Domestic Violence or Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic, or intimate partner violence, can take many forms. It is often violence used in an effort to gain and/or maintain control. Some of the more common types of domestic violence include physical abuse (hitting, pushing, hair-pulling, forced substance use), emotional abuse (insults, blame, or other methods to diminish a person's self-esteem), psychological abuse (threats, including against family, pets, friends, or the abuser themselves, stopping a partner from attending activities, or other manipulation), sexual abuse (coerced or demeaning sex acts), and financial abuse (controlling a partner's finances or restriction of financial resources like an allowance). The emotional effects of these types of abuse can be long lasting, and may cause depression, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), insomnia, emotional distance, and more. If you or someone you know is experiencing (or has experienced) abuse, a qualified therapist can help. It is also important for children who witness or experience domestic abuse to see a professional who specializes in the age group to prevent the trauma affecting adulthood and possibly perpetuating the cycle of abuse. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s abuse specialists for support today. 

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Meet the specialists

 

Working with clients that have experienced IPV will be approached with a trauma focused therapy.

— Patricia Viscaino, Licensed Professional Counselor

Getting hurt by someone you’ve cared for is especially painful. While the physical traumas can be scary as hell, the emotional traumas can take a lot more work to heal. When I work with domestic violence survivors certain themes come up over and over again. Survivors often wonder if something’s wrong with them, why this person hurt them and why they might still care for them. These are complex questions worthy of exploration. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

I have 15 years working with survivors of domestic violence and IPV. I am very passionate about empowering individuals who are either in an abusive relationship or are trying to leave one. Abuse comes in all forms and does not discriminate based on race, gender identity, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status. Everyone is entitled to be supported by a professional with the skills necessary to navigate such a delicate yet volatile situation.

— Saara Amri, Licensed Professional Counselor in Springfield, VA

DV/IPV can affect anyone--regardless of sexuality, gender, age, religion, ability, nationality, neurodivergence. I validate clients' experiences, educate on dynamics of abuse within relationships, and work with you to remain safe, whether that means while in the relationship or not.

— Jennifer Kulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , CA
 

I am an IPV/DV survivor. I went to support groups at a DV advocacy agency, and I loved the experience so much, that a few years later, I returned to the agency to run the groups as a volunteer. This inspired me to become a therapist, and now I counsel IPV/DV survivors and run counseling support groups. I help people understand what happened, and empower people to find their self-esteem to move forward. I wrote an educational memoir about my experience that is available on my website.

— Kate Mageau, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA

I have used Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy successfully in working with victims of domestic violence.

— Sandra Nunez, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

Getting hurt by someone you’ve cared for is especially painful. While the physical traumas can be scary as hell, the emotional traumas can take a lot more work to heal. When I work with domestic violence survivors certain themes come up over and over again. Survivors often wonder if something’s wrong with them, why this person hurt them and why they might still care for them. These are complex questions worthy of exploration. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Getting hurt by someone you’ve cared for is especially painful. While the physical traumas can be scary as hell, the emotional traumas can take a lot more work to heal. When I work with domestic violence survivors certain themes come up over and over again. Survivors often wonder if something’s wrong with them, why this person hurt them and why they might still care for them. These are complex questions worthy of exploration. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

Survivors of domestic violence or intimate partner violence often suffer with PTSD and anxiety symptoms. Utilizing a combination of EMDR therapy, parts work and psychotherapy I treat the individual and walk their healing journey along with them.

— Lynn Harris, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Campbell, CA

I am a qualified Domestic Violence Prevention group facilitator with eight months experience co-facilitating domestic violence prevention groups.

— Jess Callaway, Licensed Resident in Counseling in Norfolk, VA
 

Throughout my education, I have focused on domestic violence and it's impact. I have dedicated a majority of my education researching and understanding the complexities of intimate partner abuse and its effects, as well as how to help victims become survivors. In order to help victims of abuse, it is important that we create a safe and nonjudgmental environment for them so they can feel comfortable in opening up about their situation.

— Katie Robey, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Gatos, CA

I have been supporting the survivors of violent acts since I was an undergrad in college. Since 2007 I have been an advocate for those who most often feel voiceless. It is so important to provide a safe place for survivors to share their story, find safety and work to rebuild their life. I use a variety of tools to help you combat trauma and increase safety.

— Alison Murphey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Before choosing to become a therapist, I volunteered at a local DV agency, but always wanted to do more. I completed the 40-hour DV advocate training, provided childcare at the DV shelter, and volunteered on a DV hotline. As a therapist, I have worked in a DV agency, facilitating groups and counseling individuals and families affected by intimate partner violence. I also facilitate community outreach efforts of a DV agency as a volunteer.

— Mark Myran, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

Domestic violence is also known as intimate partner violence, spousal abuse, and domestic abuse. Staying in an abusive situation can have negative long-term effects. But recovery is possible. Being Clinically Certified Therapist in Domestic Abuse, I work with woman in understanding the types & cycles of abuse, creating a safety plan, and how to stay safe. I also work with children. 1 in 3 women are impacted by domestic violence in their lifetime. If you need help right away, please call 911.

— Tammie Holt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Maitland, FL
 

I began my career working as a Victim Advocate in the court system for survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and trafficking. I offered support throughout the court process and I understand how profoundly domestic violence affects our lives. I worked for years as a case manager in confidential shelters before working as a therapist. I am passionate about this work.

— Sara Fischer Sanford, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in SAN FRANCISCO, CA

I have worked on both side of domestic violence and intimate partner violence. I have provided victim centered treatment in the forensic space, as well as trauma therapy for survivors in the private space. Domestic violence is not limited to behaviors deemed illegal by the criminal justice system, but also includes emotional, verbal, and psychological abuse.

— Suzanne Cooper, Addictions Counselor in Englewood, CO, CO
 

I began my work at Peace Over Violence, a non profit organization that offered free services including therapy, crisis intervention, legal services, and more to survivors of domestic and sexual abuse. My training there educated me on the legal aspects of both, and how to best emotionally support populations who are hoping to escape, have escaped, or have long been out of abusive dynamics.

— Hannah Schollhammer, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I am a qualified domestic violence prevention group facilitator with eight months experience co-facilitating domestic violence prevention groups.

— Jess Callaway, Licensed Resident in Counseling in Norfolk, VA
 

Research shows that both men and women can be victims of domestic violence or family violence, and both can be perpetrators as well. I have developed and published a domestic violence documentation format which also serves as an interview guide to thoroughly identify all forms of domestic or family violence. I perform domestic violence evaluations in immigration cases, and I also prepare extreme hardship evaluations in immigration cases.

— Stephen Finstein, Therapist in Dallas, TX