Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Dependence

Alcohol abuse or dependency (also known as alcoholism) are serious problems relating to the habitual misuse of alcohol – typically characterized by drinking too much, too often, with an inability to stop. If drinking is negatively effecting your life and relationships and you can’t seem to get it under control, you may be abusing alcohol. Other signs could include craving a drink, drinking to relax, lying about drinking, neglecting responsibilities because of drinking, hiding your drinking, and/or driving while drinking. But the good news is, you don’t have to figure it out on your own. If you or someone you know is suffering from alcohol abuse or dependency, contact one of our specialists today to get help.

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Meet the specialists

 

I received my LCADC (licensed clinical alcohol and drug counselor) in 2020 and have been working in this field since 2017.

— David Greene, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Edison, NJ

Substance Dependence is not just a one person problem. It is a family problem. I face this challenge with the addicted persons and work on helping them learn skills to stop their use and teach them how to process through past traumas that may have started their substance use issues. I also encourage family sessions to work through the sickness with everyone involved to create a stable environment.

— Alyssa Petersen, Counselor in Sioux Falls, SD
 

I use cognitive behavioral and acceptance and commitment approaches to address substance use issues. I am very familiar with the 12 step model, but do not insist that it is the only path to sobriety. There are as many approaches to recovery as there are people with substance use concerns. I will help you discover what your needs are, and how to meet those without using substances in a damaging way.

— Cassandra Walker, Counselor in ,

I have worked with clients for over a decade who struggle with alcohol and substance misuse. Clients are too beautifully complex to be reduced to their addictive behaviors. I help clients to see the contributing factors to the onset and maintenance of their addictions. Clients have a safe space to learn tools to be successful within harm reduction or abstinence approaches.

— Erin Blasdel-Gebelin, Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY
 

Do you find yourself drinking more than you would like to? Are you feeling ashamed about how much you drink or the way that you behave when you drink? Do you want to cut down, but have been unable to do so? Therapy can help, and EMDR Therapy can help you to get at the root of what is causing you to drink. EMDR is an evidenced-based treatment for trauma known for it's gentleness and effectiveness. Visit my website to learn more and set up a free 15 minute consultation. https://jenimarie.org/

— Jennifer Leupp, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA

Many individuals can experience substance use. Anxiety, fear, and hopelessness are a few emotions that can linger around substance use. We can help you work through this and guide you through the process of relapse prevention and harm reduction

— KaRon Spriggs-Bethea, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Pittsburgh, PA
 

When working with individuals on substance use, I let the client tell me what their goals are. The primary concern when working with substance use is safety, followed by health and wellness. Together we will evaluate client concerns and set treatment goals based on need. I do not assume that every individual struggling with substance use has an addiction. I have experience working in drug and alcohol treatment facilities, 12 step groups, and have familiarity with other recovery groups.

— Suzanne Cooper, Licensed Professional Counselor in Littleton, CO

Addiction holds a special place in my heart within my own recovery and as an ACOA. I've had the pleasure to work with several modalities of treatment, from 12 step to a more spiritual and Buddhist approach to help patient find their path in recovery. Together we can help you find solace from grips of your addict or help your family navigate treatment and find necessary boundaries to assist in sustainable recovery.

— Elen Redford, Addictions Counselor in McKinney, TX
 

there are 3 major factors that contribute to the development chemical dependency /addiction, 1.) heredity, 2.) environment, and 3.) access to the psycho-active alcohol or other drugs . The goals of the therapeutic intervention is to assist the individual to come to the realization that the alcohol or other drugs is progressive in nature and that it takes a support system to help manage the drug dependency. This support system includes family, friends, doctors, therapists, and support groups.

— Julia Tillie, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Fort Worth, TX

I have 27 years' experience working in addictions.

— Patrick Varney, Associate Professional Counselor in Scottsdale, AZ
 

Welcoming people in all stages of alcohol misuse and addiction recovery, I support healthy inquiry into your relationship to alcohol. Parts of this process inevitably include releasing shame about unhealthy use, finding compassionate insight in order to make changes that will ultimately help deeper healing of the root of this behavioral pattern. I welcome harm reduction and abstinence goals as well as encourage finding a path that works best for you while supporting self honesty and awareness.

— Natalie Spautz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

I have passion for working with those struggling with alcohol-related issues. I welcome clients who are in various stages of change and support 12-step, non 12-step, harm reduction and moderation. I believe alcohol use becomes a problem only when there is a bigger problem. I help my clients figure out what that bigger problem is so that they can get well. Many of my clients have achieved long-term sobriety and have changed their lives drastically - for the better.

— Kimberly Goodrich, Clinical Social Worker in Clinton, NJ
 

The journey of evaluating your relationship with alcohol and deciding if you would like to make changes, or discovering that it's challenging to make those changes, is a personal one, and different for everyone. There are also similar challenges along the way that everyone faces, and are a normal part of the process. If you find yourself questioning your drinking, or the behaviors around your drinking, I can help support you with a nonjudgmental approach.

— Christi Proffitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

Persistent challenges around emotional regulation often serve, for many attorneys, as precursors to challenges with dependency on external conditions to manifest in a certain way in order to provide a sense of safety or comfort. Often dependency can manifest in relationships, but often such a relationship may take the form of alcohol and or drug dependency.

— Mike Lubofsky, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I have spent over 30 years working voluntarily with individuals who struggle with issues of addiction and I have spent the last 2 years working with individuals clinically at an intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization treatment program. I know the 12 steps are not the answer for everyone and my experiences can help you figure out the best options to beat your addiction. I know how hard it is to stop or even seek help. Together, we can free you from the bondage of addiction.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in ORLANDO, FL

I have extensive experience working with clients in all stages of the recovery process from alcohol and other substance abuse. This includes clients who may have recently recognized problematic drinking behavior and are looking to make a change, as well as clients in more long term recovery who are looking for support. My approach counseling clients in recovery includes an understanding of 12 step programs as well as alternative and mindfulness based recovery approaches.

— Brittany Hopkins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA
 

there are 3 major factors that contribute to the development chemical dependency /addiction, 1.) heredity, 2.) environment, and 3.) access to the psycho-active alcohol or other drugs . The goals of the therapeutic intervention is to assist the individual to come to the realization that the alcohol or other drugs is progressive in nature and that it takes a support system to help manage the drug dependency. This support system includes family, friends, doctors, therapists, and support groups.

— Julia Tillie, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Fort Worth, TX