Feminist Therapy

Feminist therapy is a therapeutic approach grounded in feminist theory and philosophy. Central to this approach is the idea that women may experience mental health issues as a result of psychological oppression. In feminist therapy, the therapist and client are equals – the therapist's knowledge of psychology and the client's knowledge of herself come together to embrace the client's strengths. Feminist therapists seek to recognize and understand the client's socioeconomic and political situation, and are typically personally invested in ending oppression, empowering women and girls, and working toward social change. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s feminist therapy specialists today.

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As a feminist therapist, I strive for therapy relationships that are as egalitarian as possible while still acknowledging power differences inherent in therapy. We will pay attention to your unique identity while working to understand how oppression you have experienced has affected your thoughts, feelings and ideas about yourself. Feminist therapy is for everyone -- people of any gender, race, sexual orientation, age, or religion.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Power dynamics within the therapeutic relationship as well as society at large matter. We cannot ignore the systemic and environmental contexts in which we all live. I respect and honor your expertise on yourself and your world. I am here as a guide to help you heal, not as an expert to "fix." Collaborative and empowering are my most authentic ways to work with others.

— Desiree Howell, Psychologist in St. Petersburg, FL
 

I am a cisgender queer Latinx female who has worked from a feminist multicultural perspective for over 16 years. Feminist therapy cares about intersectionality, or the idea that we all have multiple identities that impact us in different ways throughout our life. Feminist therapy is interested in collaboration that is non-hierarchical and empowering of all people, regardless of their identity status. I work hard to show up authentically as a companion on your journey.

— Geneva Reynaga-Abiko, Clinical Psychologist in Fairfax, VA

We are all connected to one another other, and we strive to live a liberated life within hidden systems of inequity. Whether you consider yourself to be privileged or marginalized, the reality is we are all a part of oppressive structures we were born into, and this effects our ability to thrive. What can we do about this? Feminist therapy recognizes systems of power, and the harm they cause, centering transparency, empowerment, and the importance of the interpersonal as paths to freedom.

— Jackie Kosak, Art Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

My therapy is always sensitive to issues of power, privilege, and oppression along many dimensions, not just gender. I approach feminism from an intersectional perspective, and am mindful of my own privileged identities as well. I take a collaborative, curious approach with all clients and recognize clients' expertise on their own lives.

— Sheila Addison, Counselor in Oakland, CA

I believe that a large part of the angst that people struggle with has to do with the rules and roles that society puts on us. Change happens through examining how you view yourself in contrast to the narrative that the dominant society has set for you. These roles are often extremely limiting, and often fundamentally traumatizing. Through an egalitarian therapeutic relationship, I work to empower clients to do the work to figure out who you truly are and what type of life you want.

— Marjorie Boggs Vazquez, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

As a systems therapist, I believe that patriarchy, racism and capitalism have impacted the overall development and accessibility of healing services. I believe there is value in deconstructing the ways we have been impacted by those systems and how we can break down the barriers they create in our lives. I will help you lean into your own self-identity and free you from the pain that oppressive systems have caused you.

— Ashley MacLaren, Counselor in Seattle, WA

Empowering women--and men--to understand their experiences to the extent that cultural influences have played a role is a focus of my practice. I explore with my clients the ways in which their lives might be changed by living more true to themselves and finding the strength to do so.

— Christa Cummins, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR
 

"Feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression"--(bell hooks). Feminist therapy is used as a lens to investigate and explore how society is built for white, cis-het (cisgender/heterosexual), assigned male at birth (AMAB) people and the subsequent ramifications and consequences for others who fall out of those parameters. Intersectionality, within feminism, looks at the way differing inequalities create intersecting discrimination and inequity.

— Leta Lawhead, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA

Modern feminist therapy is not just for women. It seeks to address the concerns of all who have been impacted by systems of oppression (Black, Indigenous, & People of Color, LGBQTIA+, those who are Neurodivergent, Disabled individuals, etc). In order to understand & help those who have been marginalized we must understand those systems & work to dismantle them. I recognize that as a white person who presents as a cisgender heteronormative female, I have unearned privilege.

— Jennifer Dolphin, Licensed Professional Counselor in Anchorage, AK
 

You are the expert of yourself; I'm here to support you with my training and skills to assist you in uncovering the answers within. I use an intersectional approach and recognize there are many factors and layers to your life, and when we can examine all aspects of our identity we move toward accepting ourselves as we are. I am committed to being an inclusive, anti-racist practitioner and do not shy away from discussing relevant social justice topics as they may arise within therapy.

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Boston, MA

I was trained the tradition of the Stone Center at Wellesley in what was then called Feminist Therapy, but is now called "Relational Cultural Therapy". This is a strengths based approach that honors not only the specific needs of women but also takes into account the ethnic and cultural backgrounds that shape our worldview. Healing happens in relationships with others, and therapy is a way to practice this.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA
 

"Feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression"--(bell hooks). Feminist therapy is used as a lens to investigate and explore how society is built for white, cis-het (cisgender/heterosexual), assigned male at birth (AMAB) people and the subsequent ramifications and consequences for others who fall out of those parameters. Intersectionality, within feminism, looks at the way differing inequalities create intersecting discrimination and inequity.

— Leta Lawhead, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA

My path as a human has been formed by feminist theorists and writers. I particularly relished discovering the "Backlash" feminism of Faludi, as well as writings by Black feminists from Audre Lord to Sonya Renee Taylor. Joanna Bird is another therapist and writer who has influenced my work as a feminist counselor: addressing issues of power both in the therapy relationship and the wider world, and working from a position of mutuality.

— Kirsti Reeve, Licensed Professional Counselor in Ferndale, MI
 

Much of my work in the last 12 years has focused on women, BIPOC and LGBTQ+people. As our society continues to change and equality issues continue to be at the forefront of the political climate, it’s extremely important to equip historically non-advantaged people with the confidence, skills, and healthy self-esteem to succeed in a challenging world.

— Elaine Dove, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Nova Mental Health Services creates a unique treatment plan for our clients but use these three treatments often. Feminists' therapy is loosely used as a way to explain how society and it being built for cis, white AMAB (assigned male at birth) people, effects us in our daily lives. We use it to question our perspectives and explore new ways of navigating life that is not as based in outdated and often harmful thinking. We do this in a way that all genders can be responsive to.

— Tayler Clark, Clinical Social Worker in Shorewood, WI
 

I practice from an intersectional feminist lens, meaning that I take into account how all the parts of your identity (race, sexual orientation, size, faith, roles you occupy, etc.) impact your individual experience of being a woman, including your experiences of oppression. I consider you the expert on you, and me the expert on psychology, and together we partner to combine our expertise in the service of your goals. I seek to empower you to make your own best decisions according to your values.

— Linda Baggett, Psychologist in Manhattan Beach, CA