Body Image Issues

Body image is how you see yourself when you picture yourself in your mind or when look in the mirror. Most people worry about how we look occasionally or see at least one aspect of our physical appearance we don’t like. But for some, these occasional thoughts can become frequent and disruptive. People with negative body image issues may avoid social situations and experience problems in relationships, depression, anger, anxiety, isolation, self-loathing and/or an obsession with weight loss. Body Dysmorphic Disorder (or BDD) is one example of a body-image disorder, characterized by persistent and intrusive preoccupations with an imagined or slight defect in one's appearance. The good news is that body image can be changed and BDD can be treated. Contact one of TherapyDen’s body image issues experts for help today!

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Our society encourages us to feel bad about our bodies. Together, we will find ways for you to accept yourself as you are. I will encourage you to focus on what your body can do instead of what it “should” look like. I will support you in pursuing better health at any size while feeling happier in your own skin.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA

I have advance study in Health at Every Size (HAES) and intuitive eating and run Body Image Support Group.

— Kat Polmear, Therapist in Royal Oak, MI
 

Constantly criticizing our looks and having persistent low self-esteem in our appearance seems to be a norm in our culture. Finding freedom from our own negative beliefs can be the biggest act of kindness you give yourself.

— Allison Doyle, Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA

Body-oddy -oddy. Let's talk about your relationship with your body without shame. I want to help create a space for you to explore your body's needs and desires. Fat bodies are demonized, and individuals are made to feel that what they have to offer is directly tied to a number on the scale. But listen, there is pride at every size and there is Health at Every Size.

— Arianna Wheat, Creative Art Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Body-oddy-oddy. Let's talk about your relationship with your body without shame. What are your desires? What brings your body pleasure? Fat-bodied individuals are made to feel that what they have to offer is directly tied to a number on the scale. But your value, desirability, your strength, and your creativity are not determined by your weight. There is pride at every size and there is Health at Every Size.

— Arianna Wheat, Creative Art Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As a HAES (Health at Every Size) practitioner, I believe strongly that community is one of the most important parts of healing our relationships with food, our selves, our feelings, and how we present in the world. I am starting a HAES group for people who self identify as small fat and larger in October 2021, for people who were AFAB (assigned female at birth), were raised female until approximately age 16, and believed themselves to be female most of that time, and now are any gender.

— T.Lee Shostack, Clinical Social Worker
 

The goal of CBT is to reduce preoccupation with perceived flaws and help the individual in treatment to develop a more realistic and positive perception of the body. CBT often involves psychoeducation, which aims to help individuals become aware of the nature of body image and of the role that certain factors play in the development of their personal body image. In therapy, individuals may be encouraged to engage in self-monitoring, often by keeping a diary, in order to become more aware of both the negative and positive thoughts and emotions regarding their body, as well as the factors that trigger them. As the therapist, I use cognitive restructuring, to help clients modify thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that may be unhealthy, and clients may become better able to accept and love their bodies as a result.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

We are told from an incredibly young age that our value and our worth are inextricably tied to our appearance. That if we don’t meet society’s standards we aren’t worthy of love, respect, or happiness. Yeah…hell no. I am a HAES-aligned, anti-diet clinician dedicated to helping women identify and unpack the toxic messages we get from diet culture. Using principles of intuitive eating, let's get you on a path towards food freedom and self-acceptance. You are enough, just as you are.

— Shani Leichter, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor
 

We live in a society that is SO hostile toward those who don't fit the traditional ideal of beauty, which, let's face it, is most of us! I practice under the principles of Health-At-Every-Size and Intuitive Eating and strongly believe one's health is not determined by one's weight. I do NOT promote diets of any kind and work with clients to improve their relationship with food and their bodies as is.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

Body-oddy -oddy. Let's talk about your relationship with your body without shame. What are your desires? What brings your body pleasure? Fat-bodied individuals are made to feel that what they have to offer is directly tied to a number on the scale. But your value, desirability, your strength, and your creativity are not determined by your weight. There is pride at every size and there is Health at Every Size.

— Arianna Wheat, Creative Art Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Too often we are told we are not good enough and we need to change how we look, sound, move etc. Entire businesses run on making us feel less than. In such a cultural environment, being ourselves fully and unapologetically is the best revolution we can engage in. I work with clients using tenets of HAES and Intuitive Eating to create tailored programs of radical self love and body diversity.

— Neil Panchmatia, Counselor in Portland, OR

disordered eating issues (including restriction, purging, binge, and emotional eating) and negative body image

— Maia Kiley, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I have been studying and treating disordered body image for most of my career and have been personally interested in fat positivity and body liberation for over a decade. I think that your relationship with food and movement and your relationship with your body often go hand in hand, and I integrate various methods of healing these relationships as we move towards body acceptance (or neutrality if that works best for you) and building a life of meaning, connection, and joy.

— Summer Forlenza, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

We live in a society that is SO hostile toward those who don't fit the traditional ideal of beauty, which, let's face it, is most of us! I practice under the principles of Health-At-Every-Size and Intuitive Eating and strongly believe one's health is NOT determined by one's weight. I do NOT promote diets of any kind and work with clients to improve their relationship with food and their bodies as is.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

I have over 3yrs experience working with body image issues, eating disorders and lessened self-confidence. I have worked in all levels of care on these issues.

— Ariel Harris, Clinical Social Worker in Raleigh, NC

Our society encourages us to feel bad about our bodies. As a fat woman, I know how difficult self-acceptance can be. Together, we will find ways for you to accept yourself as you are. I will encourage you to focus on what your body can do instead of what it “should” look like. I will support you in pursuing better health at any size while feeling happier in your own skin.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

I have over 3yrs experience working with body image issues, eating disorders and lessened self-confidence. I have worked in all levels of care on these issues.

— Ariel Harris, Clinical Social Worker in Raleigh, NC

I have worked with body image issues over the past three years, and am passionate about exploring the roots of these issues and finding a practice that encourages joyful movement, intuitive eating practices, and overall embodied living. Our bodies are intuitive, strong, wise beings that hold us over the course of our lifetimes. I’m passionate about finding ways to live with and support our bodies with as much compassion as we can muster.

— Kayla Rees, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA