Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

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Meet the specialists

 

I am an expert in humanistic therapy because my experience has taught me that a therapist is never the expert on your problem or situation, you are. Humanistic therapy supports this and states that you and I together can work to come up with resources that you feel are going to be helpful for you and that you have the power to heal yourself and become whole. You are not your diagnosis- there is much more to you than that, and you are in charge of how you change.

— Sydney Koenig, Counselor in Lone Tree, CO

I am a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator; this helps me support my clients around topics such as vulnerability, courage, shame, and worthiness. The work invites people to examine the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that are holding them back and identify the new choices and practices that will move them toward more authentic and wholehearted living. The primary focus is on developing shame resilience skills and developing daily practices that transform the way we live, love, parent, and lead.

— Amy Emery (not currently accepting new clients), Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , CT
 

A humanistic orientation was embedded in all of the course work to earn my master's degree. This has always been my foundation, with any other therapy approach built on top.

— Mark Myran, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

We believe the relationship between clinician and client is the groundwork that leads to effective therapy. Creating a solid connection and mutual respect allows deep work to occur in the therapy room.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

The most important factor for people achieving their goals in therapy is client-therapist match. I embrace Humanistic Therapy's tenets of empathy and honesty. The therapist is not the "expert" in the client's life, rather, the client has all the power within them to change. The job of the therapist is to act as a compassionate coach, challenging the client, and at the same time being real and authentic.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

We are all connected through our shared experience of being human. Getting to know ourselves is one of the most empowering and healing things we can do. I fully believe that being seen, heard, and witnessed nonjudgmentally by another human is one of the most healing experiences we can have.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

This approach is based on focusing on your potential and your desires to make positive changes in your life in order to find fulfillment. This is client driven in order to have a better understanding of yourself by exploring the impact of the past in the present, the now, and where you want to go in order to unleash your true self.

— Silvia Torres, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Garden City, NY

Related to my interest in Feminist Therapy, I also use Humanistic approaches in my work. By this, I mean that in our work together, we will consider all parts of you and help you to realize your full potential in life. I believe that we are each greater than the sum of our parts and that we are better people and more engaged in our lives and our communities when we have greater understanding of ourselves and others.

— Marla Cass, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Mateo, CA
 

Mostly coming from a Strengths-Based perspective, I believe everyone comes with strengths and positive qualities that they might have overlooked or could not see until therapy.

— Leslie Faulkner, Counselor

A foundation of humanistic therapy is recognizing the potential of each individual and helping them to actualize this. Everyone, at times, struggles in actualizing their potential. Roadblocks to personal growth often lead to anxiety, doubt, insecurity, and depression. Self-awareness, self-acceptance, and growth toward actualizing one's potential are important components of overcoming a variety of personal, emotional, ad relational problems.

— Louis Hoffman, Psychologist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

Humanistic therapy is all about focusing on the connecting pieces that make us human. We'll discuss the shared nature of experiences.

— Courtney Latham, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Minneapolis, MN

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between our inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

In my 20 years of therapy experience, I have learned the most important factor in therapy being successful is the relationship between the client and therapist. If the client does not feel comfortable and safe, therapy will not progress. The humanistic approach focuses on the therapeutic relationship to help create change. This approach helps people regardless of their age, race, sexual orientation, religion, etc.

— Julie Klamon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Agoura Hills, CA

A foundation of humanistic therapy is recognizing the potential of each individual and helping them to actualize this. Everyone, at times, struggles in actualizing their potential. Roadblocks to personal growth often lead to anxiety, doubt, insecurity, and depression. Self-awareness, self-acceptance, and growth toward actualizing one's potential are important components of overcoming a variety of personal, emotional, ad relational problems.

— Louis Hoffman, Psychologist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

In congruence with CBT and Contemplative Therapy, Humanistic Therapy allows further exploration of our true self. Utilizing the strengths that we hold, emboldens the areas that are not as strong. I work to help empower individuals, couples and families, to identify their own unique view of the world and integrate that view in a productive manner.

— MICHAEL ROSE, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,

Humanistic theories of therapy generally mirror the basic techniques of therapy taught to all social workers during their master's program. In other words I strive to be client-centered, strengths-based, solution-focused, and authentic. I try to blend pragmatism and warmth and adapt to your needs, even when that means some limited strategic self-disclosure or directive guidance when requested. But creating a safe and nourishing space is always a prerequisite to the use of other techniques.

— Samuel Wilson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Kensington, MD
 

I am passionate about working with my clients to enhance the quality of their lives. As a counselor, I believe we can address your self-limiting beliefs and work on building a self-concept that supports your growth. Your journey back into yourself doesn't have to be one you make alone. Let’s honor your mind, body, and spirit by practicing healing that engages your intuition and allows you to enter a new space of knowing.

— Olivia Clear, Counselor in Oakland, CA