Attachment

Attachment issues, or attachment disorders, are broad terms used to describe issues resulting from a failure to form normal attachments to primary caregivers in early childhood. Most children with attachment disorders have had severe problems or difficulties in their early relationships (they may have been neglected or physically or emotionally abused). One specific attachment disorder is Reactive attachment disorder (RAD), a condition typically found in children who have received grossly negligent care and do not form a healthy emotional attachment with their primary caregivers (usually their mothers) before age 5. A mental health professional who specializes in attachment issues can be a great help to both the child and the caregiver affected. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

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I have completed foundational certification in Theraplay - a parent-child attachment enhancing play therapy. The program also builds parenting confidence and positive parenting techniques. Theraplay has been used with children on the Autistic Spectrum and who have been fostered or adopted for many years. The treatment program is typically 18-25 weekly parent-child sessions and periodic parent-only sessions. Please enquire if you would like more information and I would be glad to email a handout.

— Robyn Holmes-Cannon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

I provide a safe space for each client to share their thoughts and feelings in a non-judgmental, supportive environment. Along with that, we will take a look at your earlier years and how it has impacted your relationships with family, friends, romantic partners, and other areas in your life.

— Francesca Battaglia, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

Attachment informs the foundation to our relationships in life from our intimate relationships, friendships, familial relationships and ourselves as parents. I love supporting people through developing more secure attachment with themselves and having positive ripples into all of their relationships. From supporting new mothers as our attachment patterns start to show in surprisingly new way, to young women who are wanting to find more joy in their lives, attachment can provide helpful insight.

— Jessica Dyer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

How you Do One Thing is How you do EVERYTHING. How You relate with Your Therapist provides a glimpse into your relationships with EVERYONE, especially those close -family, friends, intimate partners. Together we become keenly aware of how you Connect AND where you tend to Disconnect -- for very good reasons - with people who you want to know on a Deeper level, but are afraid of being rejected or abandoned by them. This work will put you in the driver's seat in your relationship lane!

— Randi Kofsky, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Therapy can be a powerful tool for every age and every stage of life, and our initial familial relationships serve as a foundation for all subsequent relationships that are formed throughout our lifetimes. An integral part of my process as a psychotherapist is to give individuals the tools needed to manage their emotions and communicate effectively with care and compassion, especially through life’s biggest challenges by way of right brain healing and attunement.

— Ariel VanDoren, Licensed Professional Counselor in Washington, DC

Therapy can be a powerful tool for every age and every stage of life, and our initial familial relationships serve as a foundation for all subsequent relationships that are formed throughout our lifetimes. An integral part of my process as a psychotherapist is to give individuals the tools needed to manage their emotions and communicate effectively with care and compassion, especially through life’s biggest challenges by way of right brain healing and attunement.

— Ariel VanDoren, Licensed Professional Counselor in Washington, DC
 

I believe that attachment forms the basis of how we relate to each other as well as how we relate to ourselves. I have taken several trainings on attachment theory and its utilization in practice. Additionally, I work with a supervisor who comes from an attachment-based lens.

— Kiley Ellefson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern

A lot of people experience trauma within their family of origin. I work with developmental (also known as complex) and attachment (ways of learning how to emotionally bond) trauma which includes growing up in alcoholism, abuse, conflict, parent death and/or any traumatic experience endured during childhood. As a result, a lot of people develop a type of insecure attachment that impacts their current relationships (i.e. dependency, fear, conflict, anxiety).

— Natalie Stemati, Psychologist in Denver, CO
 

In my work with childhood issues; much of what I've seen throughout treatment leads me back to a rupture of attachment with a primary caregiver. I am passionate about learning more about infant/toddler mental health; serving those who would like to heal broken familial connections.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

I've worked for the past 8 years with clients on Attachment issues and how it affects their relationships. I've also done extensive therapy for my own attachment issues and taken several CEUs on attachment work.

— Anne Crawford, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I'm immensely passionate about attachment theory, attachment parenting, attachment styles and helping clients resolve attachment wounds/trauma. Being social creatures, it makes sense that our relationships can "make or break us." Unfortunately, many of us carry wounds from broken attachments and as a result make choices that go against our own best interest or hurt others. When we understand attachment and how it has impacted us, we can know ourselves deeper and heal.

— Jennifer Dolphin, Licensed Professional Counselor in Anchorage, AK

I have completed 2 years psychoanalytic psychotherapy training with at the Minnesota Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. It's primary focus is on relationships and how they affect who we are or believe we are in the world, with others and with ourselves. I am passionate about relational work and how "symptoms" crop up as a way to help us adjust to both old and new experiences.

— Patricia Holdahl, Psychotherapist in Edina, MN
 

How safe we felt with our original caregivers directly determines the kinds of attachments we have in our adult relationships. Being able to identify your attachment style (i.e. anxious, disorganized, secure) is a direct blueprint to navigating vulnerabilities in current relationships.

— Julie Morgavi, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Tarzana, CA

Attachment is the basis of everything in our lives. I have done extensive work with attachment in all areas including parent - child, child-parent, partner-partner etc. By healing attachment issues, many other mental health needs are relieved or lessened.

— Lindsey King, Counselor in Philadelphia, PA
 

It is my belief that attachment style formulates from childhood and can be influenced and repaired well into our senior years. Creating a consistent trusting safe haven space for a client to experience a new way of being in relationship is critical. Additionally, I have participated in specific Somatic training to work with the younger physiology underneath a client's attachment style first versus from the cognitive brain. This has the potential to create longer lasting results.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

Attachment issues concern “something that happened” or “something that failed to happen” between child and parent. Children with attachment wounds can become adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and to others. They scrabble for safety in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. In therapy clients with attachment wounds develop more wholesome relationships with parts of them that were ridiculed and belittled or other parts that didn't get their needs met.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

"Attachment" refers to our relationship with dependency. If our caregivers were not emotionally attuned, physically safe, and reliably present, this can poison our ability to foster healthy dependency in adult relationships. I most often work with adult children of addicts and victims of abuse/neglect who struggle with intimacy and/or are intensely distrustful of authority figures. The attachment between client and therapist becomes a focal point of the work.

— Geoffrey Ashmun, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

I am a relational & attachment oriented therapist, meaning I frame everything I do in these paradigms. As a somatic oriented attachment therapist we will explore early issues around bonding, how they show up in the body and how they affect your current interpersonal connections. I sues safe somatic touch and movement to get us out of our heads and into the somatic mind, the body and bring safety into the attachment system.

— Erica Berman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA