Intellectual Disability

Intellectual disability is defined by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. A child diagnosed with an intellectual disability can learn new skills, but they typically learn them more slowly. There are varying degrees of intellectual disability, from mild to profound. While there are many interventions for those with an intellectual disability, mostly focused on educations and life skills, mental health is sometimes overlooked. Research shows individuals who have an intellectual disability have a higher risk of mental health concerns, including depression and suicidal ideation. If you, a child in your care, or a family member has been diagnosed with an intellectual disability and is experiencing mental health issues, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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The majority of my internship hours were completed by providing Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA), through Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) to families and caregivers of those with special needs. I trained family members and caregivers on how to best provide support to shape challenging behaviors of their loved one with special needs. I worked with children and adults on the Autism spectrum, as well as a variety of other intellectual disabilities.

— Monique Mouchamel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Northridge,
 

I have worked with people with intellectual disabilities for 20 years. I love helping people with disabilities discover more about themselves and gain more independence.

— Michelle Stroebel, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Granite Falls, NC

I have a minor in special education and I have worked with this population in various capacities for a decade. There is a large gap between mental health services and I/DD services that I hope to bridge. I’ve seen people with I/DD who could use someone who is there purely for support and to help them to love themselves more. I’ve seen more than a few parents and caregivers who could use that same support.

— Haley Britton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Asheville, NC
 

There is so often a lack of resources for individuals who have intellectual disabilities are seeking an informed therapist who understand their unique needs. I have over 14 years of experience working with individuals who have disabilities. In therapy, interventions are adapted to the individual needs of the person and their support systems.

— Amber Priestley, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Woodbury, MN

I am neurodivergent and have worked clinically with neurodiverse communities for five years. My specialization field placement was with the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities where I was a Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Other Related Disabilities (LEND) Trainee. My clinical training is exclusively with neurodivergent people across the lifespan and their families through education, individual/group/family/couples therapy, advocacy, and case management.

— Bailey Woodruff, Psychotherapist in Cary, NC
 

I have extensive experience working with both youth and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. I have enjoyed working with this population professionally, both during my counseling career and prior to. I have worked in group homes, as a caregiver and case manager, in homeless shelters, and in a clinical community mental health setting with individuals in this population.

— Felicia Keeton-Howard, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA