Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a classic talk therapy technique that helps increase awareness of negative thinking in order to better handle challenging situations. In addition to helping those with mental health disorders (such as anxiety or depression), CBT is also helpful for anyone who is looking to learn how to manage stressful situations. Therapists that use CBT often have a structured program, which involves a set number of sessions. CBT is frequently paired with other treatments, such as medication, when necessary. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s CBT experts today.

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Our thoughts affect our emotions, which then affect how we show up in the world. If we can shift our thinking about our present experience, then we may be able to shift to helpful ways of viewing what we are going through. I have experience assisting clients in shifting their thinking from harmful to helpful, and using these skills to view their circumstance differently.

— Kevin Roche, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fairfax, VA

I started my career 12 years ago using strictly client centered/person centered and CBT. I have since added to my list of theoretical orientations however, CBT remains evidenced based and structured in a way that is helpful for many types of issues. It is a goal oriented and short term approach. It is an orientation that is easily used concurrently with others such as DBT or EMDR which makes it extremely versatile and effective.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO
 

At Washington Psychological Wellness, our CBT specialists work to help clients assess, recognize, and deal with problematic and dysfunctional ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving. Treatment progress is dependent on each individual’s unique circumstances and needs. You and your therapist will actively check-in to ensure that progress is being maintained and that your treatment goals, values, and hopes are being accomplished.

— Washington Psychological Wellness, Mental Health Practitioner in Gaithersburg, MD

I have an MSW from UCLA where I focused on CBT. Seeing, questioning, exploring our actions/behaviors with deeper awareness & understanding can be a window into understanding why we do what we do. We can then more clearly understand the people we have become & why & make the changes we wish to make. Our behaviors are like clues to our inner truths, that can lie below what appears on the surface even to ourselves.

— Lara Plutte, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA

I enjoy supporting clients in uncovering distorted thinking and working together to re-frame thoughts with better evidence to lower rates of mood disruption.

— Gina Holden, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sacramento, CA
 

10 years of experience using cognitive behavioral and dialectical behavioral techniques like downward arrow, the behavior chain, and core fears/beliefs. Any good therapy begins with finding the problem; and that almost always includes our thinking and past experiences. CBT and DBT are good tools to help uncover the origin of the presenting problem.

— Meredith Parker, Licensed Professional Counselor in , TX

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most studied forms of psychotherapy. It is a combination of two therapeutic approaches- cognitive therapy and behavioral therapy. CBT focuses on challenging and changing unhelpful thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes and behaviors, by improving emotional regulation. The counselor and client help to build on existing coping strategies and build new ones that target solving current problems.

— Caroline Anderson, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Ijamsville, MD
 

CBT focuses on the relationship between our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and how they interact to influence our mood, perceptions, and actions. Using CBT, we get to the core of what influences your thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. Ultimately, we work toward changing those old, self-sabotaging programs and beliefs into more effective new ones and engage in new behaviors to get what you want.

— Jerry Ochoa, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Turlock, CA

I, for several decades now, used the cognitive model to point out the misperceptions of, or erroneous thoughts about, situations, people, and life events, that influence their emotional and more importantly behavioral responses. I skillfully identify and correct these behavior creating distorted beliefs, I influence the clients processing of information, and give new corrected views of distorted thoughts, all for the purpose of having the client autonomously manage risk.

— Sexual Misbehavior Absolute Expert James Foley, Psychotherapist in New York, New York, NY
 

Can teach coping skills so you can leave each session with specific tools to practice with.

— Marc Campbell, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Orlando, FL

I feel the use of CBT therapy have the ability to restructure one's thought process and perspective. Often individuals become accustomed to seeing life from a predetermined view point, but with the use of CBT, my clients are encouraged to look at the same issue from a different view.

— Alena Garcia, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ
 

I work with individuals to identify their thought processes, and the impact of those thought processes on their emotions, behaviors, and subsequent decision-making. Within this, the client is seen as the “expert,” and the therapist is a facilitator in the process of identifying strengths for the client to build upon for self-improvement. I incorporate a direct-yet-compassionate approach to help clients make progress towards becoming their best selves.

— Dr. Lisa Pittman, Psychologist in Ashburn, VA

Cognitive behavior therapy is an evidence-based modality that I learned in graduate school and have used ever cents. It is flexible and can be adapted to almost any issue that a client faces. I bring a more spiritual orientation to my understanding of CBT. The bottom line for me is that when we change our thoughts we change our experience.

— Sarah Murphy, Counselor in Bryn Mawr, PA
 

Lived experience (especially traumatic events) impacts how we think about ourselves, the world, who we trust, how we feel, and how we act. Cognitive-behavioral therapy addresses the challenges in our thinking - based on these lived experiences - so that we can ultimately regain a sense that we are in control of our feelings, and that our actions align with our personal strengths, values, hopes, goals, and are authentic to us as individuals.

— Jennifer Warner, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL