Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Pregnancy and the postpartum period can put you through an emotional rollercoaster. Whether it's your first child or your eighth, I can help you sort through those feelings.

— Snehal Kanitkar, Associate Professional Counselor in Allen, TX

I have extensive training covering many aspects of mental health concerns during the pregnancy and postpartum period. I have been working with this population for four years. Supporting moms through all the phases of motherhood I feel passionate about.

— Morgan Fitzgerald, Licensed Professional Counselor in Edmond, OK
 

I have completed extensive training in the bio physiology, and psychosocial concerns related to pelvic floor rehabilitation. More than a psychological approach, as an OTR, I have the qualifications necessary to perform pelvic floor evaluation and treatment addressing: menstruation pain and, sexual and insertion pain, incontinence, prolapse, pregnancy, back pain, Diastasis Recti, postpartum depression, infertility, child rearing and menopause.

— Tina Anderson, Occupational Therapist in Austin, TX

Pregnancy and Postpartum life can be HARD. Because it's so challenging, women often experience Postpartum Depression, and lesser discussed Postpartum Anxiety. I'm here to help you navigate life with your new little one, tackle your new role as a parent, and keep connected with your partner.

— Courtney Latham, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Minneapolis, MN
 

Not everyone feels great during pregnancy, or immediately loves their child ... it can be overwhelming! Every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells them about feeding issues, lack of sleep, missing their old life, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms (and dads) weather this challenging time and enjoy their new role as a mom (or dad).

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

I have specialized training in treating women with perinatal and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally I am a trained Bringing Baby Home facilitator, a program that helps couples navigate the transition from being a couple to being a family. In my private practice I work with parents at all stages of parenting; from new born to adult children. I have found that each stage of parenting presents its own unique challenges and I have a soft place in my heart for parents and the struggles they go through as they guide their children through life.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

I have been running a permpartum support group for approximately three years and it is by far what I look forward to in my working life. I love working with women in transition and supporting them during this new stage in life.

— Annie Buxbaum, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA

My experience treating pregnant and postpartum women over the past seven years has given me the tools to identify which factors--including a stressful labor and delivery, a history of depression and/or anxiety, and past trauma--need to be addressed to heal perinatal depression and anxiety, and strengthen the parent-child relationship. My training includes a postdoctoral specialization in infant mental health, attachment- and trauma-informed interventions, and clinical assessment.

— Pamela Hamer, Psychologist
 

My experience treating pregnant and postpartum women over the past seven years has given me the tools to identify which factors we need to tackle to help you recover from depression and anxiety —a stressful labor and delivery, previous episodes of depression and/or anxiety, and even past trauma. My training includes a postdoctoral specialization in infant mental health, experience with attachment- and trauma-informed interventions, and clinical assessment.

— Pamela Hamer, Psychologist

I specialize in providing support to individuals and couples during pregnancy and the postpartum period. This includes pregnancy and postpartum adjustment challenges, pregnancy and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders, fetal diagnosis, pregnancy loss, neonatal hospitalization, and parenting a medically complex infant or child.

— Kate Christman, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA
 

Navigating pregnancy, postpartum, and experiences across the full spectrum of reproductive health journeys can be accompanied by overwhelming newness and uncertainty. From expectations not matching up with reality, to Especially in a society in which social, practical, financial, and educational support of pregnant and postpartum people (and people experiencing abortion, adoption, miscarriage, stillbirth, etc.) is wildly lacking, these seasons can be especially isolating.

— Beth Keenan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

The pregnancy can be a joyous and exciting time, it is not uncommon for women to be overwhelmed by the changes occurring in the body and the many plans to be made to prepare for a new child. Because the mind and body act as time machines, these changes can sometimes trigger unexpected feelings and fears that may be related to the past or present. I have supported hundreds of women of color through their pregnancy, the 4th trimester and beyond.

— Jeanie Vetter, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oceanside, CA
 

I have special training and experience working within maternal mental health. It is my honor to witness your transition to parenthood. Not only are you giving birth to a human being, you're also giving birth to yourself as a parent. This identify shift and new role can be challenging as you find your way and what works best for you and your family. Clients of mine have overcome birth trauma, perinatal and postpartum anxiety and mood disorders, guilt/shame, and delayed bonding and attachment.

— Kayla Scott, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Waconia, MN

Pregnancy and birth are both important transitions in life. We often feel that no matter how many books we read, we are not prepared for the very real physical, hormonal and emotional changes that take place before and after giving birth. There are so many new experiences and challenges. I offer pre and postnatal counseling to help you navigate this new phase in your life. I also offer in home postpartum therapy for new parents located in Harrison and Jackson Counties in Mississippi.

— Jacalyn Wetzel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

During pregnancy, I can support you with preparing for birth and postpartum, processing your childhood experiences that are coming up as you prepare to become a parent, addressing anxiety or fear about what comes next, and navigating sexual changes. Postpartum support may include processing the identity shift you're experiencing, processing your birth or birth trauma, navigating feeding challenges, or addressing postpartum anxiety or depression.

— Eva Firth, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

Perinatal mental health can be a doozy for so many reasons, and it unfortunately still carries such a stigma with it. I believe in honesty, activating support systems, and setting every person up for success, whatever that may look like.

— Jenny Shully, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Napa, CA
 

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

I am a Perinatal Mental Health Specialist and see many clients during this period. The client's that I see during this period may be pregnant, wanting to become pregnant, have recently suffered miscarriage, or have had a baby within the last 2 years. I have taken extra courses on Perinatal Mental Health and am required to take continuing education credits yearly to maintain my credentials. Clients may be suffering from adjustment issues or other perinatal disorders.

— Niamh Hughes, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I am Perinatal Mood Health-Certified (PMH-C) by Postpartum Support International (PSI).

— M. Cecilia Bocanegra, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Evanston, IL