Men's Issues

Studies have shown that women are much more likely than men to seek therapy. However, just like women, men can benefit from having a confidential, private space to explore any issues that might be coming up for them. The term “men’s issues” can refer to any number of concerns men might face, including anger management, addiction, intimacy issues, domestic violence, mid-life crises, grief or loss – in addition to mental health issues like anxiety or depression. If you have found yourself experiencing any of these issues (or others), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s men’s issues specialists today.

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Body image issues in men just aren't talked about, are they? I want to help to change that. Our appearances are tied to our masculinity, which then brings up all kinds of issues about the toxic masculinity messages we were raised in. Maybe we even participated in that kind of regressive thinking when we were younger, and are trying to reconcile that with who we want to be now. While this is a binary description, I do this sort of work with all genders and sexual orientations.

— Brian Jones, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

I'm so enthusiastic about working with men because I've seen how our lives and the lives of those closest to us are transformed when we engage deeply in working on ourselves. We're so much more likely to believe we have to make it on our own, that it makes us weak to ask for help, or that seeing a counselor just isn't going to 'work'. I'm excited to help dispel these myths for you, and walk alongside as you rediscover excitement about your life.

— Mike Ensley, Counselor in Loveland, CO
 

I address men’s issues including mid-life anxiety, perfectionism, unrealistic expectations, feelings of failure, low self-worth, self-acceptance, values towards life decisions, relational issues towards spouse/partner, social skills, anger management, emotional regulation, role specification, fatherhood, meaning/purpose, and identity.

— Damon Neely, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

Living as a man in our society comes with unique limits and opportunities. We develop and strengthen parts of ourselves to survive struggle and meet expectations of masculinity. While these parts can be incredibly effective, they can also lead to frustration, relationship issues, and unhelpful coping strategies. Specializing in Men's Issues means creating a space to comfortably explore these issues, while becoming better at addressing feelings, meeting needs, and connecting with others.

— Blake Locher, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Men face many issues today that can make it hard to feel comfortable in our skin sometimes. It is possible to celebrate the strength and honor men tend to understand naturally without feeling less than or devalued for who we are. Toxic masculinity can be a dangerous trap. I believe it's important for men to embrace ourselves before we can have the deep compassion and generosity to be all we can for those we love.

— Rocky Bonsal, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Men's issues encompass a broad spectrum of emotional and psychological challenges that often go unrecognized or unaddressed. Men are indoctrinated into rigid notions of masculinity, which can stifle emotional expression leaving them disconnected from others as well as themselves. I create a safe and non-judgmental space where men can explore their feelings and vulnerabilities without fear of judgment, allowing them to reconnect more deeply with themselves and others.

— Jake Sims, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

In my therapeutic practice, I hold a space for addressing men's issues, recognizing the unique challenges and societal expectations they navigate. I am committed to dismantling stereotypes and fostering an environment where men feel heard and understood. Through open dialogue, we explore masculinity, relationships, and personal growth, dismantling barriers to emotional well-being. It's a journey that honors vulnerability, resilience, and strength.

— Alex Kawliche, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tampa, FL

Men come to see me for a wide range of reasons. Sometimes my male clients are seeking support or guidance around a transition or life event and find that they're not sure who they can trust with their innermost thoughts. Sometimes it's that they find they have reached the goals they set out to reach but don't quite feel satisfied. Other times, men come to see me when a relationship with a loved one is feeling challenging. Feeling listened to without judgment can be a

— Gemma Collins, Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA
 

Do you feel as if your voice hasn’t been heard or listened to? You know that something is wrong but can’t put your finger on it - you just know you need help. There’s a stigma surrounding men seeking help for their betterment that I want to help dispel. You need help to and I will work with you to figure out how to best solve any challenges that you face. We will work together and make sure that your voice will always be heard and listened to.

— Jacob Rincon, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Antonio, TX

Let me support you in navigating issues specific to what it means to identify as male. I can offer a fresh perspective and experience working with men from a variety of backgrounds.

— Gabriel Trees, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

Why does rest feel shameful at times? You know what it feels to be consumed with the pressure to make the right choices. You’re a busy guy, and you want to perform well at work and truly look after the people you care about. You want to slow down, and often wonder how other people do all of this. You could use some help in managing these burdensome emotions getting in your way. Together, we can stand at a safe position while we pinpoint and address what’s holding you back from your desired life.

— Gavin Cross, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in West Hollywood, CA

I work with a lot of men around masculinity, gender roles, processing shame, and managing anger.

— James Reling, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Do you feel as if your voice hasn’t been heard or listened to? You know that something is wrong but can’t put your finger on it - you just know you need help. There’s a stigma surrounding men seeking help for their betterment that I want to help dispel. You need help to and I will work with you to figure out how to best solve any challenges that you face. We will work together and make sure that your voice will always be heard and listened to.

— Jacob Rincon, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Antonio, TX

Being Man myself, I understand what men pass struggle with. Being a counselor, I work with men who struggle with emotional expression, relationship challenges, stress and anxiety, depression, grief and loss, anger management, self-esteem and body image, addiction and substance abuse, work-life balance, trauma and PTSD and Sexual Health and Intimacy.

— Marwan El Khoury, Counselor in Newton, MA
 

I work with men around issues of sexual identity, challenges with out of control sexual behaviors and sex addiction, libido and performance anxiety issues, and navigating sexual issues in relationships.

— Greg Bodin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Most men are brought up hearing expressions such as "don't cry" and "man up". These implicit messages from family, friends, and culture cause males to create protective and sometimes maladaptive coping mechanisms around their feelings. Ironically, men are taught not to express feelings in their youth and then expected to show emotional intimacy in adult relationships. I help men explore their repressed feelings and express them in a way that invites deeper connections with others.

— Kelly Edwards, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

While "men's issues" are certainly not limited to a gender, boys and men are often deprived of a space to show vulnerability and not given the tools needed to authentically communicate emotions. This suppression can create feelings of insecurity, anger, irritability, infidelity, increased substance use, and high-risk behavior.

— Jacob Mergendoller, Licensed Master of Social Work in New York, NY

Experience what it’s like to stop keeping all of your problems to yourself. Gain a new perspective on your challenges and build the skills you need to become the partner, father, family member, friend, and professional you want to be.

— Adam Sattler, Psychologist in Minneapolis, MN