Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Dependence

Alcohol abuse or dependency (also known as alcoholism) are serious problems relating to the habitual misuse of alcohol – typically characterized by drinking too much, too often, with an inability to stop. If drinking is negatively effecting your life and relationships and you can’t seem to get it under control, you may be abusing alcohol. Other signs could include craving a drink, drinking to relax, lying about drinking, neglecting responsibilities because of drinking, hiding your drinking, and/or driving while drinking. But the good news is, you don’t have to figure it out on your own. If you or someone you know is suffering from alcohol abuse or dependency, contact one of our specialists today to get help.

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Alcohol and other drugs can be so insidious. The pervasive use in our culture makes it really difficult to know if you're just a "normal" person who has a bottle of wine every night or an alcoholic. Where does it cross the line? I have experience helping clients to find their personal line, and set boundaries with themselves. I will never tell you what to do, but I can help you to reduce the harm that substances are having on your life.

— Colleen Hennessy, Licensed Professional Counselor in , CA

I am a Licensed Addiction Counselor and have worked in the field of addictions for several years. I use a wellness approach to addiction. We will build a Wellness Plan that promotes recovery and overall wellness.

— Jamie Glick, Therapist in Castle Rock, CO
 

When working with individuals on substance use, I let the client tell me what their goals are. The primary concern when working with substance use is safety, followed by health and wellness. Together we will evaluate client concerns and set treatment goals based on need. I do not assume that every individual struggling with substance use has an addiction. I have experience working in drug and alcohol treatment facilities, 12 step groups, and have familiarity with other recovery groups.

— Suzanne Cooper, Licensed Professional Counselor in Littleton, CO

I have extensive personal and professional experience helping others to move beyond alcohol/drug dependence. It's not easy and most people are more likely to accomplish their goals when they work with others and when they don't try to do it alone. I would be honored to be with you and support you during the process of recovery. It's one of the best things that you could do for yourself and your loved ones. And you deserve a good quality life!

— Lorrie OBrien, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Enfield, CT
 

I draw from the 12 step and harm reduction models in order to help Clients in this area. I can help you change your relationship with alcohol or get sober. I encourage a collaborative approach with primary care doctors and / or psychiatry to ensure best practice and safety.

— catherine rowe, Psychotherapist in Queens, NY

I was the lead counselor at a residential treatment facility for co-occurring disorders for many years, and have experience with all types of addiction and addictive behaviors. I incorporate SMART recovery concepts, Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and a Person Centered Approach. We will examine your thoughts, feelings and behaviors that lead to an unhealth relationship with substances and work to correct each of those.

— Katherine Pfeiffer, Counselor in Tampa, FL
 

Addiction is my primary specialization. I approach treatment from a biopsychosocial model - that there are likely biological factors (like physical dependence), psychological factors (like poor coping habits and other mental health concerns), and social factors (either isolation or being surrounded by others who are also using substances) that hold the addictive behavior in place. We'll work together to unravel all these factors and help move you forward.

— Dr. Aaron Weiner, Clinical Psychologist in Lake Forest, IL

As an individual in long-term recovery, I intimately understand the challenges of getting and staying sober from alcohol and other substances. Loss of friends and your social circle, persistent feelings of isolation, and finding new means of coping with difficult situations/emotions/stress are just a few of the issues I tackle with clients in recovery. I am uniquely equipped to help both newly sober individuals as well as those in long-term recovery.

— Nicole Bermensolo, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

The journey of evaluating your relationship with alcohol and deciding if you would like to make changes, or discovering that it's challenging to make those changes, is a personal one, and different for everyone. There are also similar challenges along the way that everyone faces, and are a normal part of the process. If you find yourself questioning your drinking, or the behaviors around your drinking, I can help support you with a nonjudgmental approach.

— Christi Proffitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

As an individual in long-term recovery, I intimately understand the challenges of getting and staying sober from alcohol and other substances. Loss of friends and your social circle, persistent feelings of isolation, and finding new means of coping with difficult situations/emotions/stress are just a few of the issues I tackle with clients in recovery. I am uniquely equipped to help both newly sober individuals as well as those in long-term recovery.

— Nicole Bermensolo, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I have 27 years' experience working in addictions.

— Patrick Varney, Associate Professional Counselor in Scottsdale, AZ

Using CBT and talk therapy

— Donn Yeager, Mental Health Counselor
 

Many individuals can experience substance use. Anxiety, fear, and hopelessness are a few emotions that can linger around substance use. We can help you work through this and guide you through the process of relapse prevention and harm reduction

— KaRon Spriggs-Bethea, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Pittsburgh, PA

Many times addiction at its core, is a result of a behavior that is used to get relief, replacing a bad feeling with a good feeling, or numbing the bad feeling so that there is nothing to feel at all. Having specialized in this field for years, I understand what works and what doesn't. I will help get to the root cause and provide discovery to independence from the binds of addiction. If talk therapy or AA is not giving you sustained results, my work is for you.

— Jacqueline Connors, Marriage & Family Therapist in Napa, CA
 

there are 3 major factors that contribute to the development chemical dependency /addiction, 1.) heredity, 2.) environment, and 3.) access to the psycho-active alcohol or other drugs . The goals of the therapeutic intervention is to assist the individual to come to the realization that the alcohol or other drugs is progressive in nature and that it takes a support system to help manage the drug dependency. This support system includes family, friends, doctors, therapists, and support groups.

— Julia Tillie, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Fort Worth, TX