Stress

Stress is an important part of life. In fact, it can be critical to our survival. Stress triggers the “fight or flight” response that can let us know we are in danger. However, too much stress for too long can compromise our mental and physical health. Everyday stressors, such as work, finances, family issues or relationships can spiral out of control. If you are feeling overloaded or struggling to keep up with the demands of your life, you might be experiencing stress. Stress can be controlled, but recognizing stress symptoms can be elusive. Things like low energy, headaches, insomnia, low self-esteem, difficulty relaxing, constant worrying, feeling overwhelmed or changes in appetite can all be symptoms of stress (among many others). If you think you might be dealing with chronic stress, working with a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s stress experts today.

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Not quite anxiety but certainly not the way you want to live your daily life. This is where polishing up your habits, schedules, and intentionally increasing joy comes in. Again, we can come up with a plan, practice it, and tweak it until things feel better. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy is often where we start.

— Beth Burkstrand-Reid, Clinical Social Worker in Lincoln, NE

Not quite anxiety -- you aren't panicking and you are still getting by -- but certainly not the way you want to live your daily life. This is where polishing up your habits, schedules, and intentionally increasing joy comes in. Again, we can come up with a plan, practice it, and tweak it until things feel better.

— Beth Burkstrand-Reid, Clinical Social Worker in Lincoln, NE
 

Stress is a common occurrence in today's world. There are differences between 'normal' stress and chronic/prolonged stress. Chronic stress is harmful to one's health and can lead to significant health issues, both physical and psychological. It is important to identify stressors, explore factors that cause chronic stress, and develop strategies to reduce daily as well as chronic stress.

— Erica Zapata Gonzalez, Clinical Psychologist in Modesto, CA

Do you find yourself constantly thinking about recent interactions with people or trying to predict all the possible things that could go wrong in future interactions? Maybe you're noticing that all of the things in the back of your mind leave you feeling scattered. If this sounds like you, I want to help you learn ways to manage the thought patterns that aren't helping you. I love helping others be more successful with work and school by teaching them ways to be more calm and focused.

— Bryan Gower, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

Anxiety, depressed mood, post-traumatic stress, & ongoing sleep disruption negatively impacts your mental health, physical health, & damages relationships with the people you love. I'm trained in gold standard treatments for chronic stress that focus on increasing your skills for relaxation, being more present & in the moment, deepening your relationships, discovering your values, & committing to living a more open, flexible, exciting, authentic life.

— Dr. Brian Curtis, Clinical Psychologist in Woods Cross, UT

Have you been feeling stressed about your relationships? Feel like you have to solve your loved one's problems for them? Maybe your family member or friend is using drugs or alcohol excessively and you don't know how to help. Or maybe they have mental health issues or chronic illness that has been taking its toll on you. You don't have to do this alone. As an experienced Stress and Relationship therapist, I can assist you in sorting out your stuff and finding some relief that will stick.

— Jennifer Leupp, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA
 

Stress can impact your body and mind, leaving you feel depleted, exhausted, foggy, and tense. You might be experiencing stress from work, family responsibilities, finances, chronic illness, or a combination of factors. I want to help you change the things that are change-able and focus on accepting the things you can't change. For that accepting part, I will give you some tools that you can use when stress is overwhelming you - simple, actionable strategies that can help you accept what's happening and not get too caught up in the worries that come with stressful moments.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I take a holistic approach to managing stress and living mindfully as to not get caught up in the daily chaos of modern day living. We will work on identifying stressors and incorporating healthy habits such as meditation, exercise, journaling, and nature into your life. I am open to discussing the role spirituality and your beliefs play in your life.

— Barbara Ferri, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

The Epidemic of Modern Life in Our Society is STRESS Stress itself is not a disease, but it leads to a breakdown in psychological, body and brain functioning.  Stress is disease causing. If stress is not relieved damage occurs. As your body and brain experience your reactions to stress triggers, You have become the stressor itself. Three Inter-related Phases of Stress Damage: *Psychological and Neuronal (brain) Damage:  begins with A) feeling mentally tired, drained of energy which can mask as depression, anxiety, panic. B) Brain fatigue results in impaired focus, impaired attention/concentration, impaired learning of new information, and impaired memory recall of recent information. It can mask as attention deficit disorder (ADD).  It can also present as Mild Cognitive Impairment or incipient dementia. *Behavioral Damage: Negative changes in behavior most often show up in 2 major areas: relationships and work.  A) friction or arguments B) less productivity and creativity, C) distracting avoidant behavior (e.g. compulsions, addictions, substance abuse) . * Physical Damage: Physical fatigue, allergies, asthma, skin conditions, headaches, compromised immune system functioning, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, heart disease, heart attack, stroke and et cetera. We all react differently to stressful situations. What is stressful to one person may not be stressful to another. Almost anything can cause stress. For some people, just thinking about something or several small things can cause stress. How we react to a situation will affect how stress affects us and our health. A person who feels they do not have enough resources to cope will be more likely to have a stronger stress reaction, and also can trigger health problems. There are many techniques to deal with stress, the underlying issues that trigger stress, and the hazards of stress. If you feel stressed out, or overwhelmed, you should know that life doesn’t have to be this way. Together, you and Dr. Shawna, will look into your life to find the sources of your stress, stress triggers, and figure out what to change, or implement. These things may involve your work, your family, or all other areas of your personal life. You will also learn techniques and coping skills to help you relax. Dr. Shawna is an expert at stress management. She will help you sort through issues and find the best ways to cope in healthy ways and move forward.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

Stress can be counteracted by evaluating and addressing problematic issues. Together we can either find a resolution, or a way to make peace with the problem or problems you are facing.

— Maryann Dexter, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

Stress is like a workout - the right amount can help you rise to your full potential, but too much can leave you drained or injured. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in your ability to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI

Stress is a common contributor to depressed mood, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and unplanned changes in your sleep or eating routine. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in how to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

Stress is a common contributor to depressed mood, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and changes in your sleep or eating routine. If you're concerned about the toll that stress may be taking on your life, you might benefit from learning some concrete strategies to help you (1) find physical and psychological relief from stress symptoms, (2) rethink the source of your stress, and (3) build more confidence in how to manage the many demands the world is placing on you.

— Benjamin Pfeifer, Clinical Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI

"Stress" is a broad term, but it also broadly affects our society today, in ways that are becoming increasingly pervasive and toxic. Our daily lives can be incredibly harried, distracted, overloaded, and often debilitating. This accumulation of stress can have an impact on self-esteem, relationships, health, daily functioning, and sleep, to name a few. I use approaches based in mindfulness, CBT, self-compassion, boundary-setting, and self-care to help clients address sources of stress.

— Allison Staiger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

Your stress has been building for FAR too long; you don’t remember the last time you weren’t so overwhelmed or anxious. You can't stand how irritable you’ve become, especially around those you love. You want to be more present in your life and relationships. You want to feel like your old self again - or a new, calmer self - on a path of continued growth and success. I can help!

— Johanna Karasik, Licensed Professional Counselor in Northglenn, CO

Would it be nice to be stress free? Let's think about that. When people think about stress, there is a negative connotation associated with that word...STRESS. However, there is good stress and bad stress. Good stress allows us to stay motivated and achieve our goals whereas bad stress can cause procrastination, burn out, and feelings of being overwhelmed. Overcoming bad stress creates resilience, "if I can get through this, I can get through anything".

— Heather Nemeth, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Western Springs, IL
 

Every day you go through life without stopping for a minute. When you are able to pause and connect with your desired emotional state, on how you want to live life, whether the stress is creating family problems, financial difficulties, anxiety, depression, or feelings of not knowing what to do there is a way to connect with our emotions and brain, understanding is temporary. We can work together using techniques that will help you on a day to day life.

— Richelle Direny, Clinical Social Worker

We are living through uncertain and unprecedented times, and stress has pivoted to match this moment. Our time together provides space to learn skills to better manage stress, as well as a judgment free, safe space to share and process challenges and feelings.

— Emily Brenner, Art Therapist in Ridgewood, NY