Collaborative Couple Therapy

Collaborative couple therapy is a therapeutic technique that helps couples understand how they communicate when struggling with an issue or argument. The focus of collaborative couple therapy is teaching partners how to turn those fights into intimate conversations, and in turn, strengthen the relationship. In collaborative couple therapy, the therapist will sit in between the couple and speak as if they were one of the partners talking to the other. If one of the partners is 'fighting' by using stinging words, the therapist will attempt to translate those comments into confiding thoughts. If a partner is ‘withdrawing,’ the therapist will guess at what the individual is feeling, and ask if the guesses are correct. A successful outcome of collaborative couple therapy is experiencing intimacy in times of struggle, rather than fighting or withdrawing. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s collaborative couple therapy experts today. 

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Meet the specialists

 

A large majority of my client base is couples. I am currently working as a marriage therapist at The Relationship Institute in Royal Oak, Michigan.

— Leticia Berg, Psychotherapist in Ann Arbor, MI

Problems tend to form through miscommunication. The collaborative approach helps everyone feel heard and understood. As a result, communication begins to improve, and problems start to dissolve.

— Katherine Traxler-LaFrance, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Humble, TX
 

It's not you against each other, but all of us against the problems. I love working with partners committed to getting on the same team and working together to understand one another in order to move through their problems. I take a collaborative approach in relationship therapy because I want to help you build the type of partnerships you desire! Each of us has unique values, needs and hopes. Let's build the kind of relationship that works for everyone.

— Robin Roemer, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

It's not you against each other, but all of us against the problems. I love working with partners committed to getting on the same team and working together to understand one another in order to move through their problems. I take a collaborative approach in relationship therapy because I want to help you build the type of partnerships you desire! Each of us has unique values, needs and hopes. Let's build the kind of relationship that works for everyone.

— Robin Roemer, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

It's not you against each other, but all of us against the problems. I love working with partners committed to getting on the same team and working together to understand one another in order to move through their problems. I take a collaborative approach in relationship therapy because I want to help you build the type of partnerships you desire! Each of us has unique values, needs and hopes. Let's build the kind of relationship that works for everyone.

— Robin Roemer, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

It's not you against each other, but all of us against the problems. I love working with partners committed to getting on the same team and working together to understand one another in order to move through their problems. I take a collaborative approach in relationship therapy because I want to help you build the type of partnerships you desire! Each of us has unique values, needs and hopes. Let's build the kind of relationship that works for everyone.

— Robin Roemer, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

CCT is designed for couples who may be struggling with patterns of conflict in their relationship. The focus of CCT is helping partners work together in a collaborative way to solve problems and improve their relationship in the process. CCT therapists see a fight between partners as an opportunity for a conversation.

— Amy Studer, Licensed Professional Counselor in , MO

We as individuals form our unique worldviews by the attachment styles we develop with our parents and by the dynamics of our family relationships, friendships, and romantic partnerships throughout our lives. I work collaboratively in partnership with you, honoring your worldview, to recognize what’s going well in your relationship dynamic, explore where and how you and your relationships can grow, and assisting you in deepening connection with your loved ones.

— Shelly Hogan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

I love working with couples to support them in finding their path and helping them to learn each other's languages of communication. We all come from drastically differing experiences as human beings, and the work of bringing two worlds together can be incredibly difficult and frustrating, and it can also be full of joy and excitement. I am here to guide you through it all. I am a sex positive, LGBTQIA+ welcoming therapist who orients towards liberation psychology and theories of attachment.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

In working together, I utilize a person-centered, integrative and collaborative approach to therapy, with the understanding that each person is distinctive and individual. My goal is to meet clients where they are and to create a comfortable, safe space for growth, exploration and self-healing.

— Gary Reeves, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

I encourage couples to both participate and to practice techniques that are appropriate and helpful to improving the relationship. Success is dependent on both partners buying in to the plan and homework.

— Gwenette James, Mental Health Counselor in wickliffe, OH

If you're tired of faking a smile to get through the day, or can't wait for bed as soon as you wake up, I want to help. I take a realistic, down to earth approach to highlight my client's strengths while understanding their difficulties; providing them with valuable tools to independently use for years to come.

— Heather Agid, Addictions Counselor in Hartford, CT
 

Queer people have historically been harmed by mental health care as an institution, and continue to be in many ways. I am well aware of this and I integrate collaborative therapy into my practice to help create a collaborative, transparent, and egalitarian space in the therapy room so that my clients can trust the process and that therapy is a truly safe space for them.

— Kalen Zeiger, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Hiawatha, IA

CCT-collaborative Couples Therapy is the approach that I use and I focus on the joint participation of both partners in therapy to address relationship challenges. It emphasizes creating a collaborative and respectful environment where both partners feel heard, validated, and each person is actively involved in the therapeutic process.

— Galina Litvin, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Ramon, CA
 

I believe that the core of a relationship is connection. I will use the strengths of the couple to assist the couple in collaborating on conflict resolution. In my experience, couples tend to get stuck on opposing forces, rather than learning how to work together as a support system to work through happy times, sad times, and all the times in between.

— Jeremy Hartke, Counselor