Integrative Therapy

Integrative therapy is the integration of elements from different schools of psychotherapy in the treatment of a client. An integrative therapist will first assess their client and then match proven treatment techniques to their unique situation. As it is a highly individualized approach, integrative therapy can be used to treat any number of issues, including depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Research has shown that tailoring therapy to the individual client can enhance treatment effectiveness. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s integrative therapy specialists today.

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I incorporate a variety of therapeutic approaches and techniques to address the unique needs of my clients. Integrative therapy involves combining different therapeutic modalities to create a comprehensive and personalized treatment plan. I have a commitment to working collaboratively with clients, and I am flexible and transparent throughout our work together.

— Allison Glorioso, Mental Health Counselor in Fort Myers, FL

Integrative therapy is a combined approach to psychotherapy that brings together different therapeutic methods and theories, tailoring them to meet the unique needs of each individual client. By integrating various techniques, we aim to provide a more comprehensive and flexible treatment. We may incorporate elements from humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and other therapeutic approaches, to address clients' emotional, cognitive, and behavioral concerns holistically.

— San Francisco Counseling Collective, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Therapy is based on each individual client and their specific needs. Having an understanding and being able to use multiple forms of therapy in different ways in important when being able to adjust for each individual client.

— Alison Maples, Counselor in Troy, MI

Irivn Yalom, one of the most influential therapists of the past 50-years, advocating that a new therapy is created with each therapy client. No one therapy is right for every client. My integrative approach is rooted in existential-humanistic therapy; however, I draw from various other depth psychologies and solution-focused therapies to adjust my therapy approach to the particular needs of each client.

— Louis Hoffman, Psychologist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

Being an Integrative Therapist means that I get to pull out all kinds of tools from the therapy toolbox. I often use techniques from EMDR, Somatic Experiencing, Sensorimotor Therapy, CBT, DBT, Motivational Interviewing, Solutions-Focused Therapy, Strengths-Focused Therapy, Narrative Therapy, and others. What works best for you will depend on your specific history, personality, preferences, curiosity, goals, and boundaries. But Integrative Therapy means we get to explore the whole toolbox!

— Breanne Hull, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX

I most often work from an integrative perspective, which means I use techniques from psychodynamic, interpersonal, and cognitive behavioral theories. I use the techniques that are most appropriate for my individual client's situation, and the ones that appeal to them the most.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA
 

A holistic approach to therapy that combines ideas and techniques from different therapeutic schools of thought depending on the unique needs of a given client. I integrate somatic/mind-body techniques, attachment work, and trauma-based interventions. I also integrate interventions to address high sensitivity and neurodivergence.

— Christina Cunningham, Psychotherapist in Colorado Springs, CO

Each client has unique needs and responds to different styles. I use an integrated, trauma-informed, person-centered approach to get to know you including your counseling goals, values, strengths, learning styles, and needs as a client. I then tie in modalities such as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART - somatic, eye movements), Motivational Interviewing (MI), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and more.

— Johanna Karasik, Licensed Professional Counselor in Northglenn, CO
 

Integrative therapy is an approach to treatment that involves selecting the techniques from different therapeutic orientations best suited to a client’s particular problem. By tailoring the therapy to the individual, integrative therapists hope to produce the most significant effects.

— Whitney Russell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of professional development, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, IFS, psychodynamic, and group therapy. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in SCT and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for healing and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

Treatment can often aim to see what can be learned and introduced from various perspectives in practice, with this being common with most clients.

— Scott Tomey, Psychotherapist in Farmington, MI

I incorporate a variety of therapeutic approaches and techniques to address the unique needs of my clients. Integrative therapy involves combining different therapeutic modalities to create a comprehensive and personalized treatment plan. I have a commitment to working collaboratively with clients, and I strive to be genuine and transparent, modeling authenticity as a way to create a trusting and collaborative environment.

— Allison Glorioso, Mental Health Counselor in Fort Myers, FL
 

I use a variety of theoretical orientations and treatment modalities in my work with clients. Each person and situation is unique, and I believe that an integrative approach is most effective in working with a diverse group of humans.

— JP Gaylor, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA

At Washington Psychological Wellness, we practice an integrative and holistic approach to healing, considering our clients’ mental, physical, and emotional health and interpersonal and spiritual well-being. We consider each individual as unique and therefore cater treatment to the client. Drawing from various modalities and practices, we can match you with a therapist who will understand your specific issues and tailor your therapy plans according to your needs.

— Washington Psychological Wellness, Mental Health Practitioner in Gaithersburg, MD