Holistic Therapy

A holistic approach to therapy leads with the big picture. Holistic psychotherapy, an integrative treatment method, emphasizes the relationship between the mind, body, and spirit, attempting to understand and address the ways issues in one aspect of a person can manifest in other areas. Therapists who use a holistic approach typically believe that seeing each client as a whole being with interconnected emotions, physical feelings, thoughts and spiritual experiences is fundamental to providing successful care. Holistic therapists will help clients gain a deeper understanding of their whole self, which can build self-awareness and self-acceptance. Holistic Therapy is used to treat a number of issues, including anxiety, depression, stress, trauma and mood regulation.  Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s holistic therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Each person is a unique individual with a combination of specific skills and special challenges only they possess. I work from an theoretical framework based on holistic psychology concepts pioneered by Alfred Adler in the early 20th Century. I encourage people to live a fuller more satisfying life by coming to realize their untapped capacity to participate and contribute to their family and community in meaningful ways.

— David Johnson, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Mateo, CA

We will look at you completely and get to the root of the concern..no band aid- fixes around here.

— Alexandra Stark, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Brecksville, OH
 

I believe in a holistic approach connecting the mind, body, and spirit to find balance and calm. Using mindfulness and integrative therapeutic practices to work through the various emotions, thoughts, and feelings that may arise in a session. I focus on mind-body integration to help you stay present and grounded, with breathwork and gentle movements.

— Jennifer Batra, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Holistic therapy aims to integrate all facets of your being - mind, body, spirit - in order to achieve overall wellness. Rather than being symptom-focused, holistic therapy takes into account what makes up the whole-person.

— Dr. Dana Avey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

My focus is on the whole individual in treatment, mind, body & spirit. I teach clients how to relax their bodies and minds through yoga, meditation and mindfulness in session. I also assist clients in improving their sleep which impacts mood, energy and overall functioning. I am also available to discuss spiritual issues if clients are open to that and help guide them to see how helpful any kind of spiritual path can be a helpful part of treatment.

— Chris McDonald, Licensed Professional Counselor in Raleigh, NC

I use several different approaches in therapy but they all have one thing in common, they are holistic. This is important in order to experience growth and healing in the mind, emotions and body. Therapy approaches that only focus on part of the person, will only experience part of the healing. I believe it is important to address the entire person because our mind, emotions and body are all connected.

— Julie Holburn, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

Washington Psychological Wellness is proud to provide an integrative & holistic approach to treatment. Holistic mental health emphasizes the entire person (bio-psycho-socio-spiritual model) and not just on their symptoms or presenting problems. It reaffirms the importance of the relationship between clinician and client, is informed by scientific evidence, and uses all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals, and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing.

— Washington Psychological Wellness, Mental Health Practitioner in Gaithersburg, MD

With holistic therapy with pay attention to the interconnection of biological, psychological and social influences to our wellbeing. We will work on addressing all aspects of life that may feel like they are contributing to your wellness concerns as well as those that may not be as evident such as medical conditions, sleep problems, nutrition, and social support.

— Hope Perini, Counselor in Barre, VT
 

I find the holistic approach complimentary in working with life transitions which can be a change in the body, mind, or spirit. My education and experience in hospice and palliative care and specializing with adults and aging have lead me to assess and treat people with a biopsychosocial and spiritual model taking into consideration the entire human being and their life experiences that will guide discovery, transformation and the willingness to thrive.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO

I treat my clients as a whole person rather then a diagnosis. I see the importance of addressing all areas of a person's health and wellbeing, including their mental and emotional health but also social, physical, spiritual, and occupational health as well. All of these life areas interact and impact on another, so I find the counseling experience to be most effective when all areas are in a state of growth.

— Rebecca Haney, Counselor in Middletown, OH
 

My approach to therapy is multifaceted because You are multifaceted. My practice is integrated using "evidence based therapeutic modalities" that address Brain-Mind-Body-Emotions. We are in the new era of Western medicine and psychology. Today, instead of holding the old limiting view of the brain and body as only a biological machine, awesome scientists, doctors, and healers know mind-body is a vast energetic network where Spirit, Matter, Energy, and Power intersect -- Linking these energy centers to prevent psychological suffering and physical illness, and heal illnesses and emotional suffering. You are whole and Holistic Being. I view symptoms from a growth oriented perspective because symptoms are the alert signs telling you that something about your life, in your life, or your approach to life is not in balance. I help you on your journey to heal and transform from the “Inside-out” and the “Outside-In.” Its kinda like a Mind-Emotion-Body Detox.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

A PyschoSpiritual approach is a lovely because it holds many therapy interventions that are integral for healing! You will find hints of Feminist Therapy, Mindfulness Therapy, Trauma Therapy, and Expressive Arts Therapy. It is a sacred space and tool to explore the subconscious and the conscious, and how they work together to honor your intentions and intuitions. Specifically for me I am trained in incorporating Tarot Card pulls, ritualization, and art expression like writing and painting.

— Amy Lynch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Centenntial, CO
 

Holistic Psychology is a term that was developed to broaden the science to include looking at the whole of human behavior and to consider some “parts” that have been overlooked or deemed as outside the realm of scientific inquiry for Psychology. With Holistic therapy also, Integrative and Functional to resolve addictions, health, mental, and medical conflicts the mind, body, spiritual, and your environmental is used not just limited to theory of psychological studies and assessments.

— JESSICA DAWN RUSSELL, Therapist in Encino, CA

I use several different approaches in therapy but they all have one thing in common, they are holistic. This is important in order to experience growth and healing in the mind, emotions and body. Therapy approaches that only focus on part of the person, will only experience part of the healing. I believe it is important to address the entire person because our mind, emotions and body are all connected.

— Julie Holburn, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

Holistic Therapy addresses you as a whole person (mind, body, & spirit). I see you as more than just the reason you walk into our office. Our holistic supportive services are focused on helping individuals develop a much deeper understanding of themselves at all levels, which can often lead to improved self-esteem and self-awareness.

— Christina Rogers, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in St. Petersburg, FL

We are more than just our struggles. The relationship between all aspects of who we are: our body, mind, and spirit influence how we feel and function. By taking a holistic approach, we can consider you as a whole person and work within your emotions (thoughts and attitudes), relationships (with self and others), and spiritual aspects (beliefs about your place in the world).

— Natalie Bernstein, Clinical Psychologist in Pittsburgh, PA
 

Using spiritual belief systems and rituals as a part of therapy (fully dependent on client belief systems)

— Chris Lombardo, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,

I find the holistic approach complimentary in working with life transitions which can be a change in the body, mind, or spirit. My education and experience in hospice and palliative care and specializing with adults and aging have lead me to assess and treat people with a biopsychosocial and spiritual model taking into consideration the entire human being and their life experiences that will guide discovery, transformation and the willingness to thrive.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO