Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a goal-focused, client-centered counseling approach developed, in part, by clinical psychologists William R. Miller and Stephen Rollnick. The goal of MI is to help people resolve ambivalent feelings and insecurities and find the motivation they need to change their behavior. Although motivational interviewing was first used for problem drinking and others with substance abuse issues, it has been proven effective for many people struggling with making healthier choices. This therapeutic technique works especially well with those who start off resistive, unmotivated or unprepared for change (and less well on those who are already prepared and motivated to change). Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s motivational interviewing specialists today.

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I utilize this approach with all change processes. The way society teaches us to think about change is misleading and can impede our ability to make change in our Iives. This approach helps fix this misconception - inciting change.

— Kelsey Whittlesey, Licensed Professional Counselor

Utilizing motivational interviewing, which is a directive client-centered counseling style, in tandem with CBT has demonstrated to bring about change and growth in patients in a rapid and efficient manner. By going through the stages of change with patients, it can help them to see where they may be stuck in ambivalence and inspire them to move in a positive direction of behavior change.

— Dawn Ginestra, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Motivational interviewing is a counseling method that helps people resolve ambivalent feelings and insecurities to find the internal motivation they need to change their behavior. It is a practical, empathetic, and short-term process that takes into consideration how difficult it is to make life changes.

— Daniel Hacker, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Garden Ridge, TX

Motivational Interviewing will be a key approach in our work together. We all have struggles with feeling motivated sometimes. With this method, I will help you uncover your own internal motivations, values, and perspectives so that you can positively work toward your goals.

— Joshua Shuman, Psychologist in Beavercreek, OH
 

Change is hard! Even when there is a part of us that is driving us to seek out help, there may still be parts of us that want things to remain the same- there can be comfort in routine can be hard to let go of. Motivational Interviewing allows us to collaborate to help you determine what changes you need to make to improve your life and how to go about doing so.

— Aaron Alicea, Licensed Professional Counselor

Change is hard! Even when there is a part of us that is driving us to seek out help, there may still be parts of us that want things to remain the same- there can be comfort in routine and old habits. Motivational Interviewing allows us to collaborate to help you determine what changes you need to make to improve your life and how to go about doing so.

— Aaron Alicea, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

The only true, lasting change that can happen is that which is initiated from within. My goal is not to change you, but to help guide you in making the change that you have been wanting to make for yourself. If others are trying to make you change, we can discuss why that is and what you think is best for you. I completed training in Motivational Interviewing seven years ago and have been successfully using it with students at school and clients in private practice ever since.

— Tricia Norby, Counselor in Madison, WI

Motivational Interviewing is especially useful when clients are interested in change, but are having difficulty moving forward. This is a way of exploring our hesitance and stumbling blocks to make lasting change more likely.

— Krista Cain, Licensed Mental Health Counselor
 

Motivational interviewing is a tool that we all can use in our daily lives. The primary principles of this technique is to use open ended questions in order to deepen the understanding of motivation (stages of change), build rapport, be empathetic to meeting client's needs, and empower self efficacy.

— Heather Nemeth, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Western Springs, IL

Motivational Interviewing is a collaborative, goal-oriented method of communication with particular attention to the language of change. It is designed to strengthen an individual’s motivation for and movement toward a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own arguments for change. Motivational Interviewing allows for collaborative conversation to strengthen a person’s own motivation for and commitment to change.

— Crystal Bettenhausen-Bubulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Coronado, CA
 

I can help by providing you with the specific tools needed to overcome your pain. Asking for help can be hard, and at the same time it is the first step toward regaining control of your life.

— Steve Helsel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Commerce Charter Township, MI

I love the open, collaborative process of motivational interviewing. It allows clients and the therapist to work together. There is no judgment. It is rooted in curiosity, exploration and if possible, understanding. Meeting my clients where they are, I ask open-ended questions to facilitate dialogue and exploration that may prompt insight, direction, and connections for the client. It is rooted in tapping into the client' intrinsic qualities and inner strengths as the experts in their own life.

— Yasmin Jordan, Licensed Master of Social Work in New York, NY
 

Motivational Interviewing can be helpful in having my clients understand how their chosen actions are influencing quality of life. Sometimes we want to make changes, but, there's something holding us back. It's easy to sit on the fence and talk ourselves out of meaningful action. Motivational Interviewing can help us clarify our goals and get unstuck.

— Aimee Perlmutter, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern

Trained to provide MI and typically always incorporate into sessions.

— Ashley Hilkey, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Bloomington, IN
 

With a background working in outpatient addiction treatment, I have extensive experience in working with your reasons for wanting to make changes in your life, and enhancing your motivation towards that change.

— Matt McCullough, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Motivational interviewing (MI) helps to build a collaborative conversation that strengthens a person’s own motivation and commitment to change. The overall therapeutic style of MI is guiding you to change goals you are wanting to achieve within your life. It is a normal human experience to be ambivalent about change and shows you are one step closer to your goal. Using Motivational Interviewing therapeutically will help you explore your own reasons for changing in a safe environment.

— Marissa Harris, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

Change is hard! Even when there is a part of us that is driving us to seek out help, there may still be parts of us that want things to remain the same- the comfort of routine can be hard to let go of. Motivational Interviewing allows us to collaborate to help you determine what changes you need to make to improve your life and how to go about doing so.

— Aaron Alicea, Licensed Professional Counselor