Body Image Issues

Body image is how you see yourself when you picture yourself in your mind or when look in the mirror. Most people worry about how we look occasionally or see at least one aspect of our physical appearance we don’t like. But for some, these occasional thoughts can become frequent and disruptive. People with negative body image issues may avoid social situations and experience problems in relationships, depression, anger, anxiety, isolation, self-loathing and/or an obsession with weight loss. Body Dysmorphic Disorder (or BDD) is one example of a body-image disorder, characterized by persistent and intrusive preoccupations with an imagined or slight defect in one's appearance. The good news is that body image can be changed and BDD can be treated. Contact one of TherapyDen’s body image issues experts for help today!

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I love helping people improve their body image. If you have ever struggled in this way you know it can impact you emotionally, socially, and sexually. We are constantly bombarded by messaging around what a body should be and what makes a person beautiful (why is that even our goal in life?!?). I love to help people filter through the BS and move to a relationship of respect and acceptance towards their body. I believe all bodies are good bodies and deserve respect, autonomy, healing, and care.

— Celeste Smith, Marriage & Family Therapist in Tyler, TX

I assist folks in recognizing the role of diet culture and fatphobia in your specific body image concerns, working together to heal your relationship with your body and food.

— Michelle F. Moseley, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor
 

I work with clients using a Health At Every Size (HAES) approach to develop a positive body image and form self-nurturing patterns regarding food, eating, movement, and sexuality. In my work, I encourage clients to challenge all forms of oppression. These include oppressions around race, gender, and sexuality as well as about the body.

— Kaye-Ailsa Rowan, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA

I am a Health at Every Size (HAES) practitioner and a fierce advocate for body acceptance and liberation. I believe all bodies are good bodies, regardless of size, shape, or ability.

— Kirsten Cannon, Counselor in Memphis, TN
 

Our society encourages us to feel bad about our bodies. As a fat woman, I know how difficult self-acceptance can be. Together, we will find ways for you to accept yourself as you are. I will encourage you to focus on what your body can do instead of what it “should” look like. I will support you in pursuing better health at any size while feeling happier in your own skin.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA

The goal of CBT is to reduce preoccupation with perceived flaws and help the individual in treatment to develop a more realistic and positive perception of the body. CBT often involves psychoeducation, which aims to help individuals become aware of the nature of body image and of the role that certain factors play in the development of their personal body image. In therapy, individuals may be encouraged to engage in self-monitoring, often by keeping a diary, in order to become more aware of both the negative and positive thoughts and emotions regarding their body, as well as the factors that trigger them. As the therapist, I use cognitive restructuring, to help clients modify thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that may be unhealthy, and clients may become better able to accept and love their bodies as a result.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

We live in a society that is SO hostile toward those who don't fit the traditional ideal of beauty, which, let's face it, is most of us! I practice under the principles of Health-At-Every-Size and Intuitive Eating and strongly believe one's health is NOT determined by one's weight. I do NOT promote diets of any kind and work with clients to improve their relationship with food and their bodies as is.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

Our society encourages us to feel bad about our bodies. Together, we will find ways for you to accept yourself as you are. I will encourage you to focus on what your body can do instead of what it “should” look like. I will support you in pursuing better health at any size while feeling happier in your own skin.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Body-oddy -oddy. Let's talk about your relationship with your body without shame. What are your desires? What brings your body pleasure? Fat-bodied individuals are made to feel that what they have to offer is directly tied to a number on the scale. But your value, desirability, your strength, and your creativity are not determined by your weight. There is pride at every size and there is Health at Every Size.

— Arianna Wheat, Creative Art Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As women, our bodies and the changes that our bodies experience are always up for discussion. From the fluctuating numbers on a scale to feeling like certain body parts are not "appealing enough", we can be left with feelings of shame, frustration and hopelessness towards ourselves. I provide a nonjudgemental space where together, we develop tools in support of building your body confidence and establishing more of a positive relationship with your body.

— Rebecca Brown, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

The self-body relationship is core to my work with clients, as we collaborate to build a more gentle and loving connection to the cues of ones own body and the wisdom that all bodies hold for safety, connection, and a sense of well-being. I attend to body image difficulties located in ones personal experience as well as help clients challenge messages from and cope with the systemic oppression that many bodies experience.

— Miriam Gerber, Clinical Psychologist in St. Paul, MN

I work with clients to develop a positive body image and form self-nurturing patterns regarding food, eating, movement, and sexuality. In my work, I encourage clients to challenge all forms of oppression. These include oppressions around race, gender, and sexuality as well as about the body.

— Kaye-Ailsa Rowan, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA
 

Your body image is not a superficial problem. Your body is your home, a place in which you deserve to feel safe, peaceful, and connected. When you're at war with your body, your home, it can feel intolerable to move through life. My approach with body image is multifaceted, beginning with skill building to reduce high levels of daily distress, and moving toward reconnecting with the body on a soul level through movement and somatic practices.

— Chloe Cox, Psychotherapist in Irvine, CA

We live in a society that is SO hostile toward those who don't fit the traditional ideal of beauty, which, let's face it, is most of us. I practice under the principles of Health-At-Every-Size and Intuitive Eating and strongly believe one's health is not determined by one's weight. I do NOT promote diets of any kind and work with clients to improve their relationship with food and their bodies as is.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Rather than 'body image issues' I would relabel this as recovering from the anti-fatness and diet culture, as well as moving toward radical body acceptance and fat liberation. NOTE: It is beyond my experience and expertise to work with those who are experiencing significant disordered eating, body dysmorphia, recovering from eating disorders, and/or other forms of body/food/exercise-related symptoms.

— addyson Psy.D., Psychologist in Providence, RI

As women, our bodies and the changes that our bodies experience are always up for discussion. From the fluctuating numbers on a scale to feeling like certain body parts are not "appealing enough", we can be left with feelings of shame, frustration and hopelessness towards ourselves. I provide a nonjudgemental space where together, we develop tools in support of building your body confidence and establishing more of a positive relationship with your body.

— Rebecca Brown, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

We live in a society that is SO hostile toward those who don't fit the traditional ideal of beauty, which, let's face it, is most of us! I practice under the principles of Health-At-Every-Size and Intuitive Eating and strongly believe one's health is not determined by one's weight. I do NOT promote diets of any kind and work with clients to improve their relationship with food and their bodies as is.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,