Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

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I help clients struggling with eating disorders or any other disordered eating behaviors.

— Milena Trifunovich, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate

Once you made the choice to begin living your life again and not use your eating or lack thereof to deal with your given problems, I can show you how to do that. I can also show you how to reconnect with the different parts of you to create a more harmonious balance between what happens in life and your reactions to it. I can help you connect to your body in a way that helps you feel more centered and grounded and less chaotic and anxious. You will get your life back

— Yoni Banayan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Las Vegas, NV
 

For the past seven years, I have worked with clients struggling with eating disorders at the partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient level. After working as a milieu therapist, primary therapist, and group therapy facilitator at an eating disorder treatment center, I began working as an outpatient therapist in private practice specifically focusing on members of the LGBTQ+ community who struggle with body image and eating

— Zach Verwey, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

Eating disorders have the highest rate of mortality of all mental health disorders. Is this surprising when we look at how much diet culture has generated problems of fat phobia in society? There are so many industries who capitalize off of people feeling insecure about their body size, shape, and weight. Eating disorders are good at deceit, and I am support individuals and families become aware of the lies, fight back, and recover.

— Suzanne Sanchez, Counselor in Beaverton, OR
 

Food is one of the earliest ways we humans experience nurturance and interaction with a caring adult. food takes on many meanings about relationships, needs, control, and the value of self. The development of an eating disorder signals a problem in one or several of these areas; it arises as an attempt to solve this problem, by drawing attention to the problem, by pulling the family together to address symptoms of the eating disorder; or expressing/repressing feelings related to current problem.

— Tatum Santacasa, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

In working with me, you can expect authentic empathy and compassion for your experience, as well as a no BS approach to challenging the eating disorder. Together we will identify and target harmful behaviors, as well as investigate what might sustaining the eating disorder’s presence in your life. The goal with all of my clients is to collaboratively identify what makes life worth living, and to create roadmap to that life free from disordered eating.

— Chloe Cox, Psychotherapist in Irvine, CA
 

For the past seven years, I have worked with clients struggling with eating disorders at the partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient level. After working as a milieu therapist, primary therapist, and group therapy facilitator at an eating disorder treatment center, I began working as an outpatient therapist in private practice specifically focusing on members of the LGBTQ+ community who struggle with body image and eating disorder behaviors.

— Zach Verwey, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

Once you made the choice to begin living your life again and not use your eating or lack thereof to deal with your given problems, I can show you how to do that. I can also show you how to reconnect with the different parts of you to create a more harmonious balance between what happens in life and your reactions to it. I can help you connect to your body in a way that helps you feel more centered and grounded and less chaotic and anxious. You will get your life back and quickly too!

— Yehonatan Banayan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Brooklyn, NY
 

Eating disorders can feel hopeless, but they aren’t. Whether this is your first time seeking help, or your umpteenth time, I believe everyone can recover. There are many reasons eating disorders are invited into your life. Whether it’s perfectionism, judgment, loneliness, self-improvement, health, family issues…Just as there are many reasons why a person develops an eating disorder, the way you recover will be just as unique.

— Tessa Gordon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I have years of experience supporting individuals with eating disorders. Eating disorders are complex and multifaceted beasts and I will be there to support you as we face this beast together. I will gently and compassionately guide you towards wellness and healing by working towards ending the painful eating disorder cycle. You are stronger than you think and recovery is possible.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Are you wishing you had more peace with food, your body, yourself, and those people who are important in your life? We will work together collaboratively to help you discover who you are at your core, heal what hurts, and engage genuinely with your true self, your relationships and your life. Deep conversation, deep listening, and deep connection for your healing and transformation. Together we can work on lasting change.

— Sabrina Samedi, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Westlake Village, CA

Helping people heal from eating disorders is my passion. I myself am recovered from an eating disorder, and my own recovered therapist was instrumental in my healing process. My hope is to be that safe and trusted person for others because of my lived experience. I am fulfilling the requirements to become a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist (CEDS) under supervision to earn that distinction, and I anticipate finishing that in early 2022.

— Kirsten Cannon, Counselor in Memphis, TN
 

Many clients I have worked with who have substance use disorder ofter experienced an eating disorder as well. I have worked with many clients to heal their relationship with food and their own bodies.

— Ashley McInerney, Clinical Social Worker in Bloomfield, CT

I have over 3yrs experience working with body image issues, eating disorders and lessened self-confidence. I have worked in all levels of care on these issues.

— Ariel Harris, Clinical Social Worker in Raleigh, NC
 

I have experience working in an eating disorders program that included partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient treatment. I have completed intake assessments that included a "level of care recommendation" for eating disorder treatment based on diagnoses such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. I also have training in the "Health at Every Size" approach and seek continuing education in how nutrition and eating relate to mental health.

— Lisa Ritter, Counselor in Beaverton, OR

I have specialized in treating Eating Disorders for almost a decade. If you are currently surviving a eating disorder, it is extremely important you find a qualified, licensed therapist to assist you in the recovery process. Additionally, l am a certified Intuitive eating counselor. I take a weigh neutral approach with all my clients.

— Stark Therapy Group, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA
 

Food is one of the earliest ways we humans experience nurturance and interaction with a caring adult. food takes on many meanings about relationships, needs, control, and the value of self. The development of an eating disorder signals a problem in one or several of these areas; it arises as an attempt to solve this problem, by drawing attention to the problem, by pulling the family together to address symptoms of the eating disorder; or expressing/repressing feelings related to current problem.

— Tatum Santacasa, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

Food is one of the earliest ways we humans experience nurturance and interaction with a caring adult. food takes on many meanings about relationships, needs, control, and the value of self. The development of an eating disorder signals a problem in one or several of these areas; it arises as an attempt to solve this problem, by drawing attention to the problem, by pulling the family together to address symptoms of the eating disorder; or expressing/repressing feelings related to current problem.

— Tatum Santacasa, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Eating Disorders are the second deadliest mental heal struggle (second only to opioid addiction). They are serious and life altering. There is so much misinformation about eating disorder and this leads to many people not getting the help they need. Your struggle is valid no matter how "sick" you are and no matter what size body you have. These struggles can impact every aspect of your life and everyone should get a chance to experience freedom from eating and body oppression.

— Celeste Smith, Marriage & Family Therapist in Tyler, TX