Spirituality

The term spirituality has evolved and broadened over time and typically refers to a sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Spirituality is an expansive and wide-ranging concept encompassing many points of view. It often involves a search for meaning in life. Although it means different things to different people, spirituality can play an important role in helping people address mental health issues and maintain good mental health generally. A spiritual practice can help individuals stay grounded and provide a framework for coping with stress. If you are interested in expressing or exploring your spirituality as a part of therapy, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s spirituality experts today.

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I help those who have been members of "cult" or high-control groups. These groups may be religious, secular, psychological or career-oriented (think Multi-Level-Marketing groups). Coercion, undue influence and oppression are often used by such groups and individuals may have difficulty establishing a life in freedom, after such membership. My own experience being a member of a repressive religious group, for 26 years, informs my work. I have also educated myself in order to be of service.

— Cathy S Harris, Counselor in San Diego, CA

I have been a therapist for over 20 years, but five years ago, life happened and I began my own spiritual journey using astrology, tarot, and Reiki. My clients seem to enjoy adding those elements to the process of learning and discovering the complexities and the energies that makeup who they are and who they can potentially become.

— Renita Davis, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Gulf Breeze, FL
 

Life is often inherently spiritual to humans as we wrestle to find meaning in our lives, whether or not we realize it. This could involve a search for fulfillment in life, an existential question of who we are and what we have to offer to others, how to live morally, and so on. The journey is not easy, as it concerns the very fabric of our beings; thankfully, we do not have to journey alone.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA

I believe that spirituality is a concern for everyone. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things ... then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

Spirituality is an issue I have had the pleasure of treating, dating back to my time at Abilene Christian University. It is a concept often overlooked and one that I seek to synthesize with the mental health world by allowing my patients to examine themselves as beings who can acknowledge a higher power and simultaneously recognize that they have agency in this world to activate positive change. The use of religious materials is welcomed by me to my patients should they desire to use them.

— Dylan Daugherty, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

Because I work with clients of all faith (and non-faith) backgrounds, I get to witness the infinite variety by which we all explore the same essential questions: why am I here? Who am I? What is my purpose? Spirituality is not so much an "issue" to be dealt with or tidied away through therapy, but rather a framework to develop as you work out the answers to these and other questions through lived experience, spiritual disciplines, and the pursuit of wisdom.

— Chelsea Hall, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Princeton, NJ
 

It is a great joy for me to create a space in therapy for folks who have faith as a core identity and source of strength or calling in their life. I’m always grateful for the chance to come alongside people of faith to help them feel supported as they heal from anxiety or trauma, care for themselves more holistically, and increase the health of their relationships. This has been a unique specialty of mine since graduate school both in studies and in practice.

— Miriam Gerber, Clinical Psychologist in St. Paul, MN

Having walked through many faith traditions, I have a greater understanding of how our spirituality (or sense of community for those who do not believe in a higher power) can affect our well-being. As an ordained independent catholic (small "c" is intentional) priest, I know what it is to exist on the fringe and how to overcome stereotype and ridicule.

— Kenneth Nelan, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mequon, WI
 

I offer secular counseling for people experiencing questions around religious belief, loss of faith, or searching for sense of meaning in a seemingly meaningless world. I help those who are looking to heal from religious trauma, looking to rebuild their sense of self, and help create a new path from this new identity. I also strive to create a space for those who are questioning aspects of their beliefs that no longer feel true but still wish to maintain their spiritual and religious traditions.

— Matt McCullough, Licensed Professional Counselor

Another great passion in my work is coming along-side a client's spiritual journey. This could be anything from learning how to implement mindfulness practices for the first time to integrating mystical/psychedelic experiences to navigating spiritual practice without appropriating or harming. I find something to respect and appreciate in nearly all spiritual and religious traditions, and would love to help you learn how your connection to the Whole can help you in other aspects of your life.

— Renee Anderson, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Asheville, NC
 

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

In a safe and non-judgmental space, I offer the opportunity to explore what may emerge during spiritual exploration such as spiritual & kundalini awakening, supernatural phenomena, and sacred medicine experiences. Sacred Medicine Holistic Integration Therapy consists of embodied psycho-spiritual integration for psychedelic experiences that are a direct result of post spiritual rituals within a ceremony/retreat directed by a shaman/spiritual practitioner in a sacred group setting.

— Lina Návar, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Wholeness is your birthright. "When inward tenderness finds the secret hurt, pain itself will crack the rock and ah! let the soul emerge."

— Nini Gomes, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ellicott City, MD

As a pastoral counselor and chaplain, I work with people of faith to allow them to use their faith as a tool for empowering their mental and psychological health. While I am trained in the Christian faith ( Masters of Divinity), I also have worked with people from Jewish and Islamic backgrounds as a chaplain. In particular, I have helped many people navigate through issues of grief and loss, anxiety, and finding meaning in life.

— William Hemphill, Licensed Professional Counselor in Decatur, GA
 

Often, we can feel stuck, overwhelmed, lose faith in ourselves and others, or just need someone to believe in us when nobody else seems to. For those who believe, integrating your beliefs about God or other spiritual and religious practices can be that one extra boost you need. With a Master's of Divinity, I am comfortable integrating faith into therapy, with an emphasis on Christian beliefs. Even when you forget or don't believe, you are loved and valued. Let's invite your beliefs to help.

— John Diamantis, Licensed Clinical Social Worker - Candidate in Virginia Beach, VA

I owned a spiritual practice for five years prior to earning my Masters in Clinical Mental Health and have seen the beautiful benefits of the Spiritual and the Clinical healing process. I am a counselor, Reiki Master, Medium, Shamanic Practitioner and work intuitively with Angel tarot.

— Dixie Willis, Mental Health Counselor in Littleton, CO
 

Rhema Therapeutic Counseling and Consulting was created to integrate faith based counseling to address emotional, behavioral, mental, relational and spiritual needs wherever you are in life with acceptance and compassion. You can transparently explore concerns that are keeping you stuck. Professional counseling aims to restore wounded areas, enhance coping skills, and to promote healthy decision making.

— April Thomas-Kenney, Clinical Social Worker in Fort Morgan, CO

I approach spirituality from a psychospiritual perspective, combining skills I have learned as a Spiritual Director, Psychotherapist and Coach. I believe in multi-spiritual awareness and where I fall short on knowledge about a particular belief or faith, I am open to learning from you.

— DeeAnna Nagel, Psychotherapist
 

I earned my PhD in clinical psychology by studying spirituality and transformation. As faculty at Yale University, I conducted research with atypical psychedelic substances. My first published article was on the spiritual and psychedelic potential of dextromethorphan. I have written and spoken about psychedelic science for over a decade, co-founded the Yale Psychedelic Science Group, and documented traditional healing and religious practices in Mexico.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA