Polyamorous and Open Relationships

Even though they both fall under the umbrella of consensual non-monogamy, polyamory and open relationships are two very different things. Polyamory means having multiple romantic relationships at the same time, with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. An open relationship is a relationship where the parties are free to take new partners. Whatever form of non-monogamy you practice or are interested in exploring, you and your partner(s) will have to navigate things like boundaries, safe sex, and jealousy. If you are running into issues or roadblocks, seeing a qualified mental health professional provides a safe and supportive space to discuss your concerns and improve communication skills. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s polyamorous and open relationships experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

As with gender identity, I have personal experience navigating polyamory. I don't have a one-size-fits-all approach, but I am comfortable with and accepting of polyamorous and open relationships, and can work with individuals, couples, and other relationship configurations to support people navigating relationships outside the box.

— Zem Chance, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Eugene, OR

Thinking about entering a polyamorous or non-monogamous relationship? Together we can work on building the communication skills to discuss with your partner(s) the ins and outs of being poly or ethically non-monogamous. With that, comes feelings of jealousy, distrust, insecurities, etc. We can work towards finding ways to be open and honest, genuine, and compassionate towards your partner(s).

— Miguel Lopez, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Worth, TX
 

While your relationship orientation may come easily to you and your partners, the world around us can really complicate things. From navigating our nuclear families to traditional institutions, it can all add additional stress to your relationships. All relationships take work. Growing and changing together with those we care most about, that is an accomplishment. Partnerships of all shapes and sizes welcome.

— Lou Sanfillipo, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Hyattsville, MD

My training as a therapist landed me with a degree in Marriage and Family therapy, which basically means I work with relationship systems. As a non monogomous therapist I quickly began applying what I was learning in school to non monogomous relationship structures to better serve communities I belong to and work with. My training to work with relationships started in grad school, Gottman level 1 and now Developmental Model (attachment and relationship stage based).

— Birch Snogles, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ann arbor, MI
 

I have been involved in the alternative lifestyles myself for several years now. I have helped numerous people understand and navigate the emotional waters of getting involved in open relationships. Conquering issues of jealousy and knowing how to, not just battle these fears, but how to use better marital communication to grow the relationship to a deeper and more fulfilling relationship than ever before, is a primary goal for me as a therapist.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Austin, TX

Clients should feel affirmed that polyamory is a valid lifestyle, and my practice is welcoming towards polyamorous people. Furthermore, I have over two decades experience understanding the diverse spectrum of the consensually non-monogamy communities.

— Erick Sowell, Clinical Social Worker in Baltimore, MD
 

Originally inspired by Dr. Ruth Westheimer, I knew I wanted to be a sex therapist someday. I just didn't know it was possible. After graduation I learned that I could specialize in sex therapy! So I did! As a graduate of U of M's Sexual Health Certificate Program, I welcome working with people in non-traditional relationships, whether they be open, poly, or "monogamish." I "get you" and honor your path! No "side eye" from me!

— Paula Kirsch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MI

Do you feel like you can’t say how you really feel? Do you love your partner, and also realize no single person could, or even should be everything? Do you watch RomComs shouting “just date both of them!” You might be poly, swinging, or you might be somewhere in the middle; how you date, copulate, and relate is valid. Whether you are trying to explore who you are, come out, or do what you do better, I am here to replace the lack of Disney movies showcasing your flavor of romance.

— Cody Glover, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I work with individuals, couples, triads, and polycules of all configurations to achieve healthy communication, reduce jealousy, negotiate boundaries, and resolve common conflicts experienced in non-traditional relationship styles. I work extensively to provide education to (and on) the polyam, ENM, CNM community and see these relationship styles as valid and healthy, not psychopathological.

— Farrah Bonnot, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denton, TX

Originally inspired by Dr. Ruth Westheimer, I knew I wanted to be a sex therapist someday. I just didn't know it was possible. After graduation, I learned that I could specialize in sex therapy! So I did! As a graduate of U of M's Sexual Health Certificate Program, and AASECT Certified Sex Therapist, I welcome working with people in non-traditional relationships, whether they be open, polyam, or "monogamish." I "get you" and honor your path!

— Paula Kirsch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MI
 

My master's program included training in polyamory and ethical non-monogamy (ENM). I have a long-term interest in subverting traditional cis-heteronormative relationship structures in my personal life and am in relationship with people who are practicing polyamory and ENM. I believe all relationships (romantic or otherwise) are sacred, we need each other.

— Kelsey Miller, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate

Whether you are an established Polyamorous couple or needing support in starting a new chapter with other partners, I think having a basic foundation of communication/honesty is important for any relationship to work. In session I hope to encourage both couples to discuss what a relationship is and define how all partners can set boundaries to enrich their lives.

— Ishmaella Brutus, Mental Health Counselor in Long Island city, NY
 

As someone who has lived experience in conscious non-monogamy I always knew that this was an issue that I wanted to support clients through. Polyamorous and Open Relationships are valid forms of relationships, but they only work when you put the work in to understand why you're drawn to it and communicate with your partners effectively. Working in relationships I utilize EFT, Gottman level 1, and Developmental Model (attachment and relationship stage based).

— Marjorie Boggs Vazquez, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I have 14 years experience working with couples of in non-traditional relationship types (i.e. open, polyamorous, consensually non-monogamous). I have advanced clinical training in Polyamory and Kink Life Styles. I believe all relationship types are valid and deserve support toward relational health and success. I am also listed in the Poly Friendly Professionals Directory.

— Lauren Wynn, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

My consent based approach is very applicable in addressing relationship based issues, and this has certainly been an important part of my work with clients in the past. In addition, this is something I have personal experience with as a Relationship Anarchist. In my experience, navigating a practice of love with multiple people taking into account attachment histories is sometimes very challenging but can also be very rewarding.

— Renya NeoNorton, Marriage & Family Therapist

I have extensive training in and personal experience with Polyamory, Open Relationships, Ethical Non-Monogamy or Consensual Non-Monogamy issues. I have provided cultural competency training to a handful of service organizations and agencies over the years. Moreover, I have developed group curriculum for addressing major issues in polyamorous configurations.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO
 

Consensual non monogamous relationships are growing every year and having a therapist who is versed and trained in this relationship structure is so valuable for people looking to enter polyamory in an informed manner, or to address issues that may arise in poly relationships. Knowing that you can come to therapy to address open relationship dynamics from a supportive, welcoming stance is the empowering experience many clients need.

— Leah Logan, Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID

I welcome consensually non-monogamous partners. Whether it's just one of you or the whole polycule, I can help you find a way to love each other better.

— Anna Khandrueva, Therapist in Broomfield, CO
 

My training as a therapist landed me with a degree in Marriage and Family therapy, which basically means I work with relationship systems. As a non monogomous therapist I quickly began applying what I was learning in school to non monogomous relationship structures to better serve communities I belong to and work with. My training to work with relationships started in grad school, Gottman level 1 and now Developmental Model (attachment and relationship stage based).

— Birch Snogles, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ann arbor, MI