Mindfulness-based Therapy

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment. Through the practice of mindfulness we can learn to be present with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems – and the more present we are, the more workable they become. It’s not about “positive thinking,” – it’s about not taking negative thoughts so seriously. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s mindfulness-based therapy experts today.

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My training in mindfulness began 15 years ago as I participated in the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) training as taught by Jon Kabat-Zinn, which lead to various contemplative and meditative practices in my personal journey. I received further training in mindfulness as I taught the practices with court ordered individuals who struggled with addiction, anger, and impulse control. Also in graduate school I researched the impact of mindfulness on anxiety in high school students.

— Marc Heuser, Counselor in Golden, CO

Mindfulness is an approach to be highly intentional in both actions and thoughts. Mastering the ability to respond to a situation vs reacting to a situation happens in a fraction of a second, but learning to slow down can have dramatic differences in how we feel during and after an overwhelming or uncomfortable situation. I have taken multiple trainings on mindfulness based approaches and I will utilize them in my work with you.

— Colin Bergeson, Clinical Social Worker in Franklin Park, NJ
 

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment with with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems.

— Colby Schneider, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR

I like to use various meditative techniques, breathwork, and observation into our sessions. This can help you achieve grounding or clarity in the moment and lead to new insights during your therapy appointment.

— Gianna Rico, Clinical Social Worker in Baltimore, MD
 

Mindfulness Self Compassion Coaching This path explores a deeper aspect of yourself, The mindfulness approach has a large psychoeducational aspect along with weekly meditation assignments related to your goals. In our sessions we will discuss your mediation or mindfulness assignment, I will have teaching to share and then discuss how you can and did apply these skills to YOUR life. We still have your goals and concerns we address weekly or biweekly.

— Christina Spinler, Psychotherapist in Tulsa, OK

What we pay attention to shapes our experience. By working with my clients to notice their minds, their attention, they work with attention and mindfulness to show improvements in mental health and wellness outcomes, feel more equipped to manage stressful or anxiety-provoking events, and are able to more adaptively manage unwanted sensations between session.

— Joey Salvatore, Counselor in Bethesda, MD
 

Like any illness, mental health struggles affect both the mind and body and thus, treatment should be tailored to treat both. Mindfulness allows a more holistic approach, incorporating the body, senses and the mind to treat maladaptive responses. Mindfulness has been particularly useful for me when treating anxiety as the breathing exercises can help a client feel more relaxed and able to then engage in other interventions.

— Anthony Polanco, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

The usefulness of mindfulness practice in therapy cannot be overstated, particularly when treating anxiety and depression. Mindfulness can help an individual achieve a present-centered, single point focus that in time, can train the brain to more easily drop into a state of calm alertness. One can learn to let thoughts come and go without attaching to a kind of cyclical thinking that can contribute to anxiety and depression.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Are you an Overthinker? Mindfulness can be a great set of ideas and techniques to help calm and quiet the mind, in addition to many other issues. It is similar to CBT but with a little more specific emphasis on increasing self-awareness and being present in the moment, not in the past or the future. It has a deep relaxation element to it, which I have always tried to incorporate into so many areas of therapy and in my own life. It can also be useful for many sexual areas as well.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Austin, TX

I assess and treat people based on a biopsychcosocial and spiritual model. Mindfulness-based therapy is another tool for coping with the stress and challenges brought on with aging, death/dying, chronic health/pain issues, grief/ loss and life transitions. Mindfulness-based therapy provides useful, daily coping skills and exercises that help manage feelings of depression, anxiety or unhappiness as well as preventing future onsets of discontent.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

I like to incorporate the benefits of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction in therapy as a means to help manage a wide range of situations. Mindfulness, the state of being in the present moment and non-judgmental of your emotions/current state, can be a vital component of effectively and positively managing symptoms and developing adaptive coping mechanisms. My mindfulness approach involves Conscious Breathing, Guided Imagery and Meditation, Progressive Muscle Relaxation, and much more.

— Dakota Fidram, Associate Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA

As a yoga instructor with over 20 years experience practicing meditation and mindfulness, I value the mind-body connection and how it impacts our thought process in addition to our emotional and physical responses.

— Lauren Emes, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Mindfulness techniques are something I use on a daily basis with my clients. Mindfulness includes so many ideas and concepts, from yoga to grounding. These techniques are so helpful in staying in the here and now, which is so helpful when anxiety thoughts are trying to convince us to think about a "what if" thought in the future.

— Danielle Wayne, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID

I practice therapy by incorporating awareness, mindfulness, coping skills and exploring what works for you. I've had training in Trauma informed Yoga, Sleep issues, Substance Misuse, Attachment issues and more. I am a strong learner.

— Anita Van Dyke, Counselor
 

Self-awareness is the cornerstone for therapy and change, and it is like a muscle - you need to build it! I have found mindfulness exercises helpful in this regard in addition to its benefits in stress-reduction, being present, and approaching difficult emotions. I have a certification in mindfulness-based stress reduction through Palouse Mindfulness and completed the course Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Anxiety at Boston University School of Social Work.

— Rachel Oppenheimer, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Boston, MA