Nonviolent Communication

Nonviolent communication was developed out of a belief that our culture has taught us to think and speak in ways that can actually perpetuate conflict, internal pain and even violence. Nonviolent communication is founded on the tenet that all human beings have the capacity for compassion and only resort to violence or behavior that harms themselves and others when they do not recognize more effective strategies for meeting needs. It is typically taught, often in a therapy session, as a process of interpersonal communication designed to improve compassion for, and connection to, others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s nonviolent communication specialists today. 

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I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication (NVC) about 17 years ago and have been drawing upon the practice ever since. NVC is a way of perceiving one's self, one another and the world with empathy--truly listening with an open heart. I am inspired by NVC's stance that humans share common needs. In my work, I listen for those needs; to be understood, to have choice, or be considered, to name a few. Learning to connect with our feelings and needs creates space for healing.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in East Bay, CA

I have been working with Nonviolent Communication (NVC) for nearly 20 years. This form of communication supports skills building in emotional awareness, needs awareness, conflict resolution, and more. I am happy to offer support in learning and using NVC, or in simply hearing me offer examples of NVC to the client.

— Caera Gramore, Mental Health Practitioner in Arlington, WA
 

Compassion is key to our work together, as is developing an awareness of your worth and your values. In a relationship with others, NVC helps us recognize that we are all autonomous beings and effective, clear communication is key to getting our needs met. It removes the "good" and "bad" labels we may impose on things and instead encourages us to be curious and nonjudgmental. It's quite liberating!

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Boston, MA

NVC is the practice of making an observation, expressing a feeling, then a need and making a request. Using NVC takes the charge out of communication which can be so painful and threatening to the survival of the relationship. It allows people to take ownership of their experience and not direct their feelings towards others, which usually only escalates conflict and leads to breakdowns. Utilizing NVC makes hearing one another much easier by staying calm & cool.

— Annette Barnett, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Cruz, CA
 

NVC is the practice of making an observation, expressing a feeling, then a need and making a request. Using NVC takes the charge out of communication which can be so painful and threatening to the survival of the relationship. It allows people to take ownership of their experience and not direct their feelings towards others, which usually only escalates conflict and leads to breakdowns. Utilizing NVC makes hearing one another much easier by staying calm & cool.

— Annette Barnett, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Cruz, CA

I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication (NVC) about 17 years ago and have been drawing upon the practice ever since. NVC is a way of viewing one's self, one another and the world with empathy--truly listening with an open heart. I am inspired by NVC's stance that humans share common needs. In my work, I listen for those needs; to be understood, to have choice, or be considered, to name a few.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in East Bay, CA
 

I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication (NVC) about 17 years ago and have been drawing upon the practice ever since. NVC is a way of viewing one's self, one another and the world. At the center of NVC is empathy--truly listening with an open heart to ourselves and to those we want to connect with. I am inspired by NVC's stance that humans share common needs. In my work, I listen for those needs; to be understood, to have choice, or be considered to name a few.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in East Bay, CA

I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication (NVC) about 17 years ago and have been drawing upon the practice ever since. NVC is a way of viewing one's self, one another and the world with empathy--truly listening with an open heart. I am inspired by NVC's stance that humans share common needs. In my work, I listen for those needs; to be understood, to have choice, or be considered, to name a few.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in East Bay, CA
 

I have been using NVC since before becoming a therapist. My partner first introduced it to me back in 2016 as a helpful way to relate to children. But as Marshall Rosenberg made clear, its use can serve people of all ages from any background. This is because the emphasis is on understanding someone else's underlying needs, which we all have. In communicating with "I" statements, recognizing ones feelings and values, and requesting help, we avoid blame, evaluation, and demands that alienate us.

— Dani Knoll, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

Nonviolent communication is a strategy championed by Dr. Marshall Rosenberg, Ph.D. Through the use of nonviolent communication, you will learn to identify unmet needs within yourself and others and communicate them in a fashion that reduces blaming langue. This solution focused communication strategy allows you to communicate by focusing on the unmet need and working towards resolve rather that focusing on blame and defensiveness.

— Ngozi Nwosu, Therapist in Scottsdale, AZ

Often we struggle within our relationships due to a lack of understanding of how to communicate. Nonviolent communication gives us a good framework to learn the art of communication.

— Kimberly Perlin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Towson, MD
 

The work of Marshall Rosenbaum has been instrumental in forming my practice. The strategies outlined by this practice are useful in working with families and couples. NVC helps people own their own emotions, not those of others.

— Mark Best, Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA

NVC is foundational to the work I do with clients. I encourage my clients to communicate with themselves and with others from a place of empathy, understanding and openness/flexibility, all while asserting and holding personal boundaries.

— Nanika Coor, Clinical Psychologist in Brooklyn, NY
 

I look to create communication that decreases defensiveness. I believe NVC is one of the best ways to do this. NVC addresses the issue in a way that is non-threatening as well as offers solutions, so the problem doesn't continuously emerge.

— Jennifer Masri, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

If you have struggles communicating with your family, friends, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, boss, teacher, neighbor, etc. you will benefit from learning nonviolent communication (NVC). NVC is being used around the world to aid in communication and to decrease conflict. NVC is composed of four parts: observations, feelings, needs, requests. When you focus on your own experience, the receiver hears the message without blame or criticism (and are less likely to become defensive).

— Jillian Breuninger, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

With (NVC) we learn to hear our own deeper needs and those of others. Through its emphasis on deep listening—to ourselves as well as others—NVC helps us discover the depth of our own compassion. This language reveals the awareness that all human beings are only trying to honor universal values and needs. NVC can be seen as both a spiritual practice that helps us see our common humanity, using our power in a way that honors everyone's needs, and and a concrete set of life-serving skills.

— Amy Ruth Crevola, Licensed Clinical Social Worker