Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Offer non-judgemental space with an emphasis on respect for differences in opinions, values, and attitudes of various cultures and different types of people.

— Tracey Davis, Social Worker in Dallas, TX

My practice is professional, supportive, direct, and affirming. I welcome clients of all of race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, sexual expression, physical ability, relationship structure, and religious affiliation. Your mental health and sexual wellness matters. I bring my experience as a mother, spouse, career professional into my sessions. I meet you where you are, listen deeply, and empower you on your healing journey.

— Stacey Wright, Psychotherapist in Tucker, GA
 

Cultural backgrounds have an enormous effect on the ways in which we operate in relationships (both with ourselves and others), work, school, and in the world at large. It is crucial to understand the influences that are present in your life in order to understand who you are, how you feel, and what you want to create in your life. It is possible to exist in the world in a powerful way despite the ways in which your identities may be marginalized. I can help you do that.

— Jennie Wang-Hall, Psychologist in San Marcos, CA

This is probably the best term to describe an awareness of privilege and oppression in my work, navigating those pieces as they arise in my work with individuals from various backgrounds and lived experiences, those managing microaggressions and experiencing oppression related to their intersecting identities, and still aiming to create understanding and a healing space for them to feel heard, understood, cared for, and not have to explain everything about their background or be stereotyped.

— addyson tucker, Psychologist in Providence, RI
 

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO

Part of the reason for starting my company came through the understanding that I cannot help everyone in a culturally aware way as a heterosexual white woman. Having people work with a therapist they feel connected and safe with is the first priority, so real support and change can occur. The only way that is possible is through connecting a diverse group of therapists and offering the choice to the person seeking support. They can ask for what they need and find the person who fits those needs.

— Emery Mikel, Therapist in New York, NY
 

All of us are conditioned by our surroundings — our families, communities, societies, culture — without exceptions. No matter your creed, gender, colour, etc., we carry experiences from our past, tinted by the world around us. Understanding who we are requires understanding these influences; otherwise, we cannot tease out who we are at our "core," from what we've been taught. Even if there is overlap, there is also a difference! I look forward to sifting through the layers with you.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA

Much of my graduate school training was in cross-cultural psychology, including understanding how culture is important in helping clients who struggle with various mental health problems. I use a cultural lens to view each of my clients and consider how culture has shaped them over time.

— Catherine Bitney, Clinical Psychologist in Austin, TX
 

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO

As a person of color, I draw upon my own culturally-informed experience to understanding and working with multicultural issues. I have taught classes and presentations on multi-cultural issues and I have held support groups for marginalized populations and have pursued continuing education in culturally-informed clinical approaches. I combined my multi-cultural education, training, and personal experience to support and facilitate the exploration and healing within marginalized communities.

— Augustino-Chloe Tierramar, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

My work as a therapist and assessor is to see each patient in the context of our communities and their many identities. I aim to be culturally aware of possible difference while making space for each individual's self expression. Cultural responsivity is a life long journey. I aspire to continually learn about myself and the communities around me.

— Kristen Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Oakland, CA

More westernized modalities focus on symptoms, whereas other cultures may include other facets of life like one's story and legacy. Communal trauma exists and can influence biographical change. Without the inclusion of one's culture and communal history; it is possible that both areas of dis-ease and appropriate treatment methods may be overlooked.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

Our practice takes an anti racist stance in all the work we do. We use a social justice framework in our work, understanding that we are constantly learning, educating ourselves, and being humble about our client's needs. Often certain behaviors and beliefs are pathologized by clinicians without taking into context a person's cultural beliefs and history.

— Karen Rothstein Pineda, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Oak Park, IL

I received a great graduate and post graduate education where culturally sensitive therapy was emphasized and in addition through additional training annual training.

— Sandra Nunez, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in san diego, CA
 

I respect your beliefs, experiences and values in regards to our treatment and the life you want to live.

— Caroline Anderson, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Ijamsville, MD

We strive to provide culturally responsive and affirming services that are sensitive to the unique needs and challenges faced by marginalized communities, including Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and to gender, sexuality or relationship minorities. In our clinical work, we utilize an intersectional, culturally-grounded approach to understand dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression that have shaped our clients identities and lived experiences.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA