Integrative Therapy

Integrative therapy is the integration of elements from different schools of psychotherapy in the treatment of a client. An integrative therapist will first assess their client and then match proven treatment techniques to their unique situation. As it is a highly individualized approach, integrative therapy can be used to treat any number of issues, including depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Research has shown that tailoring therapy to the individual client can enhance treatment effectiveness. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s integrative therapy specialists today.

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Meet the specialists

 

There's no one-size-fits-all approach. One thing most people get wrong is that they don't realize how unique they are. A lot of the work I do is collaboratively painting a clearer picture of who you are, what you've been through, and forging the strength (in a nurturing environment) to wipe your lens clean from distortions that are protective yet limiting.

— Megan Herrington, Psychotherapist in Skokie, IL

The approach I take with each client is unique to that client's needs. My approach is integrative, which means that, in addition to talk therapy, I incorporate education, mindfulness, movement, breathing exercises, art therapy, sexual health information, and EMDR in my sessions where appropriate. This style reflects my authentic personality, and my love of variety and creativity, and I have found over the years that it serves my clients extremely well.

— Brandie Sellers, Licensed Professional Counselor in McKinney, TX
 

Each client has unique needs and responds to different styles. I use an integrated, trauma-informed, person-centered approach foremost. I get to know you as an individual, including your counseling goals, values, strengths, learning styles, and needs as a client. I then tie in modalities such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI), psychodynamics, and systemic lenses and techniques to help you.

— Johanna Karasik, Licensed Professional Counselor in Northglenn, CO

My eclectic approach draws from evidence-based theories and yogic philosophy. I've been a practitioner of yoga for over two decades and have been a certified 200-hour teacher since 2018. I've found through understanding and applying the Yamas, or ethical principles of yoga, we can learn to live a more peaceful and healthier life. For example, "Ahimsa," non-harming, invites us to take a non-judgmental stance toward ourselves and others so we can focus more on the important things.

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Boston, MA
 

Every person has their own unique experiences, the way in which they interact with others, and perspective on life. Therefore, therapy should reflect the uniqueness of the individual/couple/family and be tailored to their needs. Integrative therapy provides the client access to a variety of different models and methods that best suits the context of issues presented to the therapist. The effectiveness of therapy relies on the collaboration between the client and their therapist.

— Carisa Marinucci, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Las Vegas, NV

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of graduate and post-graduate education, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, and IFS. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in systems-oriented (SCT) therapy and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for human challenges and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

My practice is integrative in nature, allowing me to provide clients with treatment that is responsive to their needs and feedback throughout the therapeutic journey.

— Lyrra Isanberg, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Evanston, IL

The approach I take with each client is unique to that client's needs. My approach is integrative, which means that, in addition to talk therapy, I incorporate education, mindfulness, movement, breathing exercises, art therapy, sexual health information, and EMDR in my sessions where appropriate. This style reflects my authentic personality, and my love of variety and creativity, and I have found over the years that it serves my clients extremely well.

— Brandie Sellers, Licensed Professional Counselor in McKinney, TX
 

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy, relying on empirically-supported principles to include Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Humanistic Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy in achieving desired therapeutic outcomes. No one person is ever the same; thus, it is of utmost importance for myself and the client to work collaboratively and tirelessly to find the best treatment for them.

— Brittany Bate, Psychologist in , NC

My approach is integrative and dynamic in that I tailor the way I work with each client to meet you exactly where you are at and what you need. There is no cookie cutter or one-size-fits all approach to therapy, and each person is different. I draw from elements of psychodynamic, attachment based, mindfulness and contemplative oriented traditions, somatic therapy and parts work (IFS). Therapy with me is insight oriented, actionable, and experiential.

— Heather Stevenson, Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY
 

Why do you need Integrative therapy? because our mind heals when it communicates with a healthier body. When you are happy, functioning with less anxiety, depression or conflict's your overall wellbeing heals and works together. There is less need for medication, we experience less mind and body disorders and disease, and you will have a more successful and well functioning life. This is the life cycle and the mind/body connection that leads to a healthier you mentally and in health.

— JESSICA DAWN RUSSELL, Therapist in Encino, CA

I tailor therapy to each individual client combining different therapeutic tools and approaches to fit their specific needs.

— Kori Meyers, Counselor in Nashville, TN
 

By using integrative, it describes my approach that is largely grounded in interpersonal theory (see description below), feminism & social justice/liberation, a trauma-informed and self-compassion lens, and seeing therapy as a collaborative process.

— addyson Psy.D., Psychologist in Providence, RI

I specialize in Mentalization Based Therapy (MBT), an integrative form of psychotherapy that uses aspects of psychodynamic theory, CBT and other schools of thought, as related to psychology. Mentalization is the ability to interpret and understand the mental state of oneself or others underlying overt behavior. Goals of MBT include helping people increase mentalization capacity, which improves emotional regulation and strengthens interpersonal relationships.

— Payam Kharazi, Psychologist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

I use a mind-body approach to healing, having been trained in energy healing.

— Maureen Fiorelli, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in New York, NY

I practice integrative therapy and my therapeutic approach varies depending on a client's needs and experiences. I draw heavily from somatic therapy, motivational interviewing, narrative therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, attachment theory, internal family systems, and acceptance and commitment therapy.

— Cathy Harrington, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Everett, WA
 

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of professional development, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, IFS, psychodynamic, and group therapy. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in SCT and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for healing and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY