Aging Concerns

It is not uncommon to have complex emotions related to getting older. While many older people are happy and content with their lives, others may feel sad, lonely, or worried about death or illness. Older adults (or adults of any age) with concerns related to aging, like most populations, can benefit from the care of an experienced mental health professional. If you have aging concerns, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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The most prevalent concerns of adults 65 years and older are the major changes that occur as we age. This includes changes in job status and finances, changes in physical and mental conditions, grief/loss, and social isolation. The goals of the therapeutic intervention is to work wholistically with all discplines involved in the individual's life, educate on aging issues and identify how to positively cope with stressful life situations.

— Julia Tillie, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Fort Worth, TX

Aging gay men face unique challenges that often go unacknowledged by the wider LGBTQ community. For many aging gay men, there is a sense of invisibility, as younger community members can be dismissive of their experiences. In addition, aging gay men may find it difficult to access support networks and health care resources. This can be due to a lack of understanding from service providers, or a lack of available resources specifically designed for aging gay men.

— Bob Basque, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Palm Springs, CA
 

Getting older does not have to mean losing your sense of self or direction in life. You may be unsure of what lies ahead or are finding that you no longer enjoy the things you once did and are feeling lonely, down, or frustrated as a result. Whatever challenges you may be up against, I believe that this can be one of the richest stages of life: one where you can find meaning in each day and be present with the people and the things you love.

— Christine Chinni, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX

Many people experience anxiety and depression about growing older, changing, and dying. Common aging concerns include changes in mobility and athleticism, increases in bodily aches and pains, menopause, and anxiety over wrinkles, skin sagging, and changing body composition. Other aging dilemmas include longing for the past, fear of the future, regrets, worries about not reaching one's potential, and FOMO (fear of missing out).

— Lauren Hunter, Psychotherapist in New Orleans, LA
 

For when my parents were not acting nor doing the right things. My grandmother was the hero in my life, and though she has since gone. I will forever honor her and those who are truly “GREAT and GRAND as PARENTS”. I SAY “THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!” I completed my Master Thesis on: What is the experience of the Elderly WHO are alone? My Ph.D. Dissertation: What is the experience of those sixty-five and older?

— Dr. Patricia Bell, Psychologist in orlando, FL

Maturing is so interesting! Our bodies change- in ways we normally don’t discuss; our perspectives change ( thank goodness!) and dealing with careers and relationships is seemingly never ending! Whether you are parenting teenagers, young adults returning home, aging parents or other relationships that just don’t feel right anymore. I get it, and I’d like to help. Let’s talk about what you need to ho forward.

— Stacey Horn, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

MidLife phase often consists of reflective thinking, worrying, reminiscing and re-living choices you wish you “had” made while being resentful of certain choices you “did” make. Unfortunately, this kind of thinking blocks you from being able to look and move forward toward some better years ahead. If you're tired of holding onto old issues and conditionings of the past and continuously struggle with negative thoughts, let's talk.

— Jacqueline Connors, Marriage & Family Therapist in Napa, CA

As one moves into older adulthood perspectives and abilities change. I have experience working with people managing multiple medical issues, grief, concerns over loss of function, and medical recovery. It has been a true honor to work with a variety of older adults at VA Medical Hospitals, inpatient rehabilitation and now through outpatient private practice. Commonly people meet with me to work through concerns related to aging, past trauma, and current medical limitations.

— K Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Oakland, CA
 

Most of our systems, such as healthcare, housing, or transportation, aren't well built to support aging. I provide person-centered therapy for you to work through the concerns that bring you to therapy. I have worked with people to address struggles related to caregiver stress, feeling isolated, experiencing age-based discrimination, feeling lost in retirement, emotionally navigating health concerns, and finding yourself in new social or emotional roles.

— Margaret Rau, Psychotherapist in New York City, NY

Aging gay men face unique challenges that often go unacknowledged by the wider LGBTQ community. For many aging gay men, there is a sense of invisibility, as younger community members can be dismissive of their experiences. In addition, aging gay men may find it difficult to access support networks and health care resources. This can be due to a lack of understanding from service providers, or a lack of available resources specifically designed for aging gay men.

— Bob Basque, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Palm Springs, CA
 

For over 10 years I've worked with seniors and their families related to aging and mental health issues. I've worked with all manner of aging and caregiving issues including dementia and caregiver burnout.

— Tara Guden, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Long Beach, CA

We begin aging from the moment we're born. Naturally, that concept looks different for somebody in their teens versus somebody who is in their 60s, 70s, 80s, or 90s. I focus on aging as a developmental stage and assist you in designing a plan and approach that works for you regarding whatever you are dealing with - whether it's mental health, social health, issues related to physical health, grief and loss, or all of the above.

— Kathy Link, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Many people experience anxiety and depression about growing older, changing, and dying. Common aging concerns include changes in mobility and athleticism, increases in bodily aches and pains, menopause, and anxiety over wrinkles, skin sagging, and changing body composition. Other aging dilemmas include longing for the past, feeling hopeless about the future, regrets, struggling with "what ifs", worries about not reaching one's potential, and FOMO (fear of missing out).

— Lauren Hunter, Psychotherapist in New Orleans, LA

The most prevalent concerns of adults 65 years and older are the major changes that occur as we age. This includes changes in job status and finances, changes in physical and mental conditions, grief/loss, and social isolation. The goals of the therapeutic intervention is to work wholistically with all discplines involved in the individual's life, educate on aging issues and identify how to positively cope with stressful life situations.

— Julia Tillie, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Fort Worth, TX
 

The most prevalent concerns of adults 65 years and older are the major changes that occur as we age. This includes changes in job status and finances, changes in physical and mental conditions, grief/loss, soclatiial isoon

— Julia Tillie, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Fort Worth, TX

As we age, life transitions can and will happen. We can embrace them and allow them to be a time of change with new learning experiences. This time can be challenging, and will it require a lot of work to navigate but you do not have to do it alone. We can work together to develop the best possible personalized treatment solutions for your personal needs.

— Colleen Craig-Akinsanya, Clinical Social Worker in Talladega, AL
 

Many of our systems, such as healthcare, housing, or transportation, aren't built to support aging. I provide person-centered therapy to work through the concerns that bring you to therapy. I have worked with people to address challenges related to caregiving, feeling isolated, experiencing age-based discrimination, feeling lost in retirement, emotionally navigating health concerns, and finding yourself in new social or emotional roles.

— Margaret Rau, Psychotherapist in New York City, NY

As one moves into older adulthood perspectives and abilities change. I have experience working with people managing multiple medical issues, grief, concerns over loss of function, and medical recovery. It has been a true honor to work with a variety of older adults at VA Medical Hospitals, inpatient rehabilitation and now through outpatient private practice.

— K Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Oakland, CA