Intellectual Disability

Intellectual disability is defined by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. A child diagnosed with an intellectual disability can learn new skills, but they typically learn them more slowly. There are varying degrees of intellectual disability, from mild to profound. While there are many interventions for those with an intellectual disability, mostly focused on educations and life skills, mental health is sometimes overlooked. Research shows individuals who have an intellectual disability have a higher risk of mental health concerns, including depression and suicidal ideation. If you, a child in your care, or a family member has been diagnosed with an intellectual disability and is experiencing mental health issues, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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Cognitive problem solving and crisis intervention group sessions and individually experience with IDD, MH and the elderly population, and those with possible previous addictions attributed to disorders. Participated actively in the clinical treatment planning for individuals under the direct guidance of Psychiatrist and Therapists (Behavioral).

— Tamika Woods, Mental Health Counselor in Philadelphia, PA
 

I have a minor in special education and I have worked with this population in various capacities for a decade. There is a large gap between mental health services and I/DD services that I hope to bridge. I’ve seen people with I/DD who could use someone who is there purely for support and to help them to love themselves more. I’ve seen more than a few parents and caregivers who could use that same support.

— Haley Britton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Asheville, NC

Sam believes in adaptive approaches to evidence based practices. Many times people with intellectual disabilities are limited to behaviorist-driven approaches. I believe person centered, client directed approaches are central to work with clients who have cognitive impairments.

— Sam Rothrock, Licensed Professional Counselor