Intellectual Disability

Intellectual disability is defined by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. A child diagnosed with an intellectual disability can learn new skills, but they typically learn them more slowly. There are varying degrees of intellectual disability, from mild to profound. While there are many interventions for those with an intellectual disability, mostly focused on educations and life skills, mental health is sometimes overlooked. Research shows individuals who have an intellectual disability have a higher risk of mental health concerns, including depression and suicidal ideation. If you, a child in your care, or a family member has been diagnosed with an intellectual disability and is experiencing mental health issues, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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Sam believes in adaptive approaches to evidence based practices. Many times people with intellectual disabilities are limited to behaviorist-driven approaches. I believe person centered, client directed approaches are central to work with clients who have cognitive impairments.

— Sam Rothrock, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

I've spent the last seven years specializing in working with, understandings, and enacting policy with this populaitons. I've also trained thousands on how to best work with this populaiton. All while still seeing people individually.

— Kayena Pierre-Louis, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

I have experience in working with ID/DD individuals and ASD. I work with individuals and teams to modify traditional treatment interventions/approaches to best serve the individual to manage presenting symptoms that disrupt daily functioning. Clients are treated with integrity and the importance of valuing all abilities.

— Alyssa Avila, Licensed Professional Counselor in New Haven, CT
 

I have extensive experience working with both youth and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. I have enjoyed working with this population professionally, both during my counseling career and prior to. I have worked in group homes, as a caregiver and case manager, in homeless shelters, and in a clinical community mental health setting with individuals in this population.

— Felicia Keeton-Howard, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA

I have worked with people with intellectual disabilities for 20 years. I love helping people with disabilities discover more about themselves and gain more independence.

— Michelle Stroebel, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Granite Falls, NC