Attachment Theory

Attachment theory, first developed by John Bowlby, is a psychology concept focused on the importance of attachment in relation to personal development. According to Bowlby’s theory, attachment is not a one-time event, but an ongoing process that begins at birth and continues through the first years of life. Fundamental to attachment theory is the belief that a child's relationship with the primary caregiver (usually the mother), affects their attachment style for the rest of their life. Unresolved or insecure attachment issues experienced in early childhood can have a negative impact on relationships into adulthood. A therapist who specializes in attachment theory can help.  Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

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I have training in development and attachment theory and my dissertation was on the role of attachment style and clinician self efficacy and empathy. I have also received training in Theraplay. As an adoptee and adoptive parent, i draw heavily from attachment theory in my own life and am particularly drawn to the work of John Bowlby. Attachment theory impact social psychology, evolutionary psychology and clinical psychology.

— Gina/GinaMarie Dattilo, Psychologist in Exton, PA

I completed a post-grad program at Denver Family Institute that resulted in a certificate in Marriage/Couples and Family Therapy. During my 3.5 years at Denver Family Institute, I received instruction on a variety of attachment theories. I have worked with many clients over my 5 years as a therapist, using attachment theories to help them understand themselves and others by thoughtfully examining behaviors and reflecting on both past and present, significant relationships.

— Ashley Gray, Social Worker in Arvada, CO
 

Many of us have not received the love, comfort, and understanding that we need. This often occurred early in life, and that has set us up for pain in the ways we try to relate to others and get our needs met in relationship. You may have heard of the "anxious attachment style" or the "avoidant attachment style." My interest in working with you would be to create a safe place to be authentically you, no matter what. I do this by listening to you as deeply as I can, tending to you, being with you.

— Lisa Wenninger, Counselor in teletherapy only, CA

I believe our early attachment relationships inform our adult relationships and view of the world.

— Sarah McCune, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Denver, CO
 

Attachment theory is a psychological, evolutionary and ethological theory concerning relationships between humans. The most important tenet is that young children need to develop a relationship with at least one primary caregiver for normal social and emotional development. (Wikipedia) Those that do not develop this strong attachment may find various psychological, psycho-sexual and/or interpersonal difficulties in their lives. Understanding their attachment can help resolve issues.

— Jessica VerBout, Marriage & Family Therapist in Minnetonka, MN

How we felt with our original caregivers can become a blueprint for relationships in our adult lives. Struggling in relationships with others is a common reason why people come to therapy. But the good news is that how we exist with others is a learned behavior--which means it can also be unlearned. Let's partner together to understand your attachment traumas and styles, and from there do work that both honors where you've been and makes room for where you want to go.

— Shae Loucks, Psychotherapist
 

Our relationships are profoundly affected by our relationships with our first care givers. I will help you unpack these experiences and become aware of how these experiences affect you currently. This knowledge will help you make important changes in your life and contribute to feeling more fulfilled in relationships.

— Ruth Millican, Psychologist in San diego, CA

Attachment theory is one of the keys to understanding yourself and your patterns in relationships. Attachment work in therapy is crucial to helping you strengthen the relationship you have with yourself and with other people. Working on attachment issues can help relationships make more sense and flow with more ease. This work is a game changer when it comes to finding and maintaining healthy, satisfying, long-lasting relationships.

— Julia Lehrman, Psychotherapist
 

We offer Attachment Assessments to help you uncover and explore your attachment style. We also utilize Attachment Theory in psychotherapy to find connections between your early life and difficult present experiences.

— Spaces Therapy, Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Over the past several years, I have found that exploring the theory of Attachment with some of my clients can help us understand the relational dynamics through our ongoing relationships such as; family, life-long friends, and thier romantic relationships, to name a few. Attachment theory can be very insightful, as it helps us see how we relate to the world and how we perceive other people in our lives.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

How we show up in relationships can be greatly impacted by how we were treated and cared for as young children. Attachment theory teaches that how we participate in relationships, both romantic and platonic, is affected by how we were treated as children. I help clients learn how to be in relationships that are both healthy and honoring to who they are. As humans, we are created to be in deep and meaningful relationships and I can help clients have them.

— Jessica Warburton, Professional Counselor Associate in Tigard, OR

Attachment-Based Family works by rebuilding trust within the parent-child relationship—providing a solid foundation that promotes authentic connection and enhances teen mental health. This type of family counseling provides a clear path to achieving what both parents and children want most: closer, more meaningful relationships with one another. As a result, teens feel safe turning to their parents for support—and that leads to improvements in teen mental health and reductions in suicide risk.

— Newport Academy, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Orange, CA
 

Attachment is at the heart of how we form connections with one another. It informs the way we perceive ourselves and others. I have read books on Attachment Theory, encountered coursework in applying attachment theory in therapy, and use Attachment Theory in order to help individuals and those in relationships find clarity in why they are experiencing the disruptions that they are and practice steps to earn secure attachment with one another.

— Xuan Ho, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate

Like Family Systems Theory, I use Attachment Theory as a way to help clients process their relationships to their parents and their partners. This approach I use less frequently, but it is something I employ when there is significant anxiety around relationships with parents or partners.

— Meg Six, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Grand Rapids, MI
 

How we felt with our original caregivers can become a blueprint for relationships in our adult lives. Struggling in relationships with others is a common reason why people come to therapy. But the good news is that how we exist with others is a learned behavior--which means it can also be unlearned. Let's partner together to understand your attachment traumas and styles, and from there do work that both honors where you've been and makes room for where you want to go.

— Shae Loucks, Psychotherapist