Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

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The most important factor in therapy is the relationship between the therapist and client. This is a unique relationship and with time and patience, a trust develops that helps the work go deeper. As a therapist, I hope to become your ally - someone you can trust and with whom you can feel safe to let down your defenses to work on core issues. I create an environment of non-judgment that encourages you to share your embarrassments and shame.

— Jerry Moreau, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between our inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

A humanistic orientation was embedded in all of the course work to earn my master's degree. This has always been my foundation, with any other therapy approach built on top.

— Mark Myran, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Alamitos, CA

Humanistic theories of therapy generally mirror the basic techniques of therapy taught to all social workers during their master's program. In other words I strive to be client-centered, strengths-based, solution-focused, and authentic. I try to blend pragmatism and warmth and adapt to your needs, even when that means some limited strategic self-disclosure or directive guidance when requested. But creating a safe and nourishing space is always a prerequisite to the use of other techniques.

— Samuel Wilson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Kensington, MD
 

I co-created a theory called Compassion Based Awareness Therapy. This theory is rooted in Humanistic, Attachment and Zen. The focus is in bringing awareness to your internal dynamics and how these get played out in relationships. We look through the lens of compassion because people CANNOT learn when they are being run by fear or shame. You are not your thoughts, feelings or behavior; these are clues. Collaboratively, with curiosity & compassion, we explore, uncover, unlearn & relearn.

— Laura Carr, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

An approach that prioritizes the therapeutic relationship. Providing a safe environment, were the client feels understood and accepted. As Carl Rogers said, “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” The approach includes multiple modalities which all promote looking in oneself for answers and resources.

— Shannon Kilroy, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

In congruence with CBT and Contemplative Therapy, Humanistic Therapy allows further exploration of our true self. Utilizing the strengths that we hold, emboldens the areas that are not as strong. I work to help empower individuals, couples and families, to identify their own unique view of the world and integrate that view in a productive manner.

— MICHAEL ROSE, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,

My approach to treating trauma, anxiety and chronic pain is all about you. I’ll do my best to reduce stigma and shame around your experiences when we’re working together. I’ll listen deeply, as clarifying questions to make sure our work is helpful and I’ll invite you to get comfortable: take walk, move around on a yoga ball, or get cozy under a weighted blanket.

— Sydney Rose, Therapist in New York, NY
 

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

My primary modality in therapy is Client Centered / Humanistic which highly values the relationship we will create together. My goal is to provide a therapeutic experience where I am curious, seeking a deep understanding of who you are, to meet you without any judgment, and to always see you as the expert of your own experience.

— Caitlynn Hill, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR
 

“The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination.”- Carl Rogers I am here to walk with you on this destination, to support you, provide you with navigation and tools. To be a witness, a guide and a cheerleader.

— Margaret Bell, Counselor in Denver, CO

I am a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator; this helps me support my clients around topics such as vulnerability, courage, shame, and worthiness. The work invites people to examine the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that are holding them back and identify the new choices and practices that will move them toward more authentic and wholehearted living. The primary focus is on developing shame resilience skills and developing daily practices that transform the way we live, love, parent, and lead.

— Amy Emery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MA
 

A foundation of humanistic therapy is recognizing the potential of each individual and helping them to actualize this. Everyone, at times, struggles in actualizing their potential. Roadblocks to personal growth often lead to anxiety, doubt, insecurity, and depression. Self-awareness, self-acceptance, and growth toward actualizing one's potential are important components of overcoming a variety of personal, emotional, ad relational problems.

— Louis Hoffman, Psychologist in Colorado Springs, CO

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between our inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Carl Rogers taught us to value the client, not to look down on them like idiots who do not know what is going on in their own life. Therapists should collaborate with the client with sincere respect. One of the chief cornerstones is genuineness with the client. A sincere relationship, not just a simple paid cold-hearted client.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Austin, TX

I am an expert in humanistic therapy because my experience has taught me that a therapist is never the expert on your problem or situation, you are. Humanistic therapy supports this and states that you and I together can work to come up with resources that you feel are going to be helpful for you and that you have the power to heal yourself and become whole. You are not your diagnosis- there is much more to you than that, and you are in charge of how you change.

— Sydney Koenig, Counselor in Lone Tree, CO
 

My humanistic values show through in my work with people. These values include my beliefs that each person has inherent value, dignity, and worth. These beliefs help me to be warm, empathic, and non-judgmental.

— Amber Holt, Clinical Social Worker in Gig Harbor, WA