Therapists Who Treat Other Therapists

Therapists need therapy too! While therapists are trained to provide counseling services to their clients they unfortunately can't provide the same service to themselves. Therapists experience burn out, compassion fatigue, counter transference and more while working with clients. A good therapist that want's to stay in tip top shape will receive their own counseling from a practitioner that is trained to treat their fellow colleague. Reach out to one of the qualified specialist below.

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Meet the specialists

 

I have worked with many therapists who needed treatment themselves. Therapists are human, too and just because we know what resources, tools, and practices can be helpful does not mean they are easily integrated into our lives. I thoroughly enjoy working with other therapists and helping them to deepen their relationship with all of the parts of themselves that need love and care.

— Thaeda Franz, Licensed Professional Counselor

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to our clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about deconstructing this stigma.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA
 

Being a therapist in COVID times has presented a set of unique, enduring challenges to our resilience and ability to navigate complex questions in the face of an ongoing series of crises. How well do you take care of yourself as a helper and healer? Let’s talk about it.

— Elaine Dove, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Have you found yourself saying "I don't know if I want to do therapy anymore?" Do you have clients that you dread seeing once a week? Perhaps you have found yourself being less empathic and getting annoyed? Burnout is real and these last two years we have all had our fair share of it. We have all been stretched thin and going through the same crises we are helping our clients with. Come on into my office and let me help you remember why you chose this field!

— Derrick Hoard, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , WA
 

Therapists need their own therapists more than ever right now. You are showing up every day, witnessing for others, and giving your all; it is crucial to have your own space to share and process your own experiences. It is also an incredible process to ensure your own healing and development. I will always begin with a strength based approach and incorporate a variety of strategies to address stress management, compassion fatigue, trauma, anxiety, and other related experiences.

— Regina Whittington, Therapist in Clayton, MO

Therapists need therapists just as much, perhaps more, than anyone else. Mostly focusing on therapists with anxiety, therapists who are creatives/theatre folk, queer therapists, fat therapists, therapists dealing with life transitions, therapists navigating consensual non monogamy.

— T.Lee Shostack, Clinical Social Worker
 

As therapists, we often come to this work by way of our own pain, sometimes our own trauma. We develop strengths in areas like listening, empathy, staying calm in crisis, and those lead us to this work. When we work from those trauma-forged strengths without healing, we run the risk of burning out. Investing in our own healing and developing deep compassion for ourselves fosters longevity and joy in our work, which manifests in richer experiences with our own patients.

— Liz Fletcher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oklahoma City, OK

Our jobs are hard - we provide support to those going through stressful, difficult times, learn more about our clients than their friends and family, help them with the heavy lifting of healing, and then we go back to our own lives. Without some support, therapists become over-burdened, dull, burnt out and even emotionally and physically unwell. The best therapists are those who practice what we preach - getting help and support in our own lives. After 30 years in the field, I get it.

— Pamela Suraci, Marriage & Family Therapist in CA & UT, CA
 

I have extensive experience with clinical supervision and emotional support of social workers and psychiatrists. I've worked in mental health agencies and hospitals with a diversity of high-risk patients and I aim to support anyone who is experiencing burn-out or compassion fatigue.

— Liz Silverman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. You feeling seen & heard is crucial. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about breaking through this barrier.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA
 

Being a therapist is hard at times. We are human and struggle at times. Being a therapist can trigger our own issues; and those need to be addressed to be the most effective therapist you can be. And to be the healthiest version of you. For you, your family, friends, and clients. I have had the privilege to work with other therapist's and help guide them through difficult times. I have been the therapist client and know what it is like. Now is the time to give yourself the care you deserve.

— Eric Strom, Clinical Social Worker in Minnetonka, MN

You actually know what you need to do - you’re a trained therapist after all. You guide people through this every day and ask them to trust the process and trust themselves. I've seen so many therapists fail to practice what they preach. Many of us are overworked and underpaid, feeling more than burnout and imposter syndrome, but moral injury. What if you could create a truly nourishing practice that promotes your own well being *while* being client centered? I can help!

— Rachel Gabrielle, Counselor in Seattle, WA