Dissociative Disorders

Dissociative disorders (DD) are mental conditions characterized by disturbances or breakdowns of memory, awareness, identity, or perception. Typically, dissociative disorders occur as a coping mechanism for the brain to deal with a situation too upsetting for the conscious mind to process. Dissociative disorders are thought to be primarily caused by trauma or abuse, causing the individual to escape reality in involuntary and pathological ways. They can also be caused by things like stress or substance abuse. There are three main types of dissociative disorders: 1. dissociative amnesia and/or fugue: selective amnesia of a specific time, person or event. 2. Dissociative identity disorder: an indistinct or distorted sense of identity. 3. Depersonalization disorder: a feeling of being detached from yourself. If you think you may be suffering from a dissociative disorder, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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I work with people who may experience derealization, depersonalization, and/or don't feel connected to body, space, and/or time. Dissociation is a spectrum that ranges from very mild symptoms through to forms of dissociative identify disorder. The important thing to know is this is what we humans do, you're not crazy! Some of us may need more help to feel grounded and/or present. Incorporated practices of trauma informed yoga, mindfulness can help us gently reconnect.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Whether it is one event or repeated dissociative episodes, dissociation can be frightening. Clients with dissociative problems may feel like they are robots moving through their lives, face extreme energy loss, and may have problems with memory.

— Whitney Davison, Therapist in Lee's Summit, MO

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

As a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional, my focus is on working with dissociative disorders, including Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly called "multiple personality disorder"). In this work, you and I will focus on decreasing the effects of the dissociation on your present day life rather than on remembering the details of the traumatic events, which could be re-traumatizing. We can't change the past, but we CAN change how it affects you now.

— Alicia Polk, Licensed Professional Counselor in Belton, MO

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the rest of oneself. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

I have experience with, and passion for working with people who struggle with dissociation including Dissociative Amnesia, Depersonalization / Derealization, OSDD, and Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). https://praxisthriving.com/dissociation

— Kristen Henshaw, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I work with those with dissociative disorders, and actively seek monthly consultation to ensure I am providing the best care for this population.

— Joanna Filidor, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Currently I receive supervision on working with clients with DID, and other dissociative symptoms. I work to assist the invidual in coping and grounding and decrease in crisis responses.

— Carly Wolfram, Counselor in Buffalo Grove, IL
 

Dissociative disorders are often missed in individuals. They may experience checking out, memory blanks, intense moments of anger, feeling that the world is not real, or not feeling like themselves all the time. Everyone has dissociative experiences, but some individuals are too familiar with dissociation. If dissociation is undiagnosed, it can often impede treatment progress. Knowing about your dissociation traits will help you understand your responses better and empower you in your healing!

— Heather Towndrow, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Price, UT

The world with DID can be terrifying, confusing and unmanageable, leaving most feeling scared, alone, and that life is not worth living with this condition. This condition is often misdiagnosed and patients often spend time in and out of hospitals never getting better. I specialize in helping with the correct diagnosis, and creating safety for the system making life more manageable with less symptoms. If you or a loved one may be suffering from DID due to trauma please call for more information

— Tammy Barnes, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Murfreesboro, TN
 

I am certified in trauma model therapy, which is focused on those who experience dissociation.

— Morenike Olorunnisomo, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Grapevine, TX

Mental health and medical practitioners are typically taught little about dissociation, with the effect of making it challenging, and at times, invalidating to seek support for an issue few truly understand. I'm passionate about helping people who dissociate and want you to know that I know without a doubt that DID and other dissociative issues are real. Your experience will be honored and respected, and I have the knowledge and training to help you feel whole. You, and your parts, are welcome

— Allison Gilson, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

The human mind is amazing, amirite? When we feel overwhelmed and just can.not.deal, the brain is like "OK cool, let's check out of here." There are benefits to doing that. Conversely, we might start to check out so much, we don't learn how to deal with the stress triggers, and start losing out on life. I will teach you skills that help you cope so that you can be present in your own life.

— Rashida Black, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oceanside, CA

I have presented at several trauma and dissociation conferences on the use of drama therapy with dissociative disorders.

— River Dowdy, Creative Art Therapist in Clayton, MO