Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

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Meet the specialists

 

For the last 3 years I have been working in a hospital setting treating children and adolescents with Eating Disorders. I received training in Family Based Treatment (FBT) and Emotion Focused Family Therapy (EFFT). Having a child with an Eating Disorder is incredibly stressful and terrifying and can create crisis in the family system. I enjoyed working with the patients and providing caregivers with the skills and tools they need to support their child through recovery.

— Jamie Gordon, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

Eating disorders and related behaviors are about far more than food. Complex feelings of fear, sadness, trauma, and so much more have manifested into something you feel you can control -- the amount of food you allow yourself to have. But do you really feel in control? What is it that is getting in the way of you feeling comfortable in your body? Your eating disorder is far more complex than just eating. Together, we will heal your heart and mind and your relationship with your body and food.

— Cristina Shea, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

Recovery is possible. I am Health At Every Size (HAES) aligned. We will identify parts of yourself that need to feel seen and acknowledged.

— Morgan Clark, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Springfield, OR

In working with me, you can expect authentic empathy and compassion for your experience, as well as a no BS approach to challenging the eating disorder. Together we will identify and target harmful behaviors, as well as investigate what might sustaining the eating disorder’s presence in your life. The goal with all of my clients is to collaboratively identify what makes life worth living, and to create roadmap to that life free from disordered eating.

— Chloe Cox, Psychotherapist in Irvine, CA
 

If you're reading this, I imagine the daily pressures of life along with the need to do everything right and be "perfect" became too much. Food becomes something to comfort, numb, or restrain from. Soon all you are able to do is think about, plan around, and focus on is food and body image. Sound familiar? This doesn’t have to be your life. Through therapy, you can learn to let go of food ruling your life and learn to have more self-compassion and acceptance for yourself. ​

— Devan Briggs, Licensed Professional Counselor in Glendale, AZ

Once you made the choice to begin living your life again and not use your eating or lack thereof to deal with your given problems, I can show you how to do that. I can also show you how to reconnect with the different parts of you to create a more harmonious balance between what happens in life and your reactions to it. I can help you connect to your body in a way that helps you feel more centered and grounded and less chaotic and anxious. You will get your life back

— Yoni Banayan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Las Vegas, NV
 

Many clients I have worked with who have substance use disorder ofter experienced an eating disorder as well. I have worked with many clients to heal their relationship with food and their own bodies.

— Ashley McInerney, Clinical Social Worker in Bloomfield, CT

Once you made the choice to begin living your life again and not use your eating or lack thereof to deal with your given problems, I can show you how to do that. I can also show you how to reconnect with the different parts of you to create a more harmonious balance between what happens in life and your reactions to it. I can help you connect to your body in a way that helps you feel more centered and grounded and less chaotic and anxious. You will get your life back and quickly too!

— Yehonatan Banayan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

I have over 3yrs experience working with body image issues, eating disorders and lessened self-confidence. I have worked in all levels of care on these issues.

— Ariel Harris, Clinical Social Worker in Raleigh, NC
 

This can include anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, emotional eating. There is a wide spectrum when dealing with eating disorders.

— Léah Ferreira, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Crescent City, CA

Moving through life with an eating disorder is not an easy journey; it's difficult to be fully engaged in life when you're surrounded by food. It can feel as though your body is in a constant battle with your mind: do I avoid the food to avoid the fear or do I fuel my body? Is there something wrong with me if I fuel my body? Our society equates a white-centric, colonized body as a valuable body, and a valuable body as a valuable and worthy person.

— Anastasia Scangas, Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

I have worked in the eating disorder field for over a decade, and have trained and supervised others in the field. I utilize evidenced-based practices including Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Family Based Therapy for adolescents.

— Brandi Stalzer, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

I shifted from work in Clinical Nutrition in the acute care setting to Psychotherapy when I knew I wanted to treat Eating Disorders. The miracle of recovery that I experienced in a relatively short time, inspired me to learn how that came to be. Anorexia, Bulimia, and Compulsive Overeating are issuer related to Anxiety, Depression, and Trauma; they result in medical issues related to nutrition- so this expertise is essential as well.

— christine loeb, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA
 

I work closely with clients with eating disorders, disordered eating and body image concerns to assist them in developing healthy behaviors around food and a more positive body image. I utilize cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) help clients develop an understanding of how their thoughts, feelings and behaviors are connected, and to provide practical skills to utilize when struggling with difficult emotions and behaviors.

— Brittany Hopkins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA

Once you made the choice to begin living your life again and not use your eating or lack thereof to deal with your given problems, I can show you how to do that. I can also show you how to reconnect with the different parts of you to create a more harmonious balance between what happens in life and your reactions to it. I can help you connect to your body in a way that helps you feel more centered and grounded and less chaotic and anxious. You will get your life back and quickly too!

— Yehonatan Banayan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Brooklyn, NY
 

I follow the Health at Every Size (HAES) model and utilize intuitive eating tools to help people reconnect with their bodies and take care of themselves in whatever way is most life giving for them.

— Cassandra Walker, Counselor in ,

I'm trained in EMDR and EMDR for eating disorders. In addition I am receiving my intuitive eating certification. My passion is helping women and teens with disordered eating and eating disorders find food freedom.

— Alicia Roeder, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Council Bluffs, IA
 

Treating eating disorders is my passion. I am honored to be able to help others heal. I have also been treating eating disorders for most of my career and I am also personally recovered. I believe my personal experience gives me both an extra level of empathy and knowledge. I currently am continuing my education is RO-DBT which is designed to treat eating and over control disorders.

— Gabrielle Morreale, Counselor in Ambler, PA

I have experience working at all levels of care with eating disorders, including inpatient work. I utilize a combination of approaches including CBT, DBT, mindfulness, and creative therapies to address difficulty around food, body image, and societal influence on diet/exercise culture.

— Kim Lycan, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Richland, WA