Child Issues

Today’s children face a variety of unique issues. As children grow, they go through many mood and behavior changes. Although these changes can be difficult – both for the children and for the caregivers – they are usually normal, predictable and no cause for concern. However, when a child is having trouble at home, school or with friends, or is struggling to process a routine or traumatic event (for example the birth of a sibling, death of a loved one, bullying, or abuse), the help a professional may be needed. A mental health professional who specializes in child issues can be a great asset in helping a child (or their caregivers) navigate this distinctive time in their lives. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

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I help families to strengthen their connections to each other, reduce tension, and enhance the quality of their relationships. Dealing with challenging behaviors, adjusting to change, separations in the family, and simply feeling overwhelmed are common reasons families seek my support with their children. I enjoy collaborating with caregivers to troubleshoot problems and identify and implement solutions that make sense for each unique family situation.

— Laura Hetzel, Art Therapist in Philadelphia, PA

I work with children 0-5 years old using play based models. I work closely with the parent to help the understand age appropriate and developmental concerns. I help the parents with behavior modification and how to handle negative behaviors. I use different approaches that help your child respond better to you.

— Kemi Alemoh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Dimas, CA
 

I serve clients across the lifespan. However, I have significant experience working with minors ages 4 to 17 in private practice, community clinics, ADHD camps, and school settings. My approach is to "keep it real" with my tiny human clientele and integrate evidence-based interventions that fit THAT client with THEIR identities in their current life situation. I prioritize strength-based approaches and help reframe client behavior from "attention-seeking" to "connection-seeking."

— Casey Brasfield, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Winston Salem, NC

Through the use of cognitive behavioral therapy, play therapy, and biblio-therapy, caregivers, children, and the clinician figure out the root cause of the child's behavior. Treatment is a collaborative approach. Typical goals for behavioral disorders are to develop better coping skills, set better boundaries, and learn how to effectively and assertively communicate one’s feelings. My area of interest and research is how to decrease behavioral issues while increasing parental-child attachment.

— Kayla Murphy, Licensed Professional Counselor in Hoboken, NJ
 

Parents often come to my practice wondering what they can do when their child is struggling in school or finding it hard to make friends. Children develop at very different rates and it isn’t always clear when getting in trouble is something to be concerned about or just kid stuff. I offer a comprehensive suite of services and will coordinate with teachers, related service providers, pediatricians, and, of course, parents to ensure that the work we do is generalizable and effective.

— Jordan Conrad, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

Play therapy helps children by providing a safe and non-threatening environment for them to express their thoughts, feelings, and experiences safely. Through play, children can communicate and work through their emotions, develop problem-solving skills, improve self-esteem, and learn coping strategies. Play therapy allows children to process and make sense of their experiences in a developmentally appropriate way, which can lead to healing and positive behavioral changes.

— Karen Poynor, LPC, NCC, RPT, Licensed Professional Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

Your child has been struggling yet you aren't quite sure why. You have tried everything. The teachers aren't helpful because they just say the same thing over and over. Friend's don't understand, their kids seem to be perfect angels. It feels like you have done something wrong but don't know how to fix it. You have heard play therapy can be helpful but not sure how to start. Just reach out today and a therapist can guide you through this process together.

— The Attached Counseling Collective, Licensed Professional Counselor in Marietta, GA

With children, I use non-directive play therapy to build self-esteem and confidence as children are provided space to process and integrate their experiences. Sessions are tailored to meet the needs of the child as well as the parents. I also work with parents to explore their experiences and to support them through the challenges they are facing. Parents can expect a nonjudgmental and supportive space where we explore their concerns and ways to help support the child in and out of sessions. I i

— Emma Virden, Licensed Master of Social Work in Oakdale, MN
 

I serve clients across the lifespan. However, I have significant experience working with minors ages 4 to 17 in private practice, community clinics, ADHD camps, and school settings. My approach is to "keep it real" with my tiny human clientele and integrate evidence-based interventions that fit THAT client with THEIR identities in their current life situation. I prioritize strength-based approaches and help reframe client behavior from "attention-seeking" to "connection-seeking."

— Casey Brasfield, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Winston Salem, NC

Children's play therapy is a natural, self-guided, self-healing process. Using sand tray, art, games and other tools to guide and facilitate healing, I create a safe space for them to explore all aspects of their inner world.

— Nicola Gosen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bellingham, WA
 

The children I work with struggle with a range of issues including tantrums, anger management, trauma, anxiety, depression, and emotion regulation. In therapy I focus on the child's strengths as well as their struggles. I use a child-directed play therapy model which teaches children emotion regulation tools through modeling. Parent involvement is vital to a child's success in therapy and I include parents in the therapy process through coaching and parent-child interaction therapy.

— Chana Halberg, Licensed Professional Counselor Candidate in Boulder, CO

Kids are so fun and difficult to figure out. They can have "big feelings" and responses that confuse us adults. I have extensive experience with Play Therapy. Play is the language of kids and helps them identify and express their feelings, regulate emotions, learn new skills, and process current and past feelings. Whether experiencing parent separation, loss, anger, anxiety, school stress, or disconnection; play can help. I also use books, art, narrative therapy, and skill building.

— Susan Ponton, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Growing up is hard and so is being a parent. I work to help families gain insight into problematic behavior to better understand their child and to strengthen their relationship. My goal is not just to alleviate immediate challenges but to equip kids with the tools they need to face future hurdles with confidence.

— Stacey Sampo, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

We treat and evaluate a large range of child issues including developmental disorders (Autism Spectrum Disorder), anxiety, video game addictions, ADHD, anger management/emotional regulation, parenting strategies, and depression.

— Quintessential Health, Clinical Psychologist in Warrington, PA
 

Child Therapy helps children under 12 years of age to work through issues of trauma, stress, emotional, and social obstacles, as well as to increase their enjoyment, relaxation, and ability to learn. I often blend play therapy with cognitive behavioral therapy in a developmentally appropriate, meaningful way. This helps encourage children to master their fears and impulses, and promotes the development of coping skills, and changing negative behavior patterns.

— Samantha Serbin, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Austin, TX

If being a parent is difficult, being a kid is near impossible today. I am passionate about working with children and adolescents in close collaboration with parents/care-givers to assist in a myriad of issues, including anxiety, depression, school avoidance, bullying, self-esteem, divorce, co-parenting, and trauma. I utilize a unique combination of interactive play therapy, relational therapy, and EMDR (if appropriate) in order to give your child the most effective therapy experience.

— Nicole Bermensolo, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

I spent eight years as a therapist and then Assistant Director of Clinical Services at the Dallas Children's Advocacy Center working with children and non-offending caregivers that experienced neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, or witnessed a violent crime and supervising other therapists. I have extensive training and experience in child development, assessment of children, parenting, play therapy, TF-CBT, and EMDR. I am a Registered Play Therapist Supervisor.

— Leslie Boutte, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

My focus is on providing comprehensive support for children facing a range of issues, including behavioral challenges, academic struggles, emotional regulation, and transitions such as divorce or loss. I approach each child's situation with empathy and a commitment to creating a safe and nurturing environment where they can express themselves. Through a collaborative and child-centered approach, I work with children and their families to navigate challenges and enhance communication and growth.

— Sharon Pugh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Plano, TX
 

When working with kids, I create a safe and playful environment to build confidence and self-discovery. With younger children. I utilize play therapy as toys and symbols are the language they use to communicate. With teens, I focus more on their personal growth, meeting them where they are at, and collaborating on goals. With both kids and teens, I tend to use what the client is interested in to assist with therapy.

— Eric Norton, Mental Health Practitioner in Minnetonka, MN