Person-Centered (Rogerian)

Person-centered therapy, also sometimes called Rogerian therapy or client-centered therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on Rogers’ belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator. The idea is that, in the process, the client will steer their own journey of self-discovery and will find their own solutions. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s person-centered therapy experts today.

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Person-Centered is my foundational theory from which I incorporate all other treatment orientations.

— Carolina Castano, Licensed Professional Counselor in Cincinnati, OH

Carl Rogers, the founder of Person Centered psychotherapy believed that the most important aspect of the therapeutic process was the relationship between the client and the therapist. I hold this belief as well and have found that the best outcomes are arrived when a person feels heard, understood and supported in their process for working on difficult problems and finding meaning. Without this, other therapy models are just tasks.

— Leah Logan, Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID
 

Person-centered therapy, also called Rogerian therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on the belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator to guide the client to find their own goals and solutions.

— Colby Schneider, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR

All my work is person-centered, where I focus in on your needs and will cater my approach to supporting you in that way. I believe that YOU can truly be the expert of your own life, where my goal is to help you recognize your true needs, and define our own individual norms and standards for a happy and successful life.

— Juliette Blank, Licensed Mental Health Counselor
 

You are the expert on you. You're not a diagnosis, and I'm not a figure of authority, or a mentor. Therapy should serve to provide a space that is nurturing, empowering, and challenging in ways that inspire personal reflection and encourage positive steps towards achieving your goals. It's my mission to craft that space along with you; it looks different for everyone, but it is uniquely your own.

— Nathan Robbel, Therapist in Chicago, IL

Person-Centered theory is all about a way of being towards you. It is grounded in the desire to show respect and care for you as a person. Carl Rogers (founder of Person-Centered theory) coined an idea known as Unconditional Positive Regard. The goal of my actions as your counselor is to show a deep value, care, and respect, for you. I want to create a space that says, “I honor you and hold no judgment for any piece of you.” A space where you can safely become the best version of yourself.

— Jacob Santhouse, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in ,
 

I believe therapy is your time to work on what you see as necessary in helping you reach your goals. I will work with you to develop a treatment plan that has achievable goals.

— Emelia Thygesen, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Wilmington, NC

This all begins (for my clients) in-session with Person-Centered (Rogerian) therapy, because arguably no other modality is better at establishing the beginning (and cultivating) what we refer to as the therapeutic alliance (relationship). Most in this field will agree that without the therapeutic rapport there is no real counseling taking place, and without it the client would basically be wasting their time on that couch.

— Dennis Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Las Vegas, NV
 

Like many therapists, I believe in holding a space for my clients that is unconditionally accepting as well as showing up in sessions with my authentic personality, beliefs, and reactions. It is this kind of authentic space that allows for genuine encounters that lead to positive change and growth.

— Kate Fallon Upton, Associate Professional Counselor in Marietta, GA

The humanistic approach is the keystone to any good therapy. I hope to be able to be there for you in a personal way that incorporates a compassion and intuition that feels right for you.

— Jose Feliciano, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in La MESA, CA
 

With kids, teens, and adults I tailor my sessions to the individual and let them lead with what they find most important. I use a variety of approaches to help support clients in the best way for each individual. Therapy with me is a safe space for clients to be accepted and be themselves. My clients describe me as calm, caring, heartwarming, and supportive. I am also empathetic and practical. I aim to be insightful, reassuring, and non-judgmental.

— Jenna Wonish-Mottin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in The Woodlands, TX

I believe the relationship is everything in therapy! Carl Rogers understood this best, and his work is a masterclass in demonstrating the magic of the therapeutic relationship.

— Elle Bernfeld, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

All my work is person-centered, where I focus in on your needs and will cater my approach to supporting you in that way. Not one size fits all, where it sometimes takes a combination of remedies and modalities to achieve your goals. I believe that YOU can truly be the expert of your own life, where my goal is to help you recognize your true needs, and define our own individual norms and standards for a happy and successful life.

— Juliette Blank, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

My master's training was completed at an institution which emphasized person-centered counseling.

— Chanel Brown, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate
 

Person-centered therapy is a collaborative approach between therapist and client. As the name sounds, it is very much focused on the individual and their goals. The belief of person-centered therapy is that everyone has the capacity to fulfill their own potential through personal growth and change. Essentially, you are the one that holds the power to make positive changes in your life and my role is to help you learn new skills and strengthen current ones to support that.

— Jessica Aron, Clinical Psychologist in WHITE PLAINS, NY

When taking a person-centered approach with clients it means I look at each client with unconditional positive regard. Empathy is key, I don't believe humans are inherently flawed, I believe each person has the potential for growth and change. Sometimes we as humans need someone to help guide, empathize and create a sense of structure to help one discover their own solutions towards transformation. Collaboration is key.

— Jessamy Whitsitt, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

As a person-centered provider I meet my clients as they are and collaborate with them to make common goals that feel obtainable and congruent. You will be met with a non-judgmental and compassionate approach with respect to your own beliefs and perspectives.

— Kassondra Wilson, Mental Health Counselor in , WA