Spirituality

The term spirituality has evolved and broadened over time and typically refers to a sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Spirituality is an expansive and wide-ranging concept encompassing many points of view. It often involves a search for meaning in life. Although it means different things to different people, spirituality can play an important role in helping people address mental health issues and maintain good mental health generally. A spiritual practice can help individuals stay grounded and provide a framework for coping with stress. If you are interested in expressing or exploring your spirituality as a part of therapy, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s spirituality experts today.

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Spirituality is central to many people’s sense of meaning and purpose. I honor each client’s personal beliefs and understand faith can provide comfort. My specialty is supporting those going through post-religious deconstruction or recovering from religious trauma. With care and without judgment, I help people process grief, anger, loss of community and identity that often accompany deconstruction. My goal is to assist you in reconnecting to your inherent worth beyond dogma.

— Bee Cook, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA

During our time together, we will explore beliefs and practices related to meaning, existence, and spiritual health and healing. I often speak about spirituality in terms of the Universe and our connection to ourselves and the connection to something larger than ourselves. I will support you in exploring what your unique sense of spirituality means to you.

— Mallory Kroll, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Concord, MA
 

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

How you connect to yourself, love, nature, or an eternal being is often not discussed in therapy when in reality spirituality/religion can be just the thing we need to heal and cope from life experiences.

— Janay Bailey, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

As a former Catholic, I know what it's like to feel stuck in guilt, shame, and low self-worth caused by a restrictive religious belief system and community. I can help you step out of the mental traps that keep you stuck and move towards a life free to focus on what matters to you. Let's work together to unlearn shaming self-talk, people-pleasing, and self-abandonment so that you can start to support and care for yourself, do what matters to you, and feel like a whole person.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I offer support to persons who have left or are thinking about leaving high-control cultic groups. Many of these are religious in nature. Education and support can help you transition into "the world" and cope with shunning. I also offer support to those who are concerned about a loved one's group membership.

— Cathy S Harris, Counselor in San Diego, CA
 

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

When you have been hurt by religious abuse or cult involvement, your spiritual outlook has often been damaged. My approach to offering support for those who have been wounded by group involvement is compassionate and practical. Using my own experience and education, I can offer a perspective not held by those without experience or knowledge. After such experiences, some don't want any formal connection with religion. That is understandable and something I respect. Let's talk about your needs!

— Cathy S Harris, Counselor in San Diego, CA
 

Many clients report feeling more connected to themselves when they feel more connected to their spirituality. I enjoy working with people who find their spirituality is important to them. I explore these beliefs with clients, and include them in their treatment, when clients feel it useful. My background is especially suited for people who subscribe to eastern spiritual beliefs, but I can also work with those aligned with western beliefs.

— Sara Rotger, Marriage & Family Therapist in Montrose, CA

Many clients seek me out in my local area because I am secular, and they feel comfortable discussing their doubts and struggles to create meaning in their lives without any fear of judgment. It's common for people to question longheld beliefs upon becoming parents, and it can be stressful navigating relationships with religious family members once you've left your faith. Together we'll identify some healthy boundaries and practice ways to communicate them to the people in your life.

— Kayce Hodos, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in , NC
 

Dr. Inez is informed by Jungian archetypology, ritual, ceremony, Taoist, mindfulness, and pagan approaches when working with psychedelics for consciousness expansion.

— Janine Inez, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in New York, NY

I help those who have been members of "cult" or high-control groups. These groups may be religious, secular, psychological or career-oriented (think Multi-Level-Marketing groups). Coercion, undue influence and oppression are often used by such groups and individuals may have difficulty establishing a life in freedom, after such membership. My own experience being a member of a repressive religious group, for 26 years, informs my work. I have also educated myself in order to be of service.

— Cathy S Harris, Counselor in San Diego, CA
 

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

Experienced in integrating Spirituality and Mindfulness to increase coping skills and address life transitions and problems from a heart-centered, soulful perspective.

— Jessi Frothingham, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

Spiritual therapy allows clients to incorporate important beliefs and practices into their therapeutic journey. My clients range from religiously identified (as Christian, Mormon, Jewish, Muslim, etc) to woo-woo. I also help my clients who are recovering from harmful religious experiences untangle their life now from religious teachings and communities that shame you and stunt you from developing your own identity. If you are spiritually curious, this may be the right place for you!

— Hannah Brents, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brookline, MA
 

As a former minister, I have professional training and experience in understanding the unique beliefs and practices of a wide range of religious communities. While so much of our spiritual lives are enriching and joyous, so many of us have had experiences in church or synagogue that have been shaming, judgmental, cruel and traumatizing. Trying to develop a personal spiritual path can be wondrous and terrifying at the same time. It is possible with professional help.

— Lynne Silva-Breen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Burnsville, MN

"Spirituality" hits at the core of the self, and can inspire everything from dread, shame, to joy and belonging. When this area is wounded, it is that much heavier and more difficult to ask for help. In this area, I have extensive training, background, and experience. My hope in that is to help you articulate the pain, the loss, the joys, the meaning, identity, and everything that is 'touched' by spirituality, in order that you may experience progress towards health and healing.

— Aaron Kelsay, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I believe that spirituality is a concern for everyone. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things ... then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA