Kink / Sexual Outsiders

In human sexuality, kinkiness is the use of unconventional sexual practices, concepts or fantasies. Kink plays a positive, healthy role in many people’s sex lives. However, integrating the nuances of kink, fetishes, and power-exchange into a loving, intimate relationship can be a challenge for some couples. Or maybe you want to work on something completely unrelated to your kink? A therapist who is sex-positive and kink-friendly can help you with both in a safe, welcoming and educated environment. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s kink experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Have you recently discovered that you have some kink fantasies that you want to explore with your partner(s) but are unsure how to bring it up? I pride myself on giving a space for you an your partner(s) to allow expression of relationship issues & exploration while feeling heard by a neutral party (myself) that affirmatively supports issues in this community while also noting that identifying as being part of this community may not have anything to do with your relationship issues.

— Paige Bond, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Winter Park, FL

I have both personal and professional experience with the kink community and I really love working with people within the kink and BDSM world. My particular specialties within this community are focused on D/s relationship dynamics.

— Misty Gibson, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tacoma, WA
 

Experiencing training specific to understanding this particular sub culture and developing kink knowledgeable competency.

— Katelyn Shields, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sacramento, CA

I am familiar and open to those people that participate in the Kink community.

— Bonnie Wright-Robinson, Counselor
 

I am an AASECT Certified Sex Therapist and working with the kink and poly communities is one of my passions. I am a kink-knowledgeable and affirming provider.

— Jodi Williams, Sex Therapist in New Haven, CT

Sex is still so taboo in America. This makes it particularly challenging for folx who engage in kink, D/s relationships, or work in the sex industry. Do you talk to your family about it? Your docotr? Your kids? It's a lot to navigate. I for one have paid for too many therapy sessions where I was educating my therapist. You deserve knowledgeable, capable support. Surround yourself with professionals who can see you, celebrate you, and support you where you are for all of who you are.

— Lou Sanfillipo, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Hyattsville, MD
 

For the past 20 years, I have worked with erotic and sexual minority clients. Most often they see their kink as a resource, not the problem requiring therapy. Yet it’s still a road of self-discovery that can have its rites of passage. They may be discovering their kink identity, or are experienced kink practitioners or educators. The journeys often heal – and become a part of adult personal development. We know from research that they may also need the skill of an experienced diagnostician

— Robert Odell, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA

In human sexuality, kinkiness is the use of unconventional sexual practices, concepts or fantasies. Kink plays a positive, healthy role in many people’s sex lives. However, integrating the nuances of kink, fetishes, and power-exchange into a loving, intimate relationship can be a challenge for some couples. Or maybe you want to work on something completely unrelated to your kink? A therapist who is sex-positive and kink-friendly can help you with both in a safe, welcoming and educated environmen

— Jerry Moreau, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

Sex is still so taboo in America. This makes it particularly challenging for folx who engage in kink, D/s relationships, or work in the sex industry. Do you talk to your family about it? Your doctors? Your kids? It's a lot to navigate. I for one have paid for too many therapy sessions where I was educating my therapist. You deserve knowledgeable, capable support. Surround yourself with professionals who can see you, celebrate you, and support you where you are for all of who you are.

— Lou Sanfillipo, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Hyattsville, MD

As a writer, teacher, and advocate for the kink community, this is my biggest area of specialty. I understand the unique dynamics that exist while living in line with your kink identity. I have extensive knowledge and experience working with various power dynamics and kinks. You will not find me yucking your yum.

— Elyssa Helfer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I am myself a kinky person, and feel that it is important to self-disclose that to help create an environment for other kinky folks to feel comfortable. I endeavor to offer a safe space for those who wish to explore and process their full selves, whether that includes the exploration and processing of kinks and fetishes, or just recognizing that these are a part of your life.

— Dorian Stein, Sex Therapist

Leather, BDSM, ENM, Dom/Sub, Master/slave, SIR/boy (or boi), Daddy/son (boy or boi), Handler/pet dynamics.

— Cub Larkin, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Wilton Manors, FL
 

Are you facinated by the idea of kink/BDSM and don't know how and where to start? Together we will navigate what turns you on & where to begin. Embarrassement and shame has no place here. Instead you will feel empowered, sexy and adventerous. You will learn to say what you want and more importantly what you don't want. Together we will figure out what to do if you want something and your partner wants something else. Talking about your fantasy can be as sexy and fulfilling as playing them out.

— Gwen Lotery, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

Every person deserves and meaningful, fulfilling sexual experience that brings them to life, gives them a sense of vitality and connection. We all find different paths to these enriching experiences. I work to empower people to find the ways they prefer and to get the most out of them. Much of this work involves overcoming shame and defeating oppression (internal and external) and bolstering empowerment.

— Matthew LeBauer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Denver, CO
 

I received my Kink Informed Certification (KIC) from the Sexual Health Alliance. I was trained by SHA educators, Midori and other experts in the field of kink and sexuality. I use a strength-based approach to working with clients involved in the kink, BDSM, leather, and other communities. My practice is non-judgmental, sex-positive and celebrates the diversity and variance in sexual expression. 

— Danielle Greenspan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sacramento, CA

Having explored several different kinks personally and professionally, I have experience inside the kink world. While I may not personally have preferences for certain kinks (your kink is not my kink), I respect and appreciate what others' may enjoy. The kink world is a highly charged emotional world, one in which a therapist needs to be sensitive.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Austin, TX
 

I work will all types of sexual behaviors, relationship configurations and non heteronormative expressions. I create a safe, contained space to emotionally and mentally explore your challenges, hopes, and ways to establish a full and healthy sex life and relationship with both yourself and those who you are connected with.

— Adrian Scharfetter, Sex Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA

Part of my initial training included working with people who self-identify as "sexual outsiders," and this is something that has applied to many of my clients. I am a member of Bay Area Open Minds, an organization for psychotherapists who affirm that sexual and gender diversity are natural expressions of the human experience. I attend panels and presentations as well as kink events.

— Cole Rennix, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Redding, CA