Art Therapy

Art therapy is a form of creative expressive used as therapy to improve a person’s physical, mental, and emotional well-being. Art therapists are typically trained in both therapy and art, making them uniquely qualified to use the arts for mental health healing. Art therapy helps clients express themselves and can be useful for everything from managing addictions to improving self-esteem. Art therapy is for everyone, but can particularly benefit children facing issues such as learning disabilities or behavioral disorders. Sound interesting? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s qualified art therapists today. No prior art experience or talent necessary!

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Meet the specialists

 

Sometimes words aren't enough to convey what you want to say. I've found art therapy to be helpful in allowing clients to express themselves in more authentic ways. Through drawing, sculpting, even playing games (such as Dungeons & Dragons) we can dive deeper past what is just said.

— Lance Madow, Associate Professional Counselor in Decatur, GA

“I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for.” — Georgia O’Keefe

— CAROL J. STRAND, Art Therapist in Richfield, MN
 

I generally follows a client-centered orientation, emphasizing the individual strengths & resources of each of my clients.

— Jessica Morrison, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor

As a Clinical Art Therapist (ATR-P), I hold a master's degree in art therapy from St. Mary of the Woods College. I have extensive experience utilizing art therapy for assessment and treatment with children, youth, and adults. Art therapy allows clients to express themselves creatively, facilitating deeper understanding and healing.

— Jonelle Edwards, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in Midvale, UT
 

You can read my blog on art therapy here! https://www.embodyandmindcollective.com/blog-posts/what-is-art-therapy-its-not-just-for-creatives-by-shaye-mueller

— Shaye Mueller, Counselor in ,

I am a licensed and board certified art psychotherapist. My training allows me the ability to conduct talk psychotherapy, but also allows for art therapy additions as well. Even remotely, art making can be part of our session. Some people identify art making in session as soothing, and enjoy sharing their work at the end of session. Some people enjoy working after session with a specific art intervention, to help continue processing. Art making can be a great addition to our work.

— Emily Brenner, Art Therapist in New York, NY
 

I hold a masters degree in Art therapy. I find it helpful when working with clients who struggle with trauma symptoms as a form of dialog as it can tap into the emotional/visual part of the brain.

— Sharon Simpson, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor

I am a licensed and board certified art psychotherapist. My training allows me the ability to conduct talk psychotherapy, but also allows for art therapy additions as well. Even remotely, art making can be part of our session. Some people identify art making in session as soothing, and enjoy sharing their work at the end of session. Some people enjoy working after session with a specific art intervention, to help continue processing. Art making can be a great addition to our work.

— Emily Brenner, Art Therapist in New York, NY
 

I have extensive experience utilizing art therapy with clients of all ages but I am particularly passionate about utilizing art therapy with children clients. Offering them an organic way to communicate their feelings and experiences allows me a deeper understanding of how I can help them and advocate for them.

— Gracie Hernandez, Associate Professional Counselor in Smyrna, GA

Nationally Board Certified Art Therapist, practicing since 2011. In my work I use a combination of Art Therapy and verbal therapy techniques based on the specific needs of the client

— Lilith Halpe, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I am a Registered Art Therapist trained in Boulder, Colorado from Naropa University back in 2000. Art in session could look like you using the art process to give you more insights about your process. Or it could look like you doing art in between sessions to lock in the work we are doing together. It also could just be putting on the creative lens to see your life slightly differently. We need to get creative sometimes to help big grief move.

— Beth Erlander, Licensed Professional Counselor in Boulder, CO

I was trained as an art therapist at Loyola Marymount University, one of the first and most leading schools for art therapy in the US. I participate in research to build the field of art therapy, and I deeply believe in the healing power of art. Both at LMU and as an art historian, I studied the mechanisms by which humans make meaning with visual works, and I discovered that the connection between our lived experiences and the art we enjoy is an integral part of human evolution and health.

— Hannah Schaler, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

I believe that when we are able to express ourselves creatively through art/music/dance and more, we are able to begin healing. Art can be a great tool when working with kids and teens as well as it gives us a way to connect and communicate with more than words can provide. I personally create and engage in creative activities in sessions with clients to normalize this as a tool. I have over 5 years experience using creative therapies in practice.

— Kim Lycan, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Richland, WA

Accelerated Resolution Therapy is a quick and effective way to create lasting change. ART does not require you to talk about your painful past in order to heal from it. You, the Client, are in control of what is happening in session. Accelerated Resolution Therapy is an innovated approach building off of EMDR and combining a multitude of traditional psychotherapeutic techniques utilized in... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Gestalt, Brief Psychodynamic, Exposure, and CBT.

— Stephanie Milliron, Counselor in phoenix, AZ
 

Art is a medium that allows us to express ourselves and more abstract thoughts without the need of words. It's something that I like to integrate into my in-person sessions whenever possible to allow clients the freedom to explore complex thoughts and emotions non-judgementally.

— Peter Lachman, Social Worker in Chicago, IL

Art therapy is the approach in which I have the most training and experience. Art therapy is a way of delivering and processing therapy within the context of creation. I studied at the Drexel Graduate Art Therapy program, and have received my Board Certification.

— Christina Marrero, Licensed Professional Counselor in Flourtown, PA
 

Art therapy is the approach in which I have the most training and experience. Art therapy is a way of delivering and processing therapy within the context of creation. I studied at the Drexel Graduate Art Therapy program, and have received my Board Certification.

— Christina Marrero, Licensed Professional Counselor in Flourtown, PA