Narrative Therapy

Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives. A therapist who specializes in narrative therapy will help their client co-author a new narrative about themselves by investigating the history of those qualities. Narrative therapy is a respectful, non-judgmental, social justice approach that ultimately helps individuals to externalize their issues rather than internalize them. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s narrative therapy experts today.

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This therapy approach helps clients identify their values and use them to confront present and future problems. I believe that clients are the experts in their own lives and the problem is the problem (not the person). For example, instead of someone being “a depressed person” I see it as someone who “lives with depression”. Narrative therapy is especially empowering for BIPOC communities and LGBTQIA+ because it navigates systems steeped in racism, homophobia, white supremacy, and patriarchy.

— Samantha Schumann, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I help my clients explore the stories of their lives, the stories they are telling themselves about their lives and how these all go together to affect our mental health, our self worth and how we see ourselves and the world. Sometimes we've developed stories that are based on fears and anxieties, not on how our life actually is. Taking time to look at these stories and transform these narratives can help improve overall mental health and wellness.

— Kylee Nelson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

This therapy approach helps clients identify their values and use them to confront present and future problems. I believe that clients are the experts in their own lives and the problem is the problem (not the person). For example, instead of someone being “a depressed person” I see it as someone who “lives with depression”. Narrative therapy is especially empowering for BIPOC communities and LGBTQIA+ because it navigates systems steeped in racism, homophobia, white supremacy, and patriarchy.

— Samantha Schumann, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Narrative Therapy is a therapeutic approach that centers on people as experts in their own lives. In narrative therapy, there is an emphasis on the stories we develop and carry with us throughout our lives. We create a space between person and problem, allowing ourselves to see how issues serve us rather than harms us. The goal of narrative therapy is not to transform problems but reduce their influence.

— Meaghan Decker, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Hudson, MA
 

When working with my clients who have negative self-image or deal with traumatic pasts, use the powerful metaphor of story in the Narrative Therapy Approach. This helps clients re-story their past and acknowledge their problems as separate from themselves.

— Alexa von Oertzen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Coral Springs, FL

Your story matters and you get to decide how you want to tell it. I do work with clients to look back at their past as well as forward to the future in a way that helps them think about how they are storying their life and how they want to continue to tell that story. We are constantly telling ourselves a narrative of how and why things happen. We tell a narrative that has been influenced by multiple people in our lives. I help you examine these influences and find your own inner truth teller.

— Emily Stone, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

A basic assumption of narrative psychotherapy is that people are inherently resourceful and the experts on their own lives. We focus on client’s strengths when discussing problems, creating a context for therapy to move in a positive direction. All individuals, couples and families have the ability to overcome problems and achieve more fulfilling stories for the future.

— lauren malkasain, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

Narrative Therapy is my go-to. I believe in the power of story. In Native American culture, healing circles exist where people share stories as medicine. If we view our problems as stories rather than an extension of ourselves, it's easier to rewrite the story in a more positive light than to feel like something is wrong with us. There is healing in owning your story and sharing it. We don't erase parts of the story but view them in a more positive lens to help gain a direction moving forward.

— Christina Scott, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Portsmouth, OH
 

Narrative Theory is a hope-based approach to counseling that actively works to empower you. The goal is for you to take an active role in how you live your life and understand the challenges you face. This is accomplished by exploring you and your experiences to find and leverage strengths that you possess that are either hidden, forgotten, or haven't been discovered yet. Through Narrative theory, you take an active part in becoming the best version of yourself.

— Jacob Santhouse, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in ,

I use narrative therapy techniques to recreate and rewrite the internal story if you have of yourself in relationship to other, your community and the world.

— Kieran Mcmonagle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bainbridge Island, WA
 

As a former journalist, I enjoy helping clients take an externalized, objective view of their experiences and revising those stories into compassionate narratives with new meaning and ultimately new outcomes. In the end, we are the stories we tell ourselves.

— Mary Moore, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Austin, TX

With Narrative Therapy. I assist you creating a new narrative and story for your life. With Narrative Therapy, my space will allow you an ability to tell your story, Furthermore, we work on self talk and empowerment based language. The things we tell ourselves and others DO guide the way we view OUR story (aka our lives). This modality also allows for exploring existentialism based thinking. This means you are free and responsible to determine your own development.

— Rachael Jordan, Counselor in Puyallup, WA
 

I have a background/MA in journalism/writing & have found the practice of truly looking at the stories we tell about our lives can be deeply insightful & helpful when working towards a greater quality of life. Putting the stories our minds tell us down on paper, journaling, even writing in a stream of consciousness can be enlightening & empowering by allowing us to clearly see these stories we tell, so we can edit them, rewrite them or even throw them out as we grow.

— Lara Plutte, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

Together we identify and engage the incremental steps leading in the directions you want to go, diminishing the power of problem narratives in the process. Todays climate is very difficult and Im hoping to accompany you along your path wherever it takes us.

— Eric Katende, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Narrative therapy allows you to tell the stories of the experiences that make you who you are. These stories may be hard to tell, but in processing how you have internalized your experiences, we can determine the pieces to keep and the pieces that no longer serve you. It is all about re-claiming your story and building an identity that promotes self-acceptance and hope for the future.

— Hailey Hughes, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX

We all have stories about ourselves, our relationships, and our sexuality. Sometimes these stories keep you stuck in anxiety, shame, guilt and disconnection. Using Narrative Therapy, I help you get to know these stories you have and begin to identify what you really believe and value. Narrative Therapy also involves looking at how your family, past partners, and societal messaging may impact these stories that hold you back.

— Taylor Kravitz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

I utilize Narrative Therapy to help clients uncover negative self talk and the internal shaming inner critic. Narrative Therapy helps clients become embrace being an expert in their own life. I empower clients to reframe negative narratives into positive ones to effectively view themselves in a more positive light. Negative narratives are a large drive in low self esteem and self worth. As clients develop positive narratives instead, they gradually develop more confidence and higher self esteem.

— Cindy Hyde, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

Individual people and communities of all sizes understand their identity and purpose via the stories they tell. Narrative theory is about unpacking the stories we tell about ourselves and where they come from, societal stories, family stories, community stories. It's about actively choosing what stories we want to tell in the future. My practice of narrative therapy is informed by the work of Black feminists like The Combahee River Collective, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison.

— Renya NeoNorton, Marriage & Family Therapist
 

My graduate work and pre-license training has been on Narrative Therapy. It is the lens I use and my main modality that compliments other therapy interventions.

— Libni Lopez, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oberlin, OH