Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Like psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. Psychodynamic therapy increases a client’s self-awareness and grows their understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. It allows clients to examine unresolved conflicts and symptoms that arise from past experiences and explore how they are manifesting themselves in current behaviors, such as the need and desire to abuse substances. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychodynamic therapy experts today.

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The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic Therapy

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Psychodynamic therapy focuses on the psychological roots of emotional suffering. Its hallmarks are self-reflection and self-examination, and the use of the relationship between therapist and patient as a window into problematic relationship patterns in the patient’s life. Its goal is not only to alleviate the most obvious symptoms but to help people lead healthier lives.

— Eric Strom, Clinical Social Worker in Minnetonka, MN
 

My approach to psychotherapy is relationship-based, attachment focused, and compassionate. Research shows the most powerful aspect of the healing process is the relationship that develops between you and your therapist. My goal is for us to address your challenges through open and trusting dialogue. My therapy is humanistic and integrative.

— Amanda Mead, Psychologist

My goal as a therapist is to help make conscious that which is unconscious for you, the patient.

— Sam Naimi, Psychoanalyst in West Hollywood, CA
 

My graduate studies specialized in various psychodynamic therapist, of which I practice Relational Psychodynamic Therapy. Using this style, I use motivational interviewing to explore past experiences and bring insight to how those past experiences impact your present. We'll also bring focus to our relationship and navigate the emotional issues that arise in the here-and-now.

— Justus Pascual, Counselor

While I integrate elements of mindfulness and CBT, my therapeutic style is primarily relational.

— Jodie Deignan, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in White Plains, NY
 

Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a therapeutic treatment modality that is used to help you gain insight into your "autopilot" patterns of behavior and relationships by connecting experiences in your past to how you think and act "out there in the world" today. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is when we have conversations to help to work through those defining past experiences with the goal of your gaining understanding as to what is not serving you and make those changes to live a healthier life.

— Carol Covelli, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,

Early life experiences impact us deeply, so understanding where you came from and how you got to this place is essential for any meaningful change. And no, I don't think we'll be blaming your parent's for everything that is wrong, but I do think we need to see how early life patterns present themselves in the here-and-now.

— AJ Rich, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Psychodynamic psychotherapy Is a modality of "talk therapy" that will help you access the roots of your inner conflicts. Sometimes these conflicts manifest as sadness, anger, or anxiety. At other times, the conflicts reveal themselves through personal and relational patterns that you keep repeating again and again. Psychodynamic psychotherapy requires we meet once or twice a week.

— Edgard Francisco Danielsen, Psychoanalyst in New York, NY

Psychodynamic therapy helps to identify where you're struggling. It can help you see yourself and those around you more clearly to promote self-awareness.

— Lindsay Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bellaire, TX
 

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension.

— Colby Schneider, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR

Psychodynamic theory is one of the many approaches I take in a session. By looking at our past, we can find what patterns are being repeated and hindering our day to day. By connecting our histories to our presents healing can happen.

— Lindsey King, Counselor in Philadelphia, PA
 

Much of my training included a psychoanalytic and psychodynamic framework for understanding where problems originated for clients. I believe early childhood experiences and unconscious processes can shed light on why my client is currently struggling.

— Catherine Bitney, Clinical Psychologist in Austin, TX

Psychodynamic therapy is effective for a wide range of mental health symptoms and focuses on the way our unconscious manifests through present behavior. Through talk-therapy, one of the primary treatment goals is to cultivate self-awareness and better understand how experiences of the past influence present thought patterns and behavior. This includes analyzing and verbalizing past experiences and traumas in an open and direct way and may also include the interpretation of symbols and metaphors.

— Feliz Lucia Molina, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

This basically just means talking and digging into stuff while we're talking. It works great!

— Matt Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Edmond, OK

Modern Psychodynamic Therapy gets a bad rep but I learned the importance and grace of this type of therapy from a past Supervisor. I use Psychodynamic tenets with clients often, specifically the strength of the therapeutic relationship and how reflection on the past can help us heal for the future.

— Jennifer Kulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA