Social Worker in Annapolis, MD

I have a special interest in concerns around aging and life transitions when clients are or near retirement.

— Jamie King, Clinical Social Worker in Andover, MA
 

Many people experience anxiety and depression about growing older, changing, and dying. Common aging concerns include changes in mobility and athleticism, increases in bodily aches and pains, menopause, and anxiety over wrinkles, skin sagging, and changing body composition. Other aging dilemmas include longing for the past, fear of the future, regrets, worries about not reaching one's potential, and FOMO (fear of missing out).

— Lauren Hunter, Psychotherapist in New Orleans, LA

I work with several individuals (both male and female) ranging from the ages of 60 to 74 years of age. Together we are building healthy and trusting relationships that allow them to be seen, heard, understood, and validated for who and where they are, where they have been, and what they have experienced in their life.

— Jon Soileau, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Kansas City, MO
 

You may be facing health concerns, adjusting to retirement, or seeking meaning in later life. Embracing the journey of aging can be both enriching and challenging. Let's work together to foster resilience, promote well-being, and celebrate the wisdom that comes with age.

— Judy Huang, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

I've worked as a critical care social worker and supported patients and families in all stages of illness and change, including when it's clear that things can't continue the way they had been.

— Abbey Becker, Social Worker in Towson, MD
 

As people age they experience physical and mental health issues that need to be managed to live fully. The body does keep the score and you can't have a physical problem that doesn't also impact your mental health and vice versa. We are able to help you cope with aging issues , and to feel empowered to live your life to the fullest. Call us today as start your journey to a better future.

— Joy Johnson,