Feminist Therapy

Feminist therapy is a therapeutic approach grounded in feminist theory and philosophy. Central to this approach is the idea that women may experience mental health issues as a result of psychological oppression. In feminist therapy, the therapist and client are equals – the therapist's knowledge of psychology and the client's knowledge of herself come together to embrace the client's strengths. Feminist therapists seek to recognize and understand the client's socioeconomic and political situation, and are typically personally invested in ending oppression, empowering women and girls, and working toward social change. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s feminist therapy specialists today.

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Let's be honest, systems of oppression are to blame here. I love supporting my clients in healing from systemic racism, sexism, fat-phobia, ableism, and queerphobia. You may not have control over these systems, but you do have control over how you show up for yourself in this sometimes fucked up world.

— Dina Bdaiwi, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

I am able to discuss and process systems of oppression that we all live in and how to change the systems. I will not discount your lived experience and will provide a safe space for you to tell your story.

— Caley Johnson, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA
 

I want to support you in identifying societal and cultural barriers that have impacted you and learn to overcome old patterns and beliefs to step into your possibility and potential. You are the expert on your life and experiences. I am here to help you process those experiences, and actively choose what is next.

— Stephanie Kilper, Creative Art Therapist in Naperville, IL

Ask another Feminist therapist for their outline of what it is, and the answer better be different! This is a theoretical framework that allows choice, freedom, and empowerment. Principles of my feminist therapy include curiosity, respect, consent, worthiness, advocacy, and disrupting power dynamics. Emphasis on harm reduction and safety navigating the world. This framework brings sociocultural context into the room, and the ways we are impacted by our society’s pressures.

— Ginelle Krummey, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in MARSHALL, NC
 

"Feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression"--(bell hooks). Feminist therapy is used as a lens to investigate and explore how society is built for white, cis-het (cisgender/heterosexual), assigned male at birth (AMAB) people and the subsequent ramifications and consequences for others who fall out of those parameters. Intersectionality, within feminism, looks at the way differing inequalities create intersecting discrimination and inequity.

— Leta Lawhead, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA

I deeply value having an intersectional lens when exploring someone’s life & identity. There are so many systems that impact our self-perception & development. These systems are as small as our own personal family unit and grow to be as large as culture, race, religion, and socioeconomic class.

— Sara Balkanli Watkins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I work to stay open to and educated on a diverse array of approaches to gender and sexuality, I won’t shame you for the way you have sex or gaslight you about an experience that was non-consensual. It’s important to me to be LGBTQ+ Affirmative and a BIPOC Ally. I work with sex positive feminists of all genders, but my practice is focused on supporting women.

— Sydney Rose, Therapist in New York, NY

As a systems therapist, I believe that patriarchy, racism and capitalism have impacted the overall development and accessibility of healing services. I believe there is value in deconstructing the ways we have been impacted by those systems and how we can break down the barriers they create in our lives. I will help you lean into your own self-identity and free you from the pain that oppressive systems have caused you.

— Ashley MacLaren, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I utilized feminist theory in my therapy approaches

— Aydrelle Collins, Counselor in Dallas, TX

I was trained the tradition of the Stone Center at Wellesley in what was then called Feminist Therapy, but is now called "Relational Cultural Therapy". This is a strengths based approach that honors not only the specific needs of women but also takes into account the ethnic and cultural backgrounds that shape our worldview. Healing happens in relationships with others, and therapy is a way to practice this.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA
 

In my work, I focus on reworking gendered power dynamics with individuals and couples and addressing social inequities that keep partners form being collaborative with one another.

— Alana Ogilvie, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

As a practitioner, I have been trained in and have written about Feminist Therapy. Specifically, my practice is rooted in trans-inclusive feminism, which also acknowledges the cultural and societal forces that marginalize the experiences of women, transgender/nonbinary people, LGB and Queer people, People of Color/BIPOC, and other groups. Feminist Therapy acknowledges that marginalized people cannot live absent of politics, because their lived experiences have been politicized or criminalized.

— Karalyn Violeta, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

I believe societal pressures and constructs impact every individual, and therefore, every relationship. Feminist therapy and feminist family therapy acknowledge how societal expectations, gender constructs, and personal biases can influence an individual's ability to connect with others and prescribe how they do so. As a feminist therapist, I can help you understand and examine how expectations from those around us influence our sense of self and how we show up in our relationships and lives.

— Shelly Hogan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

We are all connected to one another other, and we try to live a liberated life within hidden systems of inequity. Whether you consider yourself to be privileged or marginalized, the reality is we are all a part of oppressive structures we were born into, and this effects our ability to thrive. What can we do about this? Feminist therapy recognizes systems of power, and the harm they cause, centering transparency, empowerment, and the importance of the interpersonal as paths to freedom.

— Jackie Kosak, Art Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

A feminist approach to therapy enables an egalitarian relationship between therapist and client, where the client is the expert in the room and we collaborate on treatment. My research in graduate school was on a feminist approach to working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse. As a therapist, I sought out a feminist supervisor and strive to learn as much from her as I can.

— Mark Myran, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Alamitos, CA

Feminist therapy is a set of related therapies arising from what proponents see as a disparity between the origin of most psychological theories and the majority of people seeking counseling being female. It focuses on societal, cultural, and political causes and solutions to issues faced in the counseling process.

— Monica Manuel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA
 

This framework allows us to consider the ways that a patriarchal system affects the experiences of all us, regardless of gender, and especially those socialized as women. This includes examining toxic masculinity.

— Gianna Rico, Clinical Social Worker in Baltimore, MD

We are all connected to one another other, and we strive to live a liberated life within hidden systems of inequity. Whether you consider yourself to be privileged or marginalized, the reality is we are all a part of oppressive structures we were born into, and this effects our ability to thrive. What can we do about this? Feminist therapy recognizes systems of power, and the harm they cause, centering transparency, empowerment, and the importance of the interpersonal as paths to freedom.

— Jackie Kosak, Art Therapist in Seattle, WA