LGBTQ Issues

Just like any other group, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) community faces mental health issues and unique challenges. However, LGBTQ individuals are almost 3 times more likely than others to experience a mental health condition, such as depression or anxiety. Additionally, more than half of individuals who identify as transgender experience depression or anxiety. The LGBTQ community is also at a higher risk for suicide. Young people are even more at risk, as they may experience a lack of support at home and fear, hatred or prejudice in school. If you are a member of the LGBTQ community and are facing mental health challenges, you don’t have to suffer in silence. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s LGBTQ experts and get help today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Lived experience in LGBTQ community. Graduate-level coursework/projects regarding LGBTQ community. Graduate internship and supervised clinical experience working with LGBTQ children and youth.

— Sophia DeVito, Social Worker

Through out my career, I have worked with members across the spectrum of the LGBTQ community. I currently work for Fenway Health, a leader in LGBTQ healthcare where I regularly write letters for gender affirmation surgeries for my trans* identified clients. I also have worked extensively with LGBTQ identified clients in helping them over come gender and sexuality related issues, such as gender dysporia and depression/anxiety from societal views of the community.

— Will Dempsey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boston, MA
 

We work with people in their exploration of orientations and identities: sexuality, relationship (yes, it can be an orientation!), gender, and more. A joy of our practice is helping people navigate their Queer-ness. Sexuality is fluid. You are the expert of your sexual identity!

— PNW Sex Therapy Collective: Sex, Intimacy, and Relationship Therapists, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA

As part of the LGBTQ community our issues are near and dear to my heart! I love working with "family." Minority stress is real! Many of us have suffered trauma of one kind or another. I believe the "work" that we do to figure out who we are (and how to survive an environment that is often hostile) contributes to our resilience. My internship was at Affirmations LGBT Community Center, where I learned a great deal about the issues we face as a community and how to overcome them,

— Paula Kirsch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MI
 

Everyone has the answers that they need in their hearts; in their bodies. As clinicians, our job is to ask questions, express observations, and be a witness to the unfolding of answers that existed long before you meet us. As QTPOC therapist, I am here to support you in asking your questions and standing in your truth without judgement or shame. Your healing is more important than any bias or any fragility that you may encounter from a provider who can’t look past their own limitations.

— Julius Peterson, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

For a year and a half I was a staff therapist at The Spahr Center, serving Marin's LGBTQ and HIV+ populations. I hold an LGBTQ identity and value my community tremendously.

— Laurel Roberts-Meese, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in SAN FRANCISCO, CA
 

Homophobia-related trauma can leave you feeling shame, isolated and unsafe even in spaces thought to be welcoming for the LGBTQ community. Seeking help can be a series of frustrations trying to establish a connection not knowing if it is safe to open up about experiences with anti-LGBTQ violence or abuse. As a queer therapist, I want to understand your story and walk beside you as you take the bold steps to heal in an affirming space.

— Eric Goodwin, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR

All across the country,

— Roman Haas, Counselor in , CO
 

I have long worked with teens with issues relating to self identity and discovery. My work was in assisting teens discover who they are in a safe, nonjudgmental environment. My approach was also to respect the lead of my client when determining if they wished to share their identity with their family. My goal was to establish support in learning more about who they were and creating a supportive community.

— Alena Garcia, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ

Even though we have made some progress with cultural acceptance of diverse sexual and romantic orientations and gender identifications, discrimination, oppression, and marginalization of LGBTQ+ people continue. I am qualified and familiar with the challenges this communinty faces and I believe that's imperative for successful therapy outcomes.

— Roman Haas, Counselor in , CO
 

Individuals who identify as LGBTQIA+ need a counselor who is understanding and an advocate in the community. I have worked with individuals who are not only looking for a safe place to talk about sexual identity and discrimination but who also want to discuss feelings of depression and anxiety. Let's work together to help you understand how you can feel safe and proud of who you are. Contact me to see if we would be a good fit for counseling.

— Cheryl Perry, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Charlotte, NC

As a member of the LGBTQ community I am aware of the issues around coming out, dealing with family members, reconciling spirituality with sexuality, and the ongoing challenges of living with intersectional marginalized identities.

— Kirsti Reeve, Licensed Professional Counselor in Ferndale, MI
 

I came out queer in 1995 at age 17. I have been an active member of LGBTQ+ communities in several states and many local areas since then. My immediate family currently includes a transman, transwomen, and nonbinary people in addition to gay, lesbian, and bi/pansexual people. I am happy to support LGBTQ+ clients through various challenges, including: navigating family of origin, creating or expanding chosen family, building or rebuilding support systems, work-life balance, isolation, etc.

— Caera Gramore, Mental Health Practitioner in Arlington, WA

As part of the LGBTQ community our issues are near and dear to my heart! I love working with "family." Minority stress is real! Many of us have suffered trauma of one kind or another. I believe the "work" that we do to figure out who we are (and how to survive an environment that is often hostile) contributes to our resilience.I interned at Affirmations LGBT Community Center, where I learned a great deal about the issues we face as a community and how to overcome them.

— Paula Kirsch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MI
 

I have been apart of the LGBTQ community since I was 16 and has been familiar with the challenges that face this community. It could also be a number of different issues, from learning how to navigate the different social norms of being in the community to learning how to live stealth as a trans person. Since I was able to be apart of the culture, I'm aware of the struggles and how to navigate through those struggles and challenges.

— Chase Tucker, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lakewood, CO

All across the country,

— Roman Haas, Counselor in , CO
 

Lived-experience in LGBTQ community, personal interest, self-education. Graduate level coursework on LGBTQ specific issues. Supervised graduate field placement and supervised clinical experience working with LGBTQ children and youth.

— Sophia DeVito, Social Worker

Even though we have made some progress with cultural acceptance of diverse sexual and romantic orientations and gender identifications, discrimination, oppression, and marginalization of LGBTQ+ people continue. I am qualified and familiar with the challenges this communinty faces and I believe that's imperative for successful therapy outcomes.

— Roman Haas, Counselor in , CO