Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP)

AEDP was developed by Dr. Diana Fosha and borrows from many common therapeutic methods, including body-focused therapy, attachment theory, and neuroscience. The aim of AEDP is to help clients replace negative coping mechanisms by teaching them the positive skills they need to handle painful emotional traumas. Dr. Fosha’s approach is grounded in a creating a secure attachment relationship between the client and the therapist and the belief that the desire to heal and grow is wired-in to us as human beings. Think this approach may work for you? Contact one of TherapyDen’s AEDP specialists today to try it out.

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Meet the specialists

 

I have received post graduate training in AEDP through the AEDP institute.

— Rafe Stepto, Psychotherapist in Brooklyn, NY

I have trained in an array of psychodynamic approaches, but found my home in Diana Fosha's AEDP (an attachment, emotion-focused, experiential approach that seeks to identify and relinquish defensive obstacles to healing). I regularly completed trainings from 2007-2011, including her immersion course and 2 complete years of the intensive "Core Training Program". I was so invested I was a member of a group of therapists seeking to make Austin a "Third Coast" training hub.

— Mackenzie Steiner, Psychologist in Austin, TX
 

My professional training includes Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy, a form of therapy that is experiential, somatically based, relational, and healing oriented.

— Jennifer Jackson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

My professional training includes Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy, an evidence based integrated form of therapy that is experiential, somatically based, relational, and healing oriented.

— Jennifer Jackson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

AEDP allows clients to undo feelings of aloneness, process emotions fully from the sensations they evoke to the meaning behind them, and develop a felt sense of transformation and connection to one's core self. It is my primary therapeutic modality.

— Michael Germany, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX

A good add-on to CBT, AEDP helps to anchor one's thoughts and beliefs in the here and now and to help make room for new beliefs and thoughts as they arise.

— Noa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I've completed Level 2 training with the AEDP Institute.

— Bethany Haug, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

My professional training includes Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy, a form of therapy that is experiential, somatically based, relational, and healing oriented.

— Jennifer Jackson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

So many of our defenses - people pleasing, avoiding, self-judgment, worry, numbness, perfectionism - emerge as a direct result of us being unable to tolerate our core emotions, e.g. sadness, anger, fear, etc. AEDP is a psychotherapy modality through which I support clients in accessing their core emotions so that they can take authentic and empowered action in their lives. If you feel stuck, depressed, or anxious, AEDP supports you in opening up to yourself with courage and self-compassion.

— Devin Bard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Minneapolis, MN