Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

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It's really called Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder and not postpartum depression. That's because depression is not the only issue. There is anxiety, and a few other mood disorders that can be a part of a troubled perinatal period. You can be assisted with assessment tools, guidance and support. You and your baby can be just fine if you go for the help you need during this time. Include your core support group if you like because support is excellent.

— Antonia Allison, Marriage & Family Therapist in Diamond Bar, CA

When I first saw postpartum depression, I didn’t know it. I had been all about resilience beginning in the womb until I saw her ashamed, sobbing on a pile of 5-steps-to-perfect-mothering books. I hid her books & held her & the baby. It was all I knew to do. I became certified in treating prenatal & postpartum mood disorders because I realized people can't grow resilient babies without support for their own flourishing. I now help people become safe, seen, & supported in birth & beyond.

— Sarah Kendrick, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR
 

In pregnancy and the postpartum period a multitude of different feelings and experiences arise due to the unique process. Some can be expected, and match norms popularized by dominant media, and others can feel foreign, “not right”, or cause grief and shame because they do not match the popularized norms. This life changing experience forces you to reform your identity, whether it be your 1st pregnancy or 5th. I can hold the feelings that arise and help you become the caregiver you hope to be.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

Pregnancy and Postpartum life can be HARD. Because it's so challenging, women often experience Postpartum Depression, and lesser discussed Postpartum Anxiety. I'm here to help you navigate life with your new little one, tackle your new role as a parent, and keep connected with your partner.

— Courtney Latham, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Minneapolis, MN
 

I became particularly interested in maternal mental health after the birth of my first daughter and enjoy supporting other mothers and parents as they transition to parenthood. Having experienced postpartum depression myself and now being certified in Perinatal Mental Health, I am attuned to the nuanced experience of mothers and caregivers and recognize that the path is not always linear. You are not alone!

— Karina Akouka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

I have worked with pregnant women since 2001 and had participated in many trainings relate to Maternal Mental Health. I got the Postpartum Depression training with Postpartum Support International and the Advance Clinical training with Karen Kleiman at the Postpartum Stress Center in Pennsylvania. I belong to the board of directors of Postpartum Support International, Florida chapter.

— Ana Romero, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in MIRAMAR, FL, FL
 

I am a two time survivor of Perinatal Mood & Anxiety Disorders and have volunteered as a group facilitator for a local agency that runs maternal mental health programming. I have a passion for holding space for women during this very tumultuous time in their lives; from pre-pregnancy through to postpartum.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

I became particularly interested in maternal mental health after the birth of my first daughter and enjoy supporting other mothers and parents as they transition to parenthood. Having experienced postpartum depression myself and now being certified in Perinatal Mental Health, I am attuned to the nuanced experience of mothers and caregivers and recognize that the path is not always linear. You are not alone!

— Karina Akouka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Trying to add a child to your life doesn't always turn out the way you expected. Sometimes there are struggles with conception, pregnancy complications, or even birth and related challenges. This time in your life can be especially isolating and can increase the stress, grief, and sadness that you experience in your life. Through emotional support, we can help you feel less alone in your experience.

— Dr. Dowtin, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

I am a certified Perinatal Mental Health clinician. What an amazing time in life? It pokes at every emotion that we own. At times these emotions roll, seemingly without ownership, between rage and reverence. All deeply valid feelings. My philosophy is that becoming a parent, whether your baby is still with us or not, is the steepest learning curve in life. I have the deepest respect and honor for our individualized experiences. I am here to listen and support your journey.

— Christian Greene, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

I have completed Basic & Advanced trainings through Postpartum Support International (PSI) that focus on Perinatal Mental Health. “Perinatal” refers to the period of trying to conceive, active pregnancy, and post-birth up to one year. I will soon be nationally certified via exam.

— Jessica Bertolino, Licensed Professional Counselor

Therapy can be a place to figure out how to adjust to parenthood and how to cope with the pressures that come with this new role. It also provides you with a place to get support for what you are going through. I work with men and women who are struggling with this adjustment in a more mild form as well as men and women who are experiencing postpartum mood and anxiety disorders.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA
 

For several years I have had a particular interest in working with women struggling with infertility, miscarriage, pregnancy and postpartum anxiety and depression. I had difficult periods after each of my children and I find that my ability to relate and empathize can really help clients feel understood. Working on self-care, changes of identity and transitioning to new stages of life make this work very rewarding.

— Emilie Diesen, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Candler, NC

Being pregnant and having a child is a big life transition that many women don't share the normal "downs" of these experiences. feeling blue, having body issues, having an existential crisis, questioning if you are a "good" parent," feeling guilt, returning to work and all that that entails and so much more. While a fulfilling role to many, we all experience some feeling associated with these.

— Maria Burch, Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Pregnancy and birth are both important transitions in life. We often feel that no matter how many books we read, we are not prepared for the very real physical, hormonal and emotional changes that take place before and after giving birth. There are so many new experiences and challenges. I offer pre and postnatal counseling to help you navigate this new phase in your life. I also offer in home postpartum therapy for new parents located in Harrison and Jackson Counties in Mississippi.

— Jacalyn Wetzel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

From pregnancy loss and complications to immediate postpartum to years post-babies, I'm here to help you heal in your journey. Coping with grief and loss, motherhood challenges, body changes, and parenting issues are all a part of being a mother. Finding support during pregnancy and postpartum is extremely important and I'm here to help you.

— Melodye Phillips, Counselor in Tyler, TX
 

As many as one in five women struggle with postpartum mood disorders (depression, anxiety, OCD, postpartum rage). While everybody is busy caring for baby, the mother's needs can be neglected. I am here to care for you and make sure you are feeling your best. For many women, anxiety and depression can begin in pregnancy. Don't wait to reach out for support. I can help you find practical ways to feel better right away.

— Nicole Bolognini, Addictions Counselor in Succasunna, NJ

Trying to add a child to your life doesn't always turn out the way you expected. Sometimes there are struggles with conception, pregnancy complications, or even birth and related challenges. This time in your life can be especially isolating and can increase the stress, grief, and sadness that you experience in your life. Through emotional support, we can help you feel less alone in your experience.

— Dr. Dowtin, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor