Spirituality

The term spirituality has evolved and broadened over time and typically refers to a sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Spirituality is an expansive and wide-ranging concept encompassing many points of view. It often involves a search for meaning in life. Although it means different things to different people, spirituality can play an important role in helping people address mental health issues and maintain good mental health generally. A spiritual practice can help individuals stay grounded and provide a framework for coping with stress. If you are interested in expressing or exploring your spirituality as a part of therapy, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s spirituality experts today.

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I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

Dr. Inez is informed by Jungian archetypology, ritual, ceremony, Taoist, mindfulness, and pagan approaches when working with psychedelics for consciousness expansion.

— Janine Inez, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in New York, NY
 

I often work at the intersection of trauma, spirituality and chronic pain. How we make meaning of our suffering and what it means to be a human at this time in our evolution are huge questions we humans grapple with. I believe and have seen how incorporating your own spirituality into healing can be profound (this can also be, I believe in nothing - that this is just it.) Other-times, folks have trauma around spirituality and/or their religion. I offer a space for them to unpack this.

— Emily Natale, Create Art & Wellness, Art Therapist in Providence, RI

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

In a safe and non-judgmental space, I offer the opportunity to explore what may emerge during spiritual exploration such as spiritual & kundalini awakening, supernatural phenomena, and sacred medicine experiences. Sacred Medicine Holistic Integration Therapy consists of embodied psycho-spiritual integration for psychedelic experiences that are a direct result of post spiritual rituals within a ceremony/retreat directed by a shaman/spiritual practitioner in a sacred group setting.

— Lina Návar, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

I enjoy using Jungian and transpersonal lenses to add a spiritual dimension to therapy, and I love to incorporate tarot, astrology, art, poetry, dreams, and symbolism when it feels supportive to your process. I work with all types of spirituality based on your existing beliefs as I believe that integrating spirit into the mind-body connection can add another dimension to healing work, including ancestral and intergenerational healing.

— Casey Dunne, Licensed Professional Counselor Candidate in Boulder, CO
 

If spirituality is important to a client, I find it extremely helpful for healing to incorporate that within the framework of therapy. I believe that spirituality is a personal journey that can create immense impact in people's healing.

— Heidi Beckenbach McGann, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Diego, CA

I’m in an interspiritual master’s program currently, so I am competent and deeply respectful across a wide range of religious and spiritual expressions.

— Cameron Eshgh, Licensed Mental Health Counselor
 

I have lived experience in high-control religion, and have nuanced expertise in religious trauma healing work. I would be happy to create a space where you can focus on on deconstructing the intersection of whiteness and white supremacy, fundamentalism, body shame/control, anti-fatness, anti-queerness, compulsory heteronormativity and monogamy, purity culture, perfectionism and existential dread. I also offer periodic religious trauma groups, if healing in a group context is more your speed.

— Emma Thompson, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Minneapolis, MN

Spirituality is central to many people’s sense of meaning and purpose. I honor each client’s personal beliefs and understand faith can provide comfort. My specialty is supporting those going through post-religious deconstruction or recovering from religious trauma. With care and without judgment, I help people process grief, anger, loss of community and identity that often accompany deconstruction. My goal is to assist you in reconnecting to your inherent worth beyond dogma.

— Bee Cook, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA
 

I believe we are spiritual beings having a human experience. As an ordained Interfaith/Interspiritual minister, my experience and training have prepared me to assist you in developing your spiritual self in a way that strengthens and supports your life.

— Thaeda Franz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Wernersville, PA

Spirituality is complex. It lives in how we experience life in its highs and lows, spirit carries us in to heavens and below in the depths. Its my work to ground your spiritual self with your body and to find it's integration your life. Without grounding spirits run too high or too low. When grounded within integration our spirit becomes a fountain of life giving energy and purpose.

— Erik Johnston, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Overland Park, KS
 

Many types of therapy can approach individuals in an overly scientific way, regarding mental health primarily through diagnoses and treatment strategies. In addition to being trained psychoanalytically, I have also been theologically trained to account for the spiritual dimension that plays a role in the process of healing. Whatever your spiritual orientation is, even if you are atheist, I offer an integrated approach to support your healing journey.

— Bryan Owens, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Indianapolis, IN

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

Spirituality is best understood as our sense of being fully human, experiencing ourselves as a part of life, not an object in isolation. Healthy spirituality doesn't require a theistic understanding, and having a theistic understanding doesn't guarantee us feeling fully human. I am a respectful and knowledgable therapist for those not interested in religion, religious minorities, AND those who seek a more meaningful connection to their own mainstream religion.

— Christine Bates, Licensed Professional Counselor in Oxford, MS

I have a dedicated daily meditation practice and also love to participate in silent retreats as often as possible. I am also a certified mindfulness educator through Mindful Schools and have taught mindfulness to a wide variety of folks, including youth in juvenile hall, high school faculty members, and groups in a wellness center for our aging population. I have helped people from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds learn and embrace the benefits of living their life more mindfully.

— David Watson, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Culver City, CA
 

Many clients seek me out in my local area because I am secular, and they feel comfortable discussing their doubts and struggles to create meaning in their lives without any fear of judgment. It's common for people to question longheld beliefs upon becoming parents, and it can be stressful navigating relationships with religious family members once you've left your faith. Together we'll identify some healthy boundaries and practice ways to communicate them to the people in your life.

— Kayce Hodos, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in , NC

Exploring beliefs and practices related to meaning, existence, and spiritual health and healing; enjoying a deeper felt connection with the spiritual dimension of one's life.

— Ruann Ibrahim, Creative Art Therapist in New York, NY
 

I believe that spirituality is a concern for everyone. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things ... then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough." Together we can explore the meaning of your spiritual life or lack thereof and how it is infusing you with vitality or causing harm.

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA