Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

I work with clients in a collaborative relationship to identify goals for therapy and treatment or growth plan. Together, we will identify what will be helpful, to explore how you relate to yourself (your thoughts, feelings, body, identity), the context within which you live, and how the heck to manage the societal structures we have to navigate. As a therapist I aim to practice with cultural humility, and will educate myself on topics important to you.

— Cat Salemi, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in ,

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

My counseling approach is warm, supportive, and encourages clients to connect with their inner child to unlearn the internalized oppressive messages that result from life, on a micro and macro level; with the belief that unlearning these messages can empower folx into moving forward and reclaiming their lives.

— Lilith Halpe, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

As a gender queer, anti-zionist, Jewish psychologist, I integrate understanding of my own identities and positions into my work. Some clients enjoy talking about identity, power, privilege, and oppression as a central part of their work with me. Others prefer to trust that it is something that I am always considering and will weave into their treatment throughout the process. I am happy to work either way and see this as part of providing trauma-informed care.

— Rebecca Cohen, Clinical Psychologist in Hamden, CT
 

From the very beginning there are expectations that are projected onto each one of us by the outside world and our family systems. Expectations of how we should or should not act, feel, love, do, pursue, or be. This often is a source of decreased mental health symptoms. I believe it is important to talk about our differences, you are the expert of your experiences. I lead with honest curiosity and open understanding in order to validate your inner world and perspective.

— Nicole David, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

I welcome where you are from or whatever cultural background you have. I believe everyone has their own unique story and therapy sessions need to be customized based on individual backgrounds, cultures and needs

— Bitna Lee, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

Social justice and advocacy are core pieces to a therapist's identity. They have to be able to navigate complex cultural issues that transcend race and cultural identity. These issues are often the source of a lot of the issues our clients are struggling, and a therapist must be able to identify the impact of culture and identity on the presenting issue.

— Saara Amri, Licensed Professional Counselor in Springfield, VA

Completed multiple trainings in providing culturally responsive treatment across a variety of settings to include children, adults, adolescents of multiple ethnicities.

— Patricia Arce, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oceanside, CA
 

It is important for me to be culturally sensitive in my work as I have worked and will continue to work with people from different cultural backgrounds, values and traditions. Learning, respecting and implementing this into the therapeutic relationship is most important for clients to receive the highest benefit of services and feel seen, heard and understood. I am not an expert on all cultures but I am sensitive to cultural differences that will be welcomed and discussed as needed.

— Olamide Margarucci, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

Based upon your unique pieces of diversity (e.g., age, gender, race, class, etc.) I work to uncover how to view these from a place of agency and strength; in your home, work and social spheres. Each of us have aspects of our identity which we aren't nurturing to the fullest of our ability.

— Eldridge Greer, Clinical Psychologist in Denver, CO
 

Alison is a native New Yorker and believes understanding a client’s background and belief system is paramount for optimal treatment as it relates to race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, or other important elements of culture and/or identity.

— Alison Cunningham-Goldberg, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

I think this is a key foundation to any therapy.

— Heather Tahler, Psychologist
 

I welcome where you are from or whatever cultural background you have. I believe everyone has their own unique story and therapy sessions need to be customized based on individual backgrounds, cultures and needs

— Bitna Lee, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Alison has a background in providing psychotherapy in an urban setting at a major hospital in Bronx, NY. Alison strongly believes understanding a client’s background and belief system is paramount for optimal treatment as it relates to race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, or other important elements of culture and/or identity.

— Alison Cunningham-Goldberg, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

I believe that context matters, and recognize that each individual exists in a larger system (family system, cultural context, etc). I am curious about how issues that present themselves in therapy may be informed by these larger contexts and systems, which also includes an awareness of issues related to power, privilege, and marginalization. I bring this curiosity with me, while honoring you as the expert in your own experience.

— Dr. Luana Bessa, Psychologist in Boston, MA

All of us are conditioned by our surroundings — our families, communities, societies, culture — without exceptions. No matter your creed, gender, colour, etc., we carry experiences from our past, tinted by the world around us. Understanding who we are requires understanding these influences; otherwise, we cannot tease out who we are at our "core," from what we've been taught. Even if there is overlap, there is also a difference! I look forward to sifting through the layers with you.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

I am a queer, feminist therapist and coming from a systems background, believe that the environments and systems we are surviving within impact our sense of safety and our sense of self. I work hard to deconstruct and unpack the ways our shitty cultural norms negatively impact my clients and connect them back to an internalized sense of self-worth, self-esteem, self-validation, and safety.

— Ginelle Guckenburg, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA