Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a traumatic, scary or dangerous event. PTSD can be caused by either witnessing or experiencing the trauma. Events that sometimes trigger PTSD include everything from sexual assault, war, and violence, to car accidents or other incidents that could cause loss of life. It is not at all uncommon for people who go through something traumatic to have temporary difficulty coping and acute symptoms, but with time, they usually get better. However, if the symptoms last longer than a month, get worse rather than better and affect your ability to function, you may be suffering from PTSD. Symptoms of PTSD may include severe anxiety, anger, nightmares, trouble sleeping, flashbacks to the event, frightening thoughts, avoidance of situations or places, feeling on edge and/or being easily startled. If you think you may be experiencing PTSD, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today to get help.

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One Year Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Certificate from the Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic Studies Trauma Resiliency Model - Level 1 from the Trauma Resource Institute.

— Melissa Dellens, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

I love helping people move though their trauma and get to see what's on the other side. My approach relies heavily on Brainspotting, so I'm only working with clients at this point who are open to it as part of our work together. For more information visit brainspotting.com or my website.

— PK Ponti-Foss, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

Work with addictions & veterans required me early on to dive into the depths of understanding and treating trauma, particularly complex post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). I take a phased approach to treating trauma that respects the sensitivity of the wounds and humanely and gradually builds resiliency by learning how to find safety and regulation when false alarm survival responses take over before we eventually turn our attention to facing the “hornet’s nest” of the memories themselves.

— Mackenzie Steiner, Psychologist in Austin, TX

Do you go from 0-100 in a nano second? Your heart is beating out of your chest, it's hard to breathe, and the panic is in complete control. In the face of danger, our body is wired to react before our brain is even aware of the threat. PTSD occurs when we don't take the time for our mind to process the event. Therefore, the trauma memory can only be stored as the fight/flight reaction, and anytime your body is reminded of the original trauma, you go from 0-100 in a nano second.

— Renee Cagle, Licensed Professional Counselor in Frisco, TX
 

Find out more about how I can help you with trauma via my specialty webpage: https://windingriverpsychotherapyservices.com/emdr-trauma-therapy

— Tim Holtzman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA

Trauma experiences often continue their very real presence with us and know no timeline. Addressing this trauma in a safe space with plenty of time to slow down and work through all of the details and impacts on your life is the goal when I am with my clients. I will support you to take the lead in what you feel ready to process, and I will guide you in this healing with a strong and protective presence so you can focus on your own needs.

— Joy Walsh, Clinical Social Worker in Glen Ellyn, IL
 

According to SAMHSA, it is estimated that first responders develop depression and PTSD 33% more often than general public, firefighters have higher suicidal ideations and attempts than general public and it is estimated that 125-300 police officers commit suicide yearly (2016). In the year 2021, more police officers died from suicide than in a line of duty. You are not alone!!! Reach out and find the resources to take care of you!!!

— Nataly Kuznetsov, PMHNP-BC, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in NAPA, CA

Often times, people who have experienced trauma don't present with concerns that exactly fit with PTSD. Especially for people who have experienced chronic and persistent trauma, coming to therapy often means addressing situational and/or life stressors first, before being able to look at some of the underlying experiences of trauma that have exacerbated those stressors. And, there are those instances where one or more very specific and identifiable traumatic events have resulted in PTSD. When people see me as a result of this type of trauma, we'll initially work at ensuring there is safety both inside and outside of the therapy space, while also developing specific skills and strategies to manage the specific impact of the trauma(s) experienced.

— Jeff Levy, Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

I have completed 2 courses specifically on trauma and have had several client experiencing PTSD. These courses both taught me invaluable skills on the science behind trauma's effect on the body and brain chemistry as well as exercises to help clients regulate their symptoms.

— Tracy Sondern, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Certified in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Trauma Focused- Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

— Melody Caldwell, PsyD, Psychologist in ,
 

My field experience combined with my mental health background allows me to provide culturally competent care. I want you to feel heard by someone who understands! Whether you are interested in medications or not, I am looking forward to connecting with you and partnering with YOU to help YOU achieve satisfaction and success in life, while ultimately feeling empowered in YOUR own wellness journey.

— Nataly Kuznetsov, PMHNP-BC, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in NAPA, CA

As a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional and Certified Brainspotting practitioner, I understand the complexities around surviving abuse, neglect, and violence, and the impact of symptoms of PTSD and Complex PTSD (C-PTSD). I also have experience working with survivors of intimate partner violence and childhood abuse and neglect.

— Jacqueline Casumbal, Psychotherapist in Gaithersburg, MD
 

Trauma can occur from one major event or from ongoing traumatic experiences. In other words, we can develop symptoms of trauma from "big T" traumas or a collection of "little t" traumas. After a single traumatic event, we can employ a variety of techniques to help stabilize your daily experiences and move you toward feeling healed. When a series of traumas has occurred, we work together to create safety, structure and ongoing healing throughout all areas of life affected.

— Rebecca Doppelt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

Traumatic events are defined as physical or sexual abuse, psychological abuse (persistent intimidation, manipulation, criticism), or cumulative stress caused by repeated workplace exposures or a lifetime of systemic oppression. You may experience intrusive memories and nightmares, difficulty experiencing positive emotions, feeling detached from others, and more. You might find yourself engaging in destructive behavior to distract from your pain. Recovery is possible!

— Serena Forward-Rodriguez, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Early in my career, I provided readjustment and trauma counseling to combat veterans and their families. I then spent 5+ years working with families who experienced pervasive, acute mental health symptoms often a result of complex trauma. During those years, my team and I provided in-person mental health crisis support for clients experiencing suicidal/homicidal ideation and episodes of psychosis. I have received specialized, on-going training for the healing of complex trauma and PTSD.

— Laura Sendelbach, Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA

Often times, people who have experienced trauma don't present with concerns that exactly fit with PTSD. Especially for people who have experienced chronic and persistent trauma, coming to therapy often means addressing situational and/or life stressors first, before being able to look at some of the underlying experiences of trauma that have exacerbated those stressors. And, there are those instances where one or more very specific and identifiable traumatic events have resulted in PTSD. When people see me as a result of this type of trauma, we'll initially work at ensuring there is safety both inside and outside of the therapy space, while also developing specific skills and strategies to manage the specific impact of the trauma(s) experienced.

— Jeff Levy, Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

PTSD issues related to childhood sexual, physical and/or emotional abuse as well as illness, death, military service, or medical/law enforcement occupation.

— Carla Edwards-Burke, Psychologist in Kansas City, MO