Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

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In my therapeutic practice, Humanistic Therapy serves as a guiding philosophy, placing paramount importance on the unique experiences and innate potential of each individual. Rooted in empathy, authenticity, and the belief in personal growth, this approach creates a therapeutic alliance where clients feel genuinely seen and understood.

— Alex Kawliche, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tampa, FL

A foundation of humanistic therapy is recognizing the potential of each individual and helping them to actualize this. Everyone, at times, struggles in actualizing their potential. Roadblocks to personal growth often lead to anxiety, doubt, insecurity, and depression. Self-awareness, self-acceptance, and growth toward actualizing one's potential are important components of overcoming a variety of personal, emotional, ad relational problems.

— Louis Hoffman, Psychologist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

In my quest to deconstruct the controlling beliefs of my conservative Christian upbringing, I felt drawn to the principles of humanism. Specifically, I studied existential therapy throughout my graduate studies. I have written on the topics of humanism and therapy, and I continue to study philosophy in an attempt to better understand how to connect to diverse people in therapy.

— Lee Kinsey, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Boston, MA

Humanistic therapy is a holistic approach. Here we explore your feelings and identify your strengths to increase your self-awareness and become more accepting of who you are, you authentic self.

— Troy Hylan, Counselor in Shreveport, LA
 

Humanistic therapy emphasizes the importance of being your true self in order to lead the most fulfilling life. It’s based on the principle that everyone has their own unique way of looking at and relating to the world. This view can impact your choices and actions. Humanistic therapy also involves a core belief that people are good at heart and capable of making the right choices for themselves. If you don’t hold yourself in high regard, it’s harder to develop your full potential.

— Kim Stevens, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

My goal is to consider the whole person, especially your positive characteristics and potential for growth, not only from my professional perspective but from a your own personal sense of behavior. The emphasis in my sessions is on your positive traits and behaviors and developing your ability to use your instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within yourself.

— Jennifer Kaufman Walker, Counselor
 

A foundation of humanistic therapy is recognizing the potential of each individual and helping them to actualize this. Everyone, at times, struggles in actualizing their potential. Roadblocks to personal growth often lead to anxiety, doubt, insecurity, and depression. Self-awareness, self-acceptance, and growth toward actualizing one's potential are important components of overcoming a variety of personal, emotional, ad relational problems.

— Louis Hoffman, Psychologist in Colorado Springs, CO

Humanistic/Person-Centered Therapy is based on the belief that we each have the capacity to grow and self-actualize, when provided with a supportive environment. To create a safe and supportive therapeutic space, I listen with empathy and unconditional positive regard, believing that you are the expert on your own life. I also strive to create a space that is free of judgment, in which we both can be authentic in our expression, and where you can find answers that are true to you.

— Carla Preiss, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate
 

The most important factor for people achieving their goals in therapy is client-therapist match. I embrace Humanistic Therapy's tenets of empathy and honesty. The therapist is not the "expert" in the client's life, rather, the client has all the power within them to change. The job of the therapist is to act as a compassionate coach, challenging the client, and at the same time being real and authentic.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Humanistic Therapy, in harmony with CBT and Contemplative Therapy, amplifies our journey to self-discovery. By utilizing our strengths, it empowers growth where needed. My goal is to help individuals, couples, and families embrace their unique worldviews, aligning with Humanistic Theory's focus on personal growth and self-actualization. This integrated approach enriches lives through a holistic exploration of the self.

— MICHAEL ROSE, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,
 

I believe the rewarding process of repairing our connection with ourselves and others can only take place in relationships built with warmth, authenticity, open communication, consent, and compassion. I will work with you to create a supportive relationship that is warmly attuned to your moment-to-moment experience, and reflects your innate goodness and dignity. I hold the view that all human behaviors and emotions are attempts to care for ourselves and others, even the ones which challenge us.

— Jack Dickey, Counselor in Denver, CO

Through a humanistic lens, my sessions tend to be less-structured and focused more on supporting and understanding you without any judgment.

— Kimberly Jaso, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

My Master's Degree is from a psychology program that specialized in Humanistic Therapy.

— Leticia Berg, Psychotherapist in Ann Arbor, MI

Humanistic Therapy takes a whole person approach to healing and self growth; looking an individuals social, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA
 

The most important factor in therapy is the relationship between the therapist and client. This is a unique relationship and with time and patience, a trust develops that helps the work go deeper. As a therapist, I hope to become your ally - someone you can trust and with whom you can feel safe to let down your defenses to work on core issues. I create an environment of non-judgment that encourages you to share your embarrassments and shame.

— Jerry Moreau, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

You're human! I'm human! That's where we're all starting from, meaning that we're therapist and client second. So I know I'm going to mess up from time to time; I invite you to take a chance and mess up sometimes too. Let's own what happens and get into the muck together. In the meantime, I really believe in your strengths (and will highlight them A LOT), and will work SIDE-BY-SIDE with you to figure out what you need and how to get it.

— Brian Jones, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I believe the client is the expert on themself, and I am here to support them in their own process. I can provide resources along the way, but I don't have the "answers"--you have them within yourself already.

— Georgie Kelly, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in SAN DIEGO, CA

I will always remain firm in my belief that my clients are the experts in their lives and have the potential to reach their goals. I work from a perspective that fuels empowerment and radical self love.

— Dr. Elyssa Helfer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Humanistic therapy focuses on the here and now. The humanistic therapist provides a space of warmth, empathy, and acceptance to meet the client where they are at. In humanistic therapy, there is no power dynamic and we are both equals exploring these issues collaboratively. We may explore different issues in life including freedom, death, isolation, and meaninglessness.

— Joshua Bogart, Professional Counselor Associate in Beaverton, OR

I see therapy as a partnership between the client and the counselor. I believe you are the expert on yourself, and I provide an empathetic, non-judgmental environment, as well as an eclectic variety of philosophies and tactics for you to explore to determine what is best for you.

— Krista Cain, Licensed Mental Health Counselor