Veterans/Military Service

Veterans and active duty military have a unique set of circumstances and experiences that can lead to mental health issues. The sometimes dangerous and traumatic environment in which members of the military serve can lead to PTSD as well as other issues, such as substance abuse or traumatic brain injury.  When returning home, some veterans have trouble adjusting to life outside of the military and may feel disconnected from family and friends. They may isolate themselves and are at risk for developing mental health issues including anxiety and depression. Military life can also have an effect on other members of the family system. A qualified mental health professional who specializes in working with veterans and their families can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s veterans/military experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Even though military spouses are some of the most adaptable and resilient people on the planet, the constant state of change can take a toll on anyone. The worry for your spouse’s safety, the challenges with childcare, the never-ending list of things to do as a solo parent, uncertain deployment dates, and frequent moves can be overwhelming. The constant stress can cause you to feel exhausted, aimless, resentful, and alone.

— Crystal Bettenhausen-Bubulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Coronado, CA

I am a veteran of the Vietnam War. I was a loadmaster on a cargo plane that flew over Laos and Cambodia, where US aircraft were hunted by MIGs and targeted by surface-to-air missiles. While this qualifies me as a combat vet, I also served in law enforcement for 9 years, where I had a much more intimate experience with those trying to kill me and with death. My law enforcement experience spanned the 1980s, which saw the highest number of officers killed in any decade of American history.

— Erika Laurentz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Olympia, WA
 

As a Veteran of the USMC and current member of the MN Army National Guard having served on three deployments, I know the struggles of military members and their families. I understand what it is like to want to talk about your experiences and not have someone cringe, or ask all kinds of questions about what the acronyms are/mean. I get that we do not all have PTSD, and that we may just be having "normal" struggles like everyone else. But if you do have trauma, we will address it.

— Eric Strom, Clinical Social Worker in Minnetonka, MN

I recently retired from the U.S. Army and have extensive knowledge of the military world and its specific challenges (combat trauma, vicarious trauma, military sexual trauma, identity issues, interpersonal difficulties, medical disabilities, etc.). I can relate to and communicate well with my fellow servicemembers and veterans.

— CarrieAnn Lefsaker, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Raleigh, NC
 

I am a fourth-generation combat veteran who served as an enlisted service member, officer, infantry, and administrator. I deployed during Operation Enduring Freedom, and I served at our Nation's capital. Tell me your story and let's figure out the way to accomplish the mission.

— Carl Price, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in San Antonio, TX

I have extensive experience in supporting military veterans adjust to civilian life. It would be my honor to support you in helping you identify your new mission and make a plan for reaching your goals. I will help you discover how your military values and skills translate to civilian life. I can also assist you with coping with PTSD symptoms in hopes of increasing your level of functioning.

— Allison Borrasso, Licensed Professional Counselor in Pittsburgh, PA
 

As a military spouse, I have first hand knowledge, and training, in assisting individuals through their military life, and after.

— Angie Luttrell, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in , GA

I was a member of the Resilience Center for Veterans and Families for many years where I learned interventions specific to this community. I am also an Army Veteran, and currently serving as a medical operations officer in the NY Army National Guard.

— Kristjana McCarthy, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

I spent 18 months at Mt. Carmel Veterans Service Center working with military servicemembers, veterans, and their families. I've learned the unique aspects of military culture and how the culture impacts veterans - even those who don't have PTSD. I'm able to work with high-achievers to be able to maintain their skills set while development mindfulness and coping mechanisms for civilian life.

— Stacy Andrews, Mental Health Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO

As the wife of a Former Marine, I have a unique understanding of military life. I have worked in the psychiatric hospital that was the overflow to Ft. Bliss during 2009-10. Every man over 50 in my family was in the military except one. I have a greater understanding, than most, of what is required, given and gained in the military and the life that occurs afterward. Veterans and their families have a special place in my heart.

— Sydney Lucas, Licensed Professional Counselor in , PA
 

My clinical work and research focuses on the impact of deployments, PTSD, addiction, frequent relocations, and the overall dynamics of military life on the emotional well-being of individuals, couples, and families. Coping with the stress of military life can be isolating, but you don’t have to do it alone. Ready to reclaim control and redefine your journey? Allow me to companion you on the path to recovery and resilience.

— Stefanie Juten, Student Therapist in Macungie, PA

As a military retiree, I am familiar with the military life experience. You can feel safe and supported in the therapeutic space. You can take the first step towards hope and healing whether you are experiencing symptoms of trauma from PTSD, sexual abuse, anxiety, depression, or grief. You might also be struggling as you transition from military to civilian life. This can be a time of confusion for you and your family. You don't have to make this journey by yourself.

— Liliana Ramos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Milpitas, CA
 

People have said that you might have PTSD, but what does that even mean? You've lived through some difficult events, but plenty of other people have been through worse. You worry that PTSD means that you are crazy, and you don't want people to treat you differently. You're concerned that being labeled with PTSD will have negative consequences, and that has stopped you from asking for help. If you and/or your partner may be experiencing PTSD- it is possible to heal from the past.

— Shelly Crosby, Psychologist in Long Beach, CA

While I am a civilian myself, I have extensive experience in supporting military veterans adjust to civilian life. It would be my honor to support you in helping you identify your new mission and make a plan for reaching your goals. I will help you discover how your military values and skills translate to civilian life. I can also assist you with coping with PTSD symptoms in hopes of increasing your level of functioning.

— Allison Borrasso, Licensed Professional Counselor in Pittsburgh, PA
 

As a military veterans spouse I have had first hand experience in the life of service men/women and their families. I understand the challenges that they face both in active duty as well as in life after separation and the challenges faced when adjusting to life as a civilian.

— Charlotte Merrill, Licensed Professional Counselor in , CO

I am a military partner and a Certified Military Clinical Counselor offering FREE sessions to veterans, reservists, and active duty US military with proof of military status.

— Robyn Sonnier, Licensed Professional Counselor in Raleigh, NC
 

Retired disabled combat veteran with over 20 years experience within the military community.

— Erick Sowell, Clinical Social Worker in Baltimore, MD

I help military veterans learn how to confront and tolerate unwanted emotions from the past so they can turn on more positive emotions. I spent over three years at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas providing Prolonged Exposure Therapy to active duty and veteran service members with PTSD. I now help veterans in my own practice discover what it means to live a valued life instead of a life shrunk by PTSD.

— Lauren Koch, Psychologist in Spokane, WA
 

I am a prior service veteran and I enjoy collaborating with veterans as they transition and adjust to civilian life.

— Damon Neely, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

I have extensive experience in working with Veterans and active military members. Most of my clinical training was accomplished with VHA and DOD. My heart is fully with those who have sacrificed to serve our country and I have a deep understanding of the issues our heroes often bring home with them. I have intensively treated Veterans and service members with PTSD, addiction issues, serious mental illness, life and role transitions, grief, civilian reintegration, and mood disorders.

— Cari Oliver, Clinical Psychologist in Arlington, VA