Panic

Panic is a sudden sensation of fear, typically so strong that it prevents logical thinking and may trigger a fight-or-flight reaction. If you’ve ever experienced a panic attack, you know how frightening it can be – you might think you are having a heart attack or even dying. Panic attacks usually start without warning and come on suddenly. It is not uncommon for many people to experience one or two panic attacks over the course of their lifetimes. However, if you are experiencing frequent panic attacks, you may have panic disorder. Panic disorder is an anxiety disorder that, in addition to repeated panic attacks, may also include an intense and ongoing fear of having another attack that can affect your daily life. Whether you’ve just had one experience with a panic attack or you are suffering from recurrent panic attacks and suspect you might have panic disorder, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s panic experts today.

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I utilize an exposure and response prevention model (ERP) to help my clients manage feelings of panic related to anxiety, PTSD, or OCD.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I am trained in methods to reduce the distress that a person feels surrounding panic disorder. The irony of panic is that the acceptance and welcoming of it is how one heals. I will teach you techniques to ground yourself in the moment and recognize what is going on with your body when you are experiencing a panic attack. You don't have to suffer any longer.

— Cornelia Seiffert, Clinical Social Worker

Your body is talking! And it wants you to listen. Our bodies and our brains work in tandem warning you of danger. Sometimes, our bodies perceive we are in danger even when we're not. A panic attack is a warning sign to fight, fight, or freeze! Together we will uncover undigested trauma, triggers, patterns, and nervous system regulation. Using EMDR, somatic, and embodiment practices you will start to notice what your body is trying to say and honor what it needs.

— Ivonne Melgar, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sacramento, CA
 

Your body is talking! And it wants you to listen. Our bodies and our brains work in tandem warning you of danger. Sometimes, our bodies perceive we are in danger even when we're not. A panic attack is a warning sign to fight, fight, or freeze! Together we will uncover undigested trauma, triggers, patterns, and nervous system regulation. Using EMDR, somatic, and embodiment practices you will start to notice what your body is trying to say and honor what it needs.

— Ivonne Melgar, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sacramento, CA
 

I provide Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder. This form of intervention entails both behavioral exercises (exposure) and cognitive work (addressing beliefs and thought patterns that maintain the disorder).

— Michael Greenberg, Clinical Psychologist in Beverly Hills, CA

I work with my clients to explore perceived threats that trigger anxiety, panic, and worry. We use socratic questioning and probabilities to determine likelihoods of fears and worries.

— Tonya Washington-Hendricks, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Treating panic is a central focus of my practice. I have personal experience with panic attacks, and have personally developed the coping skills necessary to prevent or navigate panic with confidence. It is so fulfilling to share these tools with a panicking client. I draw not only from personal experience and trial and error, but also from the latest research and decades of theory and practice. Panic is such a passion of mine that I am currently writing a book on the subject!

— Lizzy Ball, Therapist in Chicago, IL

When a client starts therapy to address panic, we use a structured approach to learn distress tolerance and emotional regulation skills, reframe negative thought patterns that trigger panic, to utilize exposure exercises to extinguish panic symptoms, and create a self care plan to help mitigate stressors.

— Kristen Quinones, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

A panic attack is different from anxiety. Panic attack often comes on suddenly and involve intense and often overwhelming and frightening physical symptoms. Many people describe it as a feeling of “going crazy” or losing control. Sometimes those experiencing a panic attack go to the hospital thinking they are having heart attack. Common symptoms include: Chest pain or tightness in chest Racing heartbeat Shortness of breath Dizziness or lightheadedness Numbness or tingling

— Janice Raj, Counselor in Santa Clara, CA

I have treated many clients who struggle with panic attacks. I have experience utilizing somatic experiencing, mindfulness, breath-work, and DBT when treating panic attacks. I focus on calming the Sympathetic Nervous System.

— Ali Mills, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Philadelphia, PA
 

I am here to guide you through the steps to take to recover from the devastating effects of panic attacks. I will provide you with the tools you need to help you manage these symptoms and begin to heal.

— Erika Huber, Counselor in Tucson, AZ

Experiencing panic can be a very scary experience. I can equip you with tools and knowledge to overcome your panic attacks. Feel free to reach out and chat with me more about this!

— Jenny Labrousse, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Tigard, OR
 

I help clients manage panic attacks with grounding exercises. When the client is ready, we explore the root cause of the panic disorder. Panic disorder has a biological component . It is nothing to be ashamed of, and it can not be ignored.

— Tammy Whitt, Counselor

I have had extensive experience working with those who have panic disorder and I am proficient in exposure therapies, ACT therapy and REBT (all extremely effective and useful with panic disorder). I work with clients "where they are at" and with "baby steps" together we can get you to the point where you can manage and control your panic attacks and often have long periods (even years!) of no panic attacks. You may reach these goals without the use of medication!

— Deborah Fatone, Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY