Codependency

Codependency, sometimes referred to as “relationship addiction," describes sacrificing one’s personal needs to try to meet the needs of others. Although it is often associated with romantic relationships, codependency can be experienced in all types of close relationships, including with family and friendships.  Someone who is codependent has an extreme focus outside themselves. Their thoughts and actions revolve around other people, such as a spouse or relative or they build their identity on helping or “saving” other people. Codependents typically experience feelings of low self-esteem, anxiety and insecurity in these relationships and may also experience perfectionism and control issues. Codependent symptoms can worsen if left untreated. If you are worried that you might be codependent, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s codependency experts today!

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Have you been feeling anxious, depressed, or find that you have a hard time saying no to people? Do you find that you often end up feeling like you need to help or fix a loved one's problems? Do you struggle with boundaries, people pleasing and unbalanced relationships? You don't have to do this alone. Having a therapist that's experienced in codependency treatment will support you in addressing underlying issues that have been keeping you stuck.

— Jennifer Leupp, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA

Codependency is often tied to the relationships that we have with addicts in our lives. Codependency is often defined as behaviors that enable behaviors we wish to see the end of but it often comes from a place of love, care and concern for others. The problem is that love, care and concern can result in giving too much to others. My goal in helping clients who struggle with codependency is to help them establish healthy boundaries so they can be supportive without overwhelming themselves.

— Aaron Bachler, Counselor in Tempe, AZ
 

Working with your inner child, address emotional triggers, gain insights into thought patterns and behaviors that are routed in fear. Reclaim your sense of safety, stability and joy, make choices for yourself that are motivated from self care and let go of people pleasing and guilt.

— Anne Rodic, Counselor in Pittsford, NY

Highly-Sensitive, Empath, People-Pleaser are all labels describing personality traits that will keep you stuck living your life as a victim. If you are relating to this characterization, it's time to untangle yourself from the past that formed this way of being. With gentle compassionate nudging, together we will give voice to the part of yourself that is dying to be heard.

— Cynthia Eddings, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Codependency is one of the most silently destructive addictions because it is a form of compulsive self-neglect that is culturally supported in helping professions, religious communities etc. I often see a widening gap between the external validation codependents receive and the internal exhaustion and self-alienation that grow over time. Codependents are often deeply inhibited and unfulfilled, quietly resentful of loved ones, and afraid to speak their truth.

— Geoffrey Ashmun, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

Do your relationships suck and stress you out? I mean relationships with EVERYONE: your boyfriend, girlfriend, parents, boss, etc. Are you constantly fearful of disappointing people? Or you just can't stand up for yourself no matter what? Personally, I believe this is the most difficult and terrifying issue anyone can face (but do it anyway!). This is the hidden disease of our time. I can help you find your True Self.

— Matt Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Edmond, OK
 

Are you the one who always takes care of everything? Have you had to do things for yourself most of your life? "Codependency" is a big word that doesn't have to involve substance abuse. Ironically, its most common subjects describe themselves as "independent." If thinking about someone else's problems occupies more of your time than you'd like, let's talk.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Do you spend too much time thinking about other people? Are your needs usually on the back-burner because you are worried about the needs of others in your life? Do you feel responsible for the happiness of others? If any of this resonates with you, you may have difficulty prioritizing your own needs and setting healthy boundaries in your relationships. Let’s work together to establish (or re-establish) a healthy relationship with yourself.

— Bianca Walker, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta,
 

If you have trouble with needing to externally focus on other and have a hard time focusing on and caring for yourself, I can help. I have worked with many individuals to help them to reconnect with their wants, needs and learn to keep the focus on themselves.

— Celine Redfield, Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

I deeply believe in the healing that comes from exploring our attachment wounds and addressing the resulting toxic cycles that this carries into our relationships. I've worked extensively with addiction recovery, addicted family systems and the subsequent coddpendent dynamics that ensue. I have specialty training in working with all of these populations along with personal and professional experience.

— Michelle Byrd, Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Ditch the Codependence Label - It Does Note Define You! So many people are labeled with the term “codependence” these days. It’s a great buzz word and helps people know that they take care of people in relationships over themselves. Great…now what? I help people ditch this label and actually find out why it’s difficult for you to focus more on you and why it’s engrained in you to say no to yourself and yes to others.

— Melissa Barbash, Counselor in Denver, CO

I am trained in and utilize Pia Mellody's "Developmental Immaturity" model of codependency treatment, known as Post Induction Therapy. https://www.themeadows.com/workshops/post-induction-therapy-pit/

— Aly Dearborn, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

Codependency is a term that gets thrown around a lot, but few people understand what it really means. The bottom line is that people who suffer from codependency depend on others’ validation to feel good about themselves. Because this dependence can be powerful, relationships and keeping others happy can feel like an addiction. A person with codependency believes “I can only be happy if you are happy with me.”

— Lisa Zimmerman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Silver Spring, MD

Working with your inner child, address emotional triggers, gain insights into thought patterns and behaviors that are routed in fear. Reclaim your sense of safety, stability and joy, make choices for yourself that are motivated from self care and let go of people pleasing and guilt.

— Anne Rodic, Counselor in Pittsford, NY
 

Do you have trouble with people pleasing? Always focusing on external issues or everyone else’s issues which leads to you ignoring your own needs or being able to care for yourself? I can help! We will work together to understand your relationships throughout your life to understand what led you to this place and work to chip away to build healthy boundaries and how to learn or relearn how to care for your own needs and wants.

— Emmily Weldon, Counselor in Port St. Lucie, FL

Codependency is one of the most silently destructive addictions because it is a form of self-neglect that is culturally supported in helping professions, religious communities etc. There is often a widening gap between the external validation codependents receive and the internal exhaustion and self-alienation that grow over time. Codependents are often deeply inhibited and unfulfilled, quietly resentful of loved ones, and afraid to speak their truth.

— Geoffrey Ashmun, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
 

Codependency is often tied to the relationships that we have with addicts in our lives. Codependency is often defined as behaviors that enable behaviors we wish to see the end of but it often comes from a place of love, care and concern for others. The problem is that love, care and concern can result in giving too much to others. My goal in helping clients who struggle with codependency is to help them establish healthy boundaries so they can be supportive without overwhelming themselves.

— Aaron Bachler, Counselor in Tempe, AZ

Codependency means so much more than enabling with someone you love and today this idea has expanded to include adults who may or may not have lived with an addict. Codependency can more accurately be defined as the tendency to put others needs before your own; accommodating to others to such a degree that you tend to discount or ignore your own feelings, desires and basic needs.

— Gary Alexander, Therapist in Vancouver, WA