Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

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Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

I am a certified Perinatal Mental Health therapist and can help you navigate this new journey. Whether it's your first glimpse into motherhood or fourth, I am here to support you. During pregnancy and postpartum there's many changes physically as well as emotionally. Take comfort in knowing you're not alone. These feelings are normal. You can take steps to help you during this transitional period.

— Sherry Nafeh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

Perinatal mental health can be a doozy for so many reasons, and it unfortunately still carries such a stigma with it. I believe in honesty, activating support systems, and setting every person up for success, whatever that may look like.

— Jenny Shully, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Napa, CA

We treat Perinatal/Postpartum/Maternal OCD, providing moms-to-be and new moms who are suffering with OCD symptoms effective treatment. We offer treatment for both maternal themes, such as an intense fear of harming or contaminating your infant, as well as any other subtype of OCD during pregnancy and postpartum. Should any OCD symptoms persist after the perinatal period, we continue to provide care to our clients throughout the entirety of their OCD treatment journey.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL
 

Pregnancy and motherhood are filled with expectations of joy and happiness. When expectations are not met, it can result in a variety of mixed emotions. Things may not be discussed due to fear or embarrassment. Some women believe that something is wrong with them and suffer in silence. Being a mom is one of the hardest jobs a woman can do. Counseling and support is provided for women in all stages from preconception to the postpartum period. Let’s talk about your reality.

— April Thomas-Kenney, Clinical Social Worker in Fort Morgan, CO

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

Becoming a mother is the most difficult and complicated adjustment you will ever experience. Your body and life will never be the same. From the moment you share the news of your pregnancy, anyone and everyone seems to have an opinion, and it feels like you're wearing a t-shirt that says, "Please Advise Me On Caring For My Future Child." Don't try to get through this time alone. Let's talk about creating a plan to make sure you stay mentally healthy even on very little sleep.

— Kayce Hodos, Counselor in Wake Forest, NC

My experience treating pregnant and postpartum women over the past seven years has given me the tools to identify which factors--including a stressful labor and delivery, a history of depression and/or anxiety, and past trauma--need to be addressed to heal perinatal depression and anxiety, and strengthen the parent-child relationship. My training includes a postdoctoral specialization in infant mental health, attachment- and trauma-informed interventions, and clinical assessment.

— Pamela Hamer, Psychologist
 

When I first saw postpartum depression, I didn’t know it. I had been all about resilience beginning in the womb until I saw her ashamed, sobbing on a pile of 5-steps-to-perfect-mothering books. I hid her books & held her & the baby. It was all I knew to do. I became certified in treating prenatal & postpartum mood disorders because I realized people can't grow resilient babies without support for their own flourishing. I now help people become safe, seen, & supported in birth & beyond.

— Sarah Kendrick, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR

I spent the first part of my career working exclusively with children, which included a large amount of caregiver support, and led me to seek more specialization to support new parents (partners included) during such a vulnerable life chapter. I am certified in Perinatal Mental Health by Postpartum Support International, and have collaborative relationships with various members of the local birthing community (doulas, midwives, lactation consultants).

— Allison Staiger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Metairie, LA
 

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about: feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping newmoms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

Through my specialty doctoral trainings in perinatal mental health, I am dedicated to serving women who are pregnant and in the postpartum period navigating difficulties with mental health and attachment to their infant.

— Olivia Pointer, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

My experience treating pregnant and postpartum women over the past seven years has given me the tools to identify which factors we need to tackle to help you recover from depression and anxiety —a stressful labor and delivery, previous episodes of depression and/or anxiety, and even past trauma. My training includes a postdoctoral specialization in infant mental health, experience with attachment- and trauma-informed interventions, and clinical assessment.

— Pamela Hamer, Psychologist

Pregnancy and the postpartum period are a unique season of life that require specialized training and experience from a qualified provider. Together, we can address concerns that may arise and help you identify and strengthen the supports you need.

— Jessica Reynoso, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Gilbert, AZ
 

Trying to add a child to your life doesn't always turn out the way you expected. Sometimes there are struggles with conception, pregnancy complications, or even birth and related challenges. This time in your life can be especially isolating and can increase the stress, grief, and sadness that you experience in your life. Through emotional support, we can help you feel less alone in your experience.

— Dr. Dowtin, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

I specialize in providing support to individuals and couples during pregnancy and the postpartum period. This includes pregnancy and postpartum adjustment challenges, pregnancy and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders, fetal diagnosis, pregnancy loss, neonatal hospitalization, and parenting a medically complex infant or child.

— Kate Christman, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA
 

I have a certificate in Perinatal Mental Health through Postpartum Support International.

— Amanda Leno, Licensed Professional Counselor in Gilbert, AZ

Therapy for maternal mental health can help caregivers who… Find themselves struggling to feel comfortable and confident in their role as a caregiver; Are irritated, frustrated, anxious, or even full of rage that seems to come out of nowhere and leaves them embarrassed; Want to improve their communication with their partner, but are stuck in the same old fights and patterns as always; Are looking for ways to build more loving boundaries in all areas of their life, to be a better caregivers!

— Mija Serrano, Licensed Professional Counselor in York, PA
 

It seems so easy because so many women do it and yet being pregnant and transitioning into life after birth is anything but easy. What you might see portrayed on instagram isn't real life. Real life with a new baby brings lots of new challenges and emotions. It challenges couples that previously had no issues. It leads to identity crisis'. It's OK to not always feel 100% grateful for your new baby. You are exhausted, unsure, lonely. Asking for help is a sign of strength.

— Rachel Goldberg, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

If your postpartum recovery has been causing you to feel disconnected, guilty, or isolated: I provide you a safe space as you navigate through your life-change and support you in gaining back your connection with yourself, your spouse, or your child.

— Darcy Pare, Mental Health Counselor